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Old Jan 16, 2008, 12:15 PM   #11
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tanks to all relyers for your anwers

Al last I managed to contact the supplyer's assistance, but the technitian confessed that he does not hsve enough know how about this particular model.

His manager promised to take the camera to be tested thoroughly in their lab.

After this I wil know more and tell you what I know.

As to the "pan" remark, as some of you said, and are right, it is used in pan shooting to minimise vertical movement only

shmueli
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Old Feb 11, 2008, 7:50 AM   #12
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Well my new s5 isback from the supplier's lab,where they say ithada thorough test.

They said that there is nothing wrong with it. As to the complain about the stablizer not doing a good job in the continuous mode, they say that this is normal, and one should better use the one shot mode (isn't it a shame?)

To tell the truth, I am a bit disappointed from the IS of this camera. I was hopig that it will do a better job. One reader said that the stabilizer is not such an impotant thing and one can do quite well without it. All I can tellhim that when your'e over 75, your hand is not so steady any more (andI do not drink!)
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Old Feb 11, 2008, 8:17 AM   #13
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As to the how or why's I'm not sure why these modes function differently, and the technical explanation is probably way over my head. I did find this article that confirms the results you've been getting...

http://www.digicamhelp.com/camera-fe...s/is-modes.php

I do know that IS/VR has limitations, and really works best with static subjects. Low light reduces the effectiveness, as even small movements can create problems with longer shutter speeds.

Since you've found the single shot mode woks best indoors, just stick with it. the only advantage to continous mode is that you can compose a bit easier as the effect of IS is shown on the LCD when framing. It does not refer to continous shooting mode.




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Old Feb 11, 2008, 11:01 AM   #14
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Thanks Rjseeney.

I appreciate your concern about my complain. It strengthens my point that the S5- IS is not so perfect as the brochures make you believe it is.

I read the article you mentioned, and agree with every word of it, including the remark about the misleading terms used in the ads.

I hope everyone will know these facts, before running to the store to buy a camera that the brochure says it prevents blur pictures

Shmueli
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Old Feb 11, 2008, 11:06 AM   #15
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I still do not understand why the article says that the IS should be disabled, while using a tripod. May be it is not needed, but what harm can it do if it is on?

Can you or anybody explain why?

shmueli
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Old Feb 11, 2008, 11:07 AM   #16
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shmueli2 wrote:
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To tell the truth, I am a bit disappointed from the IS of this camera. I was hopig that it will do a better job.
The S5's IS is among the the the most effective among P&S cameras. It does not, however cure all causes image blur such as subject motion or focusing errors. Below is a quote from DPReviews IS tests:

"The first option makes framing easier - the IS system steadies the preview image, and we found it more consistently effective at extremes (where the shutter speed is more than 3 stops slower than would normally be used for the focal length you're shooting at) than the shoot only mode. Shoot only - which doesn't steady the preview image, but is theoretically more efficient because it minimizes the amount of corrective movement required by waiting until the instant the picture is taken - is perfectly effective when you're nearer to the correct shutter speed (and once you're within 1 or 2 stops it is actually more reliable). I wouldn't read too much into the fact that our results for the relative effectiveness of the two modes are the opposite to what we saw with the S2 IS; we have no quantitative tests for stabilization, and every person's 'shake' is different; users often disagree on which mode works best, so you just have to find which best suits your style of shooting.

I certainly found it made handheld shots at 3, 4 or even 5 shutter speeds slower than normal perfectly possible. Impressive stuff (though the reliability is much better if you're within 3 stops), and if you take a couple of 'safety' shots when pushing the system hard (1/30th at 432mm for example), you'll usually get at least one 'keeper'. "

The full comments can be found at: http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/canons5is/page6.asp

Good technique still counts. Use the EVF rather than the LCD as the camera will be steadier up against your face rather than away from your body. Use two hands with the left hand under the camera. The camera will be steadier if you're sitting or kneeling and circumstances permit. If there is a handy wall or column, lean against it. I shot an auto show last Saturday with my Kodak Z612 (IS) and 90% of my shots had shutter speeds of 1/8-1/10 sec., almost all of those I was kneeling, both for composition reasons and for steadiness, and all but about three where sharp. I do grant that I'm 13 yrs younger than you.

It might be useful if you could post a few of your pics and let the group examine them to see if camera shake is issue or something else is going on. Be sure the EXIF data is attached.
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Old Feb 11, 2008, 12:51 PM   #17
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shmueli2 wrote:
Quote:
I still do not understand why the article says that the IS should be disabled, while using a tripod. May be it is not needed, but what harm can it do if it is on?

Can you or anybody explain why?

shmueli
This topic has been discussed at length recently: http://forums.steves-digicams.com/fo...amp;forum_id=2

IMO the "switching off IS for tripod use" advice is mostly obsolete on current cameras. Also, IMO the referenced article is too generic to be used for anything other than a starting point for your own experimentation.

Again, if you can post a couple of photos you're dissatisfied with it might help identifying the problem.
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Old Feb 11, 2008, 1:24 PM   #18
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Quote:
IMO the "switching off IS for tripod use" advice is mostly obsolete on current cameras. Also, IMO the referenced article is too generic to be used for anything other than a starting point for your own experimentation.
Agreed. My only point in referencing the article was to show the original poster's results are not unusual, thus there was likely nothing wrong with the camera. It explains the results, but not the reasons as to why.
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Old Feb 11, 2008, 2:38 PM   #19
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rjseeney wrote:
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Agreed. My only point in referencing the article was to show the original poster's results are not unusual, thus there was likely nothing wrong with the camera. It explains the results, but not the reasons as to why.
I fully agree that the camera is probably fully functional. I haven't used either an S3 or an S5 but the only reason I use single shot stab. on my Z612 is to conserve the battery. I haven't been able to discern any difference in stab. effectiveness between continuous and single-shot on that camera when hand-held. I have formally tested the IS when the Z612 is tripod mounted and there was no difference in sharpness regardless of IS mode. A sample of those test pics have been posted at thread in my 11:51am post. As I noted in that thread my shutter speeds where in the 1/8th sec. range for those tests, results with a 2 sec. exposure might be different.
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Old Feb 11, 2008, 3:21 PM   #20
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dear ac.smith , thanks

I have learned quite a lot from your answer, however the stops issue is not clear to me. how do you decide how many stops you are below the correct one? please explain.

And quote you:

.........doesn't steady the preview image, but is theoretically more efficient because it minimizes the amount of corrective movement required by waiting until the instant the picture is taken - is perfectly effective when you're nearer to the correct shutter speed (and once you're within 1 or 2 stops it is actually more reliable)............
I certainly found it made handheld shots at 3, 4 or even 5 shutter speeds slower than normal perfectly possible. Impressive stuff (though the reliability is much better if you're within 3 stops),..................


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