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Old Dec 16, 2007, 12:05 PM   #1
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Well, I've had my Canon Powershot S2 IS for 2-3 years now and feel that I'm ready to make a jump into the SLR world. I've taken some very nice pictures with it and familiarized myself with the use of the telephoto and wide angle lenses that I purchased for this camera.

Although I'm still learning things about photography I think I'm ready to advance myself and get into the SLR models.

I've been reading the reviews and I really like the Canon 40D but I don't want to be biased in my purchase just because I enjoyed my S2 IS. I'm thinking it'd be best to stick with Canon because I've become familiar with their features and think adapting to the 40D will be easier than switching to say Nikon.

I was hoping that someone could give me suggestions to some other SLR's and how they might benefit me in the long run.

I like to take nature photos when I can but I would also like to get into action shots and take good portrait photos.

I was originally focussing on the Canon Rebel series but kind of fixated on the 40D due to the higher ISO andDigic III processor. I'm looking to purchase something for the long run and is easily flexible in experimenting with other lenses etc.

Spending the extra money for a camera isn't entirely concern as long as I'm getting the most of my money, especially since I'm looking to buy a camera for the long haul.

My pops has a Canon Rebel and he thourougly enjoys it and when I have used it I've also enjoyed.

I know it seems like I've made up my mind, and I can't go wrong getting the 40D, but I'm seriously looking to look in to some other options.

Any help is appreciated!
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Old Dec 16, 2007, 12:31 PM   #2
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Viroguy wrote:
Quote:
Spending the extra money for a camera isn't entirely concern as long as I'm getting the most of my money, especially since I'm looking to buy a camera for the long haul.

[snip]

I know it seems like I've made up my mind, and I can't go wrong getting the 40D, but I'm seriously looking to look in to some other options.
Well, in addition to the EOS-40D, I probably wouldn't rule out models like the Sony DSLR-A700 and Nikon D300 either if budget permits. These are both brand new.

There are a number of models in between entry level and newest advanced amateur category models, too (for example, the Canon EOS-20D, EOS-30D, Nikon D80, D200).

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Old Dec 16, 2007, 4:39 PM   #3
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I think if it came down to it my preferences would be between Canon and Nikon....although I know that some of the Sony cameras are good I'm just not a Sony fan. ....that being said, I see that the 20 and 30D SLR's don't have Digic III correct?

Being aborderline photo amateur, what benefits would I expect with the Digic III as opposed to the Digic II keeping in mind I'm looking for something to use for the long run....

I do like the fact the ISO range is good on both of them...

I will have to look into the Nikons more...
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Old Dec 16, 2007, 5:07 PM   #4
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I wouldn't worry too much about what Canon decides to name the internal processing (Digic II or Digic III). ;-) That seems to be the trend lately (manufacturers trying to come up with fancy names for that kind of thing).

You do have some differences as you go from one model to the next. The EOS-40D has a higher resolution sensor (10MP versus 8MP) compared to the 20D or 30D, dust reduction, newer viewfinder design, faster frame rate, larger buffer, improved Autofocus, more control over some features, etc.).

Read the reviews to see how they compare. Each newer model will have some improvements on the previous model within this lineup. But, depending on what you shoot, you may not see any difference between them (i.e., you may not take advantage of any of the newer features, and image quality is going to be roughly the same between them).



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Old Dec 19, 2007, 3:13 PM   #5
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Viroguy, I also have an S2 IS and may buy a DSLR in the future.

Myself, I've got my eye on the Pentax K100D. Perhaps it may interest you for the same reasons?

Here are the advantages I see:
4 x AA Batteries (same as S2)
SD memory (same as S2)
Image Stabilization (S2 has something similar)
Entry level cost
Lots of used Pentax lenses to choose from, even more if you buy a screw mount adapter. All will be stabilized, thanks to in-body shake system.

I could be wrong, but doesn't it use the same image sensor as the Nikon D40?

Brad


Review:
http://www.steves-digicams.com/2006_reviews/k100d.html
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Old Dec 19, 2007, 7:16 PM   #6
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I just went through this same process and ended up buying the 40D. It is an awesome camera. I was looking at an XTI and I liked what the 40 had to offer as far as long term use. I have a friend with an XT and it is a fantastic camera. I bought the camera to take pics of the kids and their sporting events. I liked the build of the 40 better than the XTI. A major plus in my decision was than we can use the same lenses, so if you have a good friend with a Canon set up then that is a major advantage as long as you can borrow lenses from each other.
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Old Dec 19, 2007, 7:39 PM   #7
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One of the things you may have grown accustomed to in your S2 IS is image stabilization. The Canon 40D and XTi dSLRs don't have it, as Canon puts it in the lenses, not the camera bodies. That means if you want image stabilization, you'll have to pay extra for Canon's IS lenses. For the types of shots you say you want to take (nature, action, portrait), I'd say that IS is something you should consider. IS is mostly only a significant benifit when using longer lenses, and that's what you're talking about.

To be sure, Canon is a vary good choice for those types of photography, but the IS lenses are bigger, heavier, and more expensive, if you decide you want (or need) IS.

Nikon would also be a good choice, but again, the IS (Nikon calls it VR) is in the lenses, not the camera bodies.)

DSLRs from Pentax, Sony and the Olympus E-510 all have sensor shift image stabilization in the camera body, so any lens you use will benifit from it.

The problem with these cameras is that the choice of good lenses for what you want to shoot, is narrow (especially the Pentax and Olympus))and often expensive (especially the Sony and Olympus).
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Old Dec 20, 2007, 1:23 AM   #8
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Each camera model has their advantages and disadvantages. I, personally, don't find the lens selection for Pentax cameras at all limiting - but then I'm using a couple of fast lenses I bought over 25 years ago and they are old friends. I also have several lenses that I've bought since I bought a dSLR, several new ones and several used. Pentax doesn't have an inexpensive fast, long lens (they do have really expensive ones) with the emphasis on fast. However,they do offer some shorter fast zooms that are new and a number of fast primes, along with slower zooms.

Whenever I think about how wonderful it would be to have a FA*80-200 f2.8 lens (no longer in production but occasionally available used), I look at it's weight - at 1510 grams, it's not something I can probably handhold, and that's what I do mostly (I'm a day hiker and do lots of macro). The Canon VR 70-200 f2.8 (B&H price is over $1,500) is over 1400 grams - way more than I can manage, too. My heaviest lens is 850 grams, and I sometimes struggle with it's weight (especially when I've just hiked 3 miles or more uphill).

I could easily have all focal lengths from 10mm to 300mm covered by various lenses (I have most of that now, only missing the wide angle). If your needs require a heavy, fast, long lens then Pentax would not be the best choice. However, for nature shots while hiking and for most normal/general photography needs, Pentax has quite a bit to offer.
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