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Old Jan 5, 2008, 1:46 PM   #1
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I've been using a Canon PS S70 for personal photography and for my work as a graphic designer. While it's been a wonderful camera for a total amateur like myself, it does have some limitations. I take a fair number of architecturural photos, and the barrelling is always a problem, especially in interior situations. The flash is not capable of lighting up a large area, so in certain architectural interior shots where the daylighting is not ideal using the flash is frequently of little help. Image quality also drops off significantly at high ISO settings.

I had been planning on getting the Rebel XTi, which would be my first SLR. My daughter has one, and I've been impressed by the quality of images she's taken. However, I just learned about the 12MP G9, and I'm wondering if the 2 extra MP over the 10MP XTi will compensate in any way for what I assume are superior optics in the XTi.

• Will barrell distortion in the XTi with the Canon kit lens be less than in the G9, or will I need to get a wide-angle lens to truly make a difference?
• Will the XTi image quality be superior to the G9 in terms of clarity, depth of field, purple fringing, etc.?

thanks!
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Old Jan 5, 2008, 3:29 PM   #2
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Bluestatedon-

The Canon XTi is the better choice. It has a hot shoe for that external flash that you will need. The kit lens gives you an effective 28mm (in 35mm terms) view. It does exhibit a bit of barrel distortion.As this is used in your work, the set-upis also a tax deductible expense.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Jan 5, 2008, 4:04 PM   #3
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Thanks, Sarah.

I assume that I'll need to get a separate wide-angle lens to minimize the barrelling. Is there one you can recommend? If you have the XTi yourself, do you have any comments, pro and/or con?


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Old Jan 5, 2008, 4:42 PM   #4
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Most wide angle lenses, even top of the line exhibit some barrell distortion...it's difficult to get around. The good news, is the distortion is now easily fixable in post processing.

Without a doubt the XTI is the better choice and will give you the flexibility you need in the low light situations you'll occassionally encounter.
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Old Jan 5, 2008, 6:33 PM   #5
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Interesting that even the high-end (and I guess high-cost) lenses don't eliminate it entirely.

I've become somewhat adept at using the filters and transform tools in Photoshop to mitigate barrelling, but I think there are some standalone programs or plugins specifically designed to deal with it. I'd imagine they're quicker and/or more effective.

thanks,
D
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Old Jan 5, 2008, 10:10 PM   #6
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Bluestatedon-

You could probably get by to start with using the Canon Kit lens. If you determine that the barrel distortion is too great, then opt for the wide angle. You will have a lot to learn, so let's minimize the variables for now. Another good acquistion would be a tripod.

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Old Jan 5, 2008, 11:02 PM   #7
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Bluestatedon-

To give you a bit of perspective, here is what the Canon Kit lens can sort of do. This was taken with a Nikon D-40X and the 18-200mmVR lens in the 18mm position. i used the Nikon SB-800 Flash in the bounce position.

The 18mm of the kit lens may be quite workable for you.

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Old Jan 5, 2008, 11:04 PM   #8
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Bluestatedon-

And here is the field of view using the Nikon D-40X equipped with the Nikkor 12-24mm lens set to the 12mm position, which is effectively 18mm in 35mm terms. I used the SB-800 flash in the bounce position.

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