Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > What Camera Should I Buy?

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Mar 27, 2008, 8:51 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
mtclimber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Oregon, USA
Posts: 18,143
Default

Quite honestly, I don't really want to rain on anyone's parade. However, I have noticed a huge rush toward Consumer Level DSLR cameras. The camera manufacturers love to sell those DSLR cameras. It really makes their bottomline look extremely good.

But perhaps, it might be very important to ask quite simply, what exactly are you looking for in a DSLR camera? If you really want to shoot some great shots in a very low light environment, as in Theater Photography, then I will give you a resounding yes, a DSLR camera is the correct answer. However, if you are just looking to record those great family vacations, the trips to Disneyland, the graduation events, and the like, perhaps you could save a whole lot of money by just staying with a very good and very capable point and shoot digicam. You would also gain another benefit. Your camera kit would weigh a lot less and be much smaller in size. Now, that might be a desireable bonus!

I am just posing these questions; (1) Have you really looked at all ofyour camera options realistically? (2) Are you ready to get deeply involved in a markedly intense learning curve, so that you will get the very most out of your Consumer Level DSLR camera?

Where am I coming from? Well, I am a professional digital camera instructor who does more and more DSLR Camera Workshops than Digicam Workshops. I have been in this business for 50+ years, so I have a good deal of experience to draw upon in making this post. I will make no money from urging you away from a Consumer Level DSLR camera. In truth, all I am tryiing to do is to save you some good, hard, cash in the USA's already decilning economy.

I am asking you to be a bit more precise in identifying your camera needs. It might really save you a lot of bucks. I am willing to discuss the topic, in detail,if you are. If nobody makes any posts. Well, that OK too. This is a Forum to help folks.

Sarah Joyce


mtclimber is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Mar 27, 2008, 10:03 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Hawgwild's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Pensacola, Florida
Posts: 3,525
Default

Sarah,

Good post. I know that your post really requires no reply, but I couldn't help myself. I remember back a few years (Forty to be exact), I developed an interest in photography. I went through, for a few years, the instamatic and the 110 film cameras, but when I saw someone shooting with an SLR, I wanted one. This was in 1969. My cameras were all Canon except one Konica Autoreflex T. I had an F-1, Pellix, FTB, and finally, in 1981, an AE-1. Why am I even rambling on about this? I knew that all the pros used medium and large format cameras, so I deduced that all 35mm was for people like me, amateurs. I discovered that my photography improved quite a bit over the instamatics, probably because I wanted my skill level to at least equal my camera equipment. I think the move to SLR put me more in tune with my "inner photographer".

I know we've heard from different people that the camera only records the image, it is we the photographers who actually "take" the picture. And no one knows better than yourself that, all other things being equal, better equipment will render better photos. While there are many, many people who will always be content to merely point and shoot, there are others who will be restless, eager to do more and more, which will require a camera more adaptable to their ever changing needs. What better camera than an SLR? (according to Canon, Nikon, et al)

Every business that sells anything relies on markets--people willingtobuy, and people whomust be sold to. The major camera makers are in fierce competition and will sell to the market they have or the one they will create. It's bigger than you or me Sarah....

Robert
Hawgwild is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 28, 2008, 12:57 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
mtclimber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Oregon, USA
Posts: 18,143
Default

I agree, Robert-

Thanks for your intuitive post.

Sarah Joyce
mtclimber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 28, 2008, 1:17 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
Calicajun's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Quartz Hill, CA
Posts: 3,455
Default

Good post, I agree that a high end P&S is all that a lot of people need, I have some great (IMO:lol looking 12"x18" prints from a Sony F717 P&S camera.
Calicajun is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 28, 2008, 9:21 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
mtclimber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Oregon, USA
Posts: 18,143
Default

Calicajun-

That is exactly the point I was attempting to make.

Sarah Joyce
mtclimber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 28, 2008, 10:10 AM   #6
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 12
Default

I think the problem for most, myself included, is I do know what I want or need. trying to wade thought the hundreds of cameras available and all the features, jargon and sales pitches has just confused me all the more lol. I know that I have bought 4 digital cameras (returned one because of poor performance) and the performance of those cameras has been ok but when wanting to get better all round performance it is hard to tell which camera is right for me when I do not even know what I need lol. I guess I would be a somewhat easy mark for a salesman with a great performing dslr. But with some of the guidence on here I hope to get the right camera for me.
saski is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 28, 2008, 10:48 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
mtclimber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Oregon, USA
Posts: 18,143
Default

saski-

You are very correct in your statement. That is why Forums such as this one are sovaluable. It saves you from becoming a mark for a sharp salesman. And a good many of us enjoy sharing information and tips on cameras.

Sarah Joyce
mtclimber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 28, 2008, 1:57 PM   #8
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 49
Default

Sarah your thoughts and post should be made into a sticky on every digital photography forum/site. It transcends brand names and dollars and gets to the core answer of every inquiry I have ever heard about "should I get this" question.

While I am in no way shape or form an expert, I do understand (At the base level mind you) the principles of photography. And I have found them very helpful in making my purchase decision(s).

I had 4 P&S cameras until a friend of mine decided to upgrade his 300D for the Xti and made me an offer I could not pass up, even though I was content or so I thought with my limits using a P&S model.

Well let me tell you, in didn't take many shots with that old Rebel and the 28-135mm IS to realize that my "average" shots were just smoking my best shots with my P&S camera like a cheap cigar. And from their I was hooked in the Dslr realm.

Bear in mind that I had an idea of how to use the camera unlike some folks I know who just think that a better camera takes better shots. Kind of like the person who thinks that just because they have Adobe Premiere they are ready to compete with George Lucas by just loading the software and clicking away with their mouse.

That was well over a year ago and several buy/sell deals later I am now using a 40D. Do I think my pictures are better just by nature of the equipment? Heck no. Do I think that with practice and the understanding of the equipment they will get better? Heck yes.

My biggest challenge right now (And for the never ending future) is getting the camera to see the same thing I do. Anyone know where the tutorial for that interface/action is?

I have been fortunate enough to have been in the position to obtain the hardware I have. My bills are still paid, my lifestyle in still the same and I don't see my financial future being at risk from my purchases.

Photography skills aside I am also knowledgeable (as well as lucky) enough to understand the resale value of the hardware. I know that if I opt to get out of this I will lose a meager portion of my investment since I bargain hunted EVERTHING I bought and I know what the going rate for these items are on Ebay, Craigslist, etc.

Thank goodness for coupons and rebates!!!!

Riktar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 28, 2008, 2:16 PM   #9
Member
 
mweb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 93
Default

Quite agree with Sarah, i graduated from using D30/D60 and 350d SLR cameras in recent years and i never quite felt comfortable with any SLR.
Just because consumer SLR's are now starting at the £250 price point does NOT make them the de facto choice for everyone.

mweb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 28, 2008, 2:42 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
mtclimber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Oregon, USA
Posts: 18,143
Default

Good points from ricktar and mweb-

If you are going to with a consumer level DSLR camera, then you have to make a serious committment of your time and brain power to learn the craft of photography in much more serious detail.

However, if you don't make that committment, your image quality might be no better than in the old Point & Shoot days.

You also have to really be aware that a DSLR camera is sort of a continuing investment program. The DSLR camera body and kit lens is only an initial beginning. There are going to be continuing costs for lenses and accessories.

OTOH, a Point & Shoot camera has a much more defined investment scenario.

Sarah Joyce
mtclimber is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:25 PM.