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Old Jan 2, 2008, 7:42 PM   #1
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The camera is primarily used for taking pictures of items which will be on ebay to describe the item, so it is important that the pictures have realistic colors and that the camera is able to take good relatively close-up photos.

I have looked at EX-Z1050 Exilim, CASIO EX-V8 and EX X850, to my knowledge the X850 is the cheapest but is the EX-V8 worth tha extra price?

If the EX-V8 atleast gives equally good pictures in closeup in maybe not necessary optimal lighting I'll go for it instead of the X850 which indeed has "ebay button".

Is one of these casio cameras good option or can you recommend a better camera?

thank you for your suggestions and recommendations.
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Old Jan 3, 2008, 3:55 AM   #2
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It depends on how close you mean by close up. If you're selling a vase then you can get the shot even if your 6-10 feet away. However, if you're talking a picture of a ladies broach then you're going to have to be within a couple of feet, or maybe even inches. If you're taking close up pictures then you will want to get a camera with a macro mode.

I can't really give much advice until I know what you're going to be taking pictures of.

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Old Jan 4, 2008, 9:42 AM   #3
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twicewise makes an excellent point. The operating distance between camera and subject is critical. Likewise lighting is also critical. Using a camera's built-in flash often results in some very harsh shadows.

Give us a bit more detail please and tell us something as well about your photo experience as well. Budget details would also be very helpful.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Jan 5, 2008, 2:32 PM   #4
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TwiceWise wrote:
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It depends on how close you mean by close up. If you're selling a vase then you can get the shot even if your 6-10 feet away. However, if you're talking a picture of a ladies broach then you're going to have to be within a couple of feet, or maybe even inches. If you're taking close up pictures then you will want to get a camera with a macro mode.

I can't really give much advice until I know what you're going to be taking pictures of.

-TwiceWise
Thanks for both of yourreplies,wery much appreciated.

If the camera can give good pictures without flash I think it would be perfect flash often gives bad images.

Well I think it is important that the camera can work in not so bright situations, because you don't always have the luxury of having perfect sunlight(many times just lamps).

Well the distance iskind ofimportant, because the products areconsole game accesoriesand the priority is getting good colors and also get some details when needed.

Ofcourse some items need better details so a camera which can get good zoom might be good.

Acamera that can give "perfect" imageson pictures taken almostall the time is good, becausefrom own experience simpler cameras you have to sometimes take 20-40 pictures before you get a goodimage.

What do you guys recommend?




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Old Jan 5, 2008, 3:16 PM   #5
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And how much have you budgeted for this camera?

Sarah Joyce
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Old Jan 5, 2008, 6:47 PM   #6
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I'm not going to say the camera you choose isn't important, because it is. However, for product photography, it's all about lighting. You need lots of it. There is no way to do good product photography in less than optimal lighting. You can't typically get it done with just the camera's flash, or just by photographing near a window. I think lighting is what is causing you to take 20-40 shots before getting a keeper.

A quality tripod will also improve this sort of photography as well.
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Old Jan 6, 2008, 10:12 AM   #7
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rjseeney wrote:
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I'm not going to say the camera you choose isn't important, because it is. However, for product photography, it's all about lighting. You need lots of it. There is no way to do good product photography in less than optimal lighting. You can't typically get it done with just the camera's flash, or just by photographing near a window. I think lighting is what is causing you to take 20-40 shots before getting a keeper.

A quality tripod will also improve this sort of photography as well.
agreed on the lighting... I posted these in another "e-bay" thread...

Here is with the built in flash...




Not terrible... probably would work fine for e-bay...

but add an external flash and bounce it off the ceiling for a more even lighting....


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Old Jan 6, 2008, 3:24 PM   #8
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Most camera's only need a few shots to get a good picture. If it's taking 20-40 shots then my guess is that you're not using a sufficient amoung of light. Not having enough light can create a variety of problems.

1. A lot of the pictures will come out blurry because of camera shake. The longer the shutter has to stay open the more chance that you will move the camera while the shutter is open resulting in a blur. The less light you have the longer the shutter takes.

2. Low light can result in an excess of shadows, a dark brown tint to the image and a lot of artifacting. Thus the lit areas will have a yellow cast and the underlit area will fade to black very quickly.

3. Low light can result in a loss of details. Fine lines or intricate patterns will blur or fade out.

However, it's not difficult to have plenty of light. If you have a little point and shoot camera then don't bother with an external flash. Instead buy a couple of shop lights, they're only about $5 each. And then get a lightbulb that is similar to natural sunlight. I think the "reflection" bulbs are suppose to be like that. Then, light your subject, whip out your camera and experiment. It shouldn't take too long to get the exposure right.

- TwiceWise
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