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Old Jan 10, 2008, 6:35 AM   #1
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Is it really the battery type in the A570 that is slowing it down like the Canon representative told me over the phone, or is there another element(s)--like the AF assist flash. that I need to look for?

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Old Jan 10, 2008, 8:00 AM   #2
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Can't see how it would be your battery. Thecamera is going to draw the same amount of current froma cheapo throwaway alkaline as it is from a more expensive rechargeable lithium or NMh. The only difference is that a more expensive higher capacity battery is likely to last a lot longer.
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Old Jan 10, 2008, 10:55 AM   #3
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If you are talking about the recycle time of the flash. I.e. how long it takes for the flash ready light to come on. Then yes the batteries make a difference. I'm not going to give a technical answer. But I can say from experience that alkaline batteries get weaker as the loose their power thus it takes a little longer to charge the flash capacitor with every shot. Where as N/Mh's have a more constant output then die quickly in the end. I've never bothered to test the difference in recycle times when both types are fresh and I don't have enough experience with lithium's. But is obviously there is more at work here than just voltage.
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Old Jan 14, 2008, 5:05 AM   #4
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If you are talking about the amount of time it takes the camera to snap a photo - time from when you depress the shutter release button to when the picture is actually taken - this is not the battery.

Digical cameras have what is known as lag times that vary from brand/model to brand/model. And this is a function of the design, not the battery.

If lag is the issue, you may want to check the reviews of Steve's for your camera model.
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Old Jan 25, 2008, 11:32 AM   #5
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The 570 uses two AA batteries. I have the older 620 that uses four AA batteries. My 620 will recyle/recharge faster after a flash picture, than the 570 with only two batteries. That may be the slow down factor with your unit.
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Old Jan 26, 2008, 3:09 AM   #6
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ron519098 wrote:
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....Thecamera is going to draw the same amount of current froma cheapo throwaway alkaline as it is from a more expensive rechargeable lithium or NMh. The only difference is that a more expensive higher capacity battery is likely to last a lot longer.
No it isn't! This is because the internal resistance of throwaway alkaline batteries is relatively high, compared with rechargeables, so their high-current delivery capabilities are relatively poor. This is especially noticeable when recycling flashguns, for example. Modern digicams demand a lot of current.

Throwaway alkaline cells are very good for holding their quite large amounts of charge for very long times. Therefore they were, until recently, the best option for things like clocks, remote controls, flashlights, and keeping the clocks & settings running in little-used cameras. But even this use is partly superseded by 'hybrid' Ni-MH batteries (e.g., Hybrio, Eneloop) which hold their charge much better. They contain lots of poisonous heavy metals that are used only once, and expensive to collect & recycle.

Li-ion rechargeables would be a better bet for almost everything, were it not for their higher cost and limited overall lifetime (3-4 years?) regardless of how much you use them.
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Old Jan 28, 2008, 12:33 AM   #7
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Alan T wrote:
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No it isn't! This is because the internal resistance of throwaway alkaline batteries is relatively high, compared with rechargeables, so their high-current delivery capabilities are relatively poor. This is especially noticeable when recycling flashguns, for example. Modern digicams demand a lot of current.
Yes, alkalines are not very good in high current applications. Their voltage tends to drop very quickly.
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