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Old Mar 2, 2008, 12:40 PM   #1
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Hello,

What are the advantages and disadvantages of the Sony A200 for shooting all different types of things. How well does this camera do in low-light conditions? Does this camera have a hotshoe for a flash?

Thanks in advance.
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Old Mar 2, 2008, 1:19 PM   #2
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check out steve's main page and do a search for that camera review. His reviews are by far some of the best around.

dave
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Old Mar 2, 2008, 1:23 PM   #3
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From what I've seen, it's got much lower noise levels compared to the older A100. It's also got a faster AF system (Sony claims it's 1.7x as fast and user reports I've seen have been positive).

This is Sony's new entry level DSLR model and depending on what you want to shoot, a more advanced model may be appropriate (for example, one with a faster 5fps frame rate for sports, or more dedicated controls for faster access to some functions, a larger viewfinder, or features that are missing like Depth of Field preview and more).

Depending on what you want to shoot, and the conditions you want to shoot in, your lenses are going to be more important than the camera body.

So, I'd give members a better idea of what you're looking for a camera to do for better responses (along with a desired budget).

Yes, the A200 has a hotshoe. But, it's not an ISO standard shoe. So, you'd need to use a flash model that's compatible with it (for example, the Minolta 2500, 3600HS, 5600HS; Sony HVL-36AM, HVL-42AM, HVL-56AM). Sigma, Metz and Sunpak also make some flash models designed to work with Konica Minolta and Sony DSLR models (both use the same hotshoe design and flash protocol).

If you need an ISO standard foot for a non-dedicated flash, you can get an adapter like this one (and this one also gives you a PC Sync Port, since the A200 does not have a PC Sync Port built in).

http://www.gadgetinfinity.com/produc...275&page=1


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Old Mar 2, 2008, 1:33 PM   #4
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Photo 5 wrote:
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check out steve's main page and do a search for that camera review. His reviews are by far some of the best around.
We haven't posted a Sony A200 review yet. ;-) It's a new camera model (just started shipping within the past few weeks).

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Old Mar 2, 2008, 1:44 PM   #5
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JimC wrote:
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From what I've seen, it's got much lower noise levels compared to the older A100.* It's also got a faster AF system (Sony claims it's 1.7x as fast and user reports I've seen have been positive).

This is Sony's new entry level DSLR model and depending on what you want to shoot, a more advanced model may be appropriate (for example, one with a faster 5fps frame rate for sports, or more dedicated controls for faster access to some functions, a larger viewfinder, or features that are missing like Depth of Field preview and more).*

Depending on what you want to shoot, and the conditions you want to shoot in, your lenses are going to be more important than the camera body.*

So, I'd give members a better idea of what you're looking for a camera to do for better responses (along with a desired budget).

Yes, the A200 has a hotshoe.* But, it's not an ISO standard shoe.** So, you'd need to use a flash model that's compatible with it (for example, the Minolta 2500, 3600HS, 5600HS; Sony HVL-36AM, HVL-42AM, HVL-56AM).** Sigma, Metz and Sunpak also make some flash models designed to work with Konica Minolta and Sony DSLR models (both use the same hotshoe design and flash protocol).

If you need an ISO standard foot for a non-dedicated flash, you can get an adapter like this one (and this one also gives you a PC Sync Port, since the A200 does not have a PC Sync Port built in).

http://www.gadgetinfinity.com/produc...cat=275&page=1

For the most part it would be used for shooting family events, and maybe every once in a while a sports event.

Thanks.
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Old Mar 2, 2008, 1:49 PM   #6
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Any of the DSLR models can took good photos in most conditions. At family events, you may want to consider an external flash if they're inside for more even lighting.

As for the sports, it depends on what type. If you want to be able to shoot games at night, or indoor sports, then you'll want to weigh your lens choices and cost very carefully (as you'll need brighter lenses than the kit lenses included by the camera manufacturers in popular DSLR kits, and brighter lenses can add considerable cost to a camera system).

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Old Mar 3, 2008, 7:15 AM   #7
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JimC wrote:
Quote:
From what I've seen, it's got much lower noise levels compared to the older A100.* It's also got a faster AF system (Sony claims it's 1.7x as fast and user reports I've seen have been positive).

This is Sony's new entry level DSLR model and depending on what you want to shoot, a more advanced model may be appropriate (for example, one with a faster 5fps frame rate for sports, or more dedicated controls for faster access to some functions, a larger viewfinder, or features that are missing like Depth of Field preview and more).*

Depending on what you want to shoot, and the conditions you want to shoot in, your lenses are going to be more important than the camera body.*

So, I'd give members a better idea of what you're looking for a camera to do for better responses (along with a desired budget).

Yes, the A200 has a hotshoe.* But, it's not an ISO standard shoe.** So, you'd need to use a flash model that's compatible with it (for example, the Minolta 2500, 3600HS, 5600HS; Sony HVL-36AM, HVL-42AM, HVL-56AM).** Sigma, Metz and Sunpak also make some flash models designed to work with Konica Minolta and Sony DSLR models (both use the same hotshoe design and flash protocol).

If you need an ISO standard foot for a non-dedicated flash, you can get an adapter like this one (and this one also gives you a PC Sync Port, since the A200 does not have a PC Sync Port built in).

http://www.gadgetinfinity.com/produc...cat=275&page=1

Jim, I read in an A200 review that it does have a dedicated depth of field button, it just doesn't have the "Live View" feature. Is this correct?

Thanks.
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Old Mar 3, 2008, 7:31 AM   #8
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The A200 does not have Depth of Field preview (the A100 does, but not the new A200), and it does not have Live View.

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Old Mar 3, 2008, 7:36 AM   #9
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JimC wrote:
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The A200 does not have Depth of Field preview (the A100 does, but not the new A200), and it does not have Live View.
Ok, but on http://www.dpreview.com/news/0801/08...nydslra200.asp it says in the specifications that it has a dedicated button for depth of field preview.

Thanks.
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Old Mar 3, 2008, 8:04 AM   #10
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They're wrong. No DOF preview button for the A200. They probably assumed that the A200 has it, since the A100 has it. But, Sony left off this feature in the newer model.

Personally, I wouldn't care (it's not a feature I normally use) I think DOF preview is probably one of the least used features available on an SLR or DSLR.

It works by closing down the aperture iris in the lens to the setting you are going to use to take a photo. The idea is so that you can tell how your setttings impact Depth of Field (since without DOF preview, the aperture is going to stay wide open until you take the photo). But, in practice, it's difficult to judge DOF that way from my experience trying to use it. It's not a feature I'd miss.



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