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Old Jun 30, 2008, 9:22 PM   #11
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I have the G9, and I like it a lot, but it cannot produce the higher quality images of a DSLR at higher ISO settings, nor is it as fast when taking pictures. I don't want to carry around a large camera kit, so I opted for the G9.

I have been giving some thought to the Oly E-420 lately. It's got a smaller image sensor than the larger DSLRs, but still can take clean, quality pictures, compared to my G9. It can be purchased with the 25mm pancake lens to make it nice and small, but you pay about $100+ more than with the basic kit zoom lens. Here's a link to a review site that uses real-world photos to show the camera's performance. You also check their other reviews for more direct image comparisons with other DSLRs.

http://www.cameralabs.com/reviews/Olympus_E-420/ (click the pink tabs above the narratives to see the various sections, esp. the Gallery shots)

The E-420 with the kit lens is about $530 on Amazon, and with the pancake lens it's about $655. The E-420 does not have image stabilization, but then my old film SLR didn't either. We compensated by using faster shutter speeds, and as long as you can increase the ISO without adding a lot of image noise, then you are okay. I get noise with my G9 when I do that, and I have to do it sometimes even with IS on the G9.

Dennis
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Old Jul 1, 2008, 5:02 AM   #12
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I am hearing alot of people say the learning curve is steep, and that I will need multiplelenses to take great photos like I see on the net of these models. Is this true? I dont want to ave to invest more $$$ into lenses, flashes etc etc. I am looking for the one camera that will take great photos out of the box in my price range. Do I need to save up and buy into a more expensive model? Or are DSLR's not the choice for me?



What is LIVEVIEW??
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Old Jul 1, 2008, 7:04 AM   #13
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DSLR's have many options and it will take a while to become familiar with all of them. But they also have Auto settings like point and shoot cameras, which you can use 100% of the time if you choose to. The biggest weakness (to me) of a DSLR is that you can't get one lens that will give you both short range macro shots and long zoom capability, as you can do in a point and shoot ultrazoom. Also, the long zoom lenses tend to be large and heavy.

Live view is like the LCD of a point and shoot camera - you can use it to frame your shot. Until recently you could only frame your shots with a DSLR's optical viewfinder - the LCD could not be used for that purpose.
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Old Jul 1, 2008, 9:47 AM   #14
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So far everyone has been pretty much considering only DSLRs. Your original camera is a small shirt-pocket size. How about considering a shirt-pocket sized version of the G9, the SD950 IS? It lacks the manual controls of the G9, but has the 12MP sensor. It goes for about $330 on Amazon right now. Here's a link with photos from it;

http://fiveprime.org/hivemind/Tags/sd950

Dennis
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Old Jul 1, 2008, 10:20 AM   #15
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BostonBull wrote:
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I am looking at upgrading my current camera. I have a Sony DSC W100. I like it but want better photo quality. I would prefer a pocket style, but will consider all. I think my price range puts me out of good Dslr?
As already mentioned, you can get a Sony DSLR-A200 for $499.99 now, including an 18-70mm f/3.5-5.6 DT AF kit lens. That lens would give you the same angle of view you'd have using a 27-105mm lens on a 35mm camera. You have to multiply the focal length of a lens by 1.5x on this camera model to see what lens you need on a 35mm camera for the same angle of view (i.e., lenses will appear to be 1.5x longer because the APS-C size sensor is smaller than 35mm film).

Your existing W100 has a zoom range that's equivalent to a 35-114mm lens on a 35mm camera. So, there's not that much difference (35mm equivalent focal range of 27-105mm with the A200's kit lens versus 35-114mm with your W100's lens), other than the A200's kit lens would start out a bit wider to make it easier to fit more into the frame without backing up as much, and it doesn't go quite as long.

It's definitely not a pocket camera though. You can get an "all in one" type lens for more zoom range if desired. For example, a Sony 18-250mm f/3.5-6.3 lens would give you the same angle of view you'd have using a 27-375mm lens on a 35mm camera in a relatively compact lens design. But, it runs around $499 now (lens only). You'll usually get better quality using a lens with a less ambitious focal range from wide to long though.

In a smaller and lighter non-dSLR camera, I'd check out Steve's Best Cameras List , where you'll find models deemed to be a good value within their market niche. Make sure to read the review conclusion (last page for the sample images in each review) for information on how a model stacks up (image quality indoors and outdoors, Autofocus Speed, etc.).

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Old Jul 1, 2008, 5:25 PM   #16
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After reviewing the new posts and seeing the photos in Steve's reviews, I am back to seriously considering the G9. The photos are basically as good as the A200 w/kit lens and it is smaller and seems easier to use for a newbie (or so it seems from te reviews?)

I feel that if I don't buy at least 1 maybe 2 extra lenses, or learn how to doctor up my photos after taking them, a DSLR is not the right camera for me......am I wrong?



Is there other camera's that offer what the G9 offers, size, price, pic quality that I should consider?



Back and forth back and forth!
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Old Jul 1, 2008, 7:01 PM   #17
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The Sony A200 takes much better photos than the G9 at higher ISO's. The Sony at 1600 ISO is better than the G9 at 800 ISO and the Sony can actually take good looking photos at 3200 ISO.
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Old Jul 1, 2008, 7:13 PM   #18
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With the kit lens and as easy to learn how to use? All this talk from the prs about dSLR is making me VERY reluctant to own one right now. Seems like I will need some extra money to make it take good photos in all situations?



Exlain the ISO thing to me if you dont mind. I am a real Newb to the camera lingo and what it means. My Sony claims 1250 ISO?
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Old Jul 1, 2008, 7:52 PM   #19
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ISO refers to the sensitivity of the sensor. In the days of film cameras the film used to come in different sensitivities, 100 ASA, 200 ASA, 400 ASA, with the higher ASA's used in low light situations to make the photo brighter. When digital cameras came about ASA was changed to ISO but it essentially means the same thing.

It's best to shoot with the lowest sensitivity possible as, when you increase sensitivity, you also increase digital noise, which appears as graininess or speckles. Shooting outdoors in good light allows you to use low ISO's like 80 or 100. When you shoot in low light, however, the photo will be too dark unless the ISO is raised. Most point and shoots start to show appreciable noise at 400 ISO and it gets worse at 800 ISO. Some point and shoots can go higher, but the picture quality at 1200 or 1600 ISO will be terrible - it will look like a watercolor painting. DSLR's have a larger sensor and can take pictures with low noise at much higher ISO's. The Sony A200 is not considered to be great at higher ISO's compared to other DSLR's, but it still takes a nice picture at 1600 ISO.
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Old Jul 1, 2008, 8:00 PM   #20
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Thanks that clears it up! Do I need to know what every seting is and how to use it to get good pics with a dSLR? Or is auto mode, like on my point and shoot fine?



This link was sent to me. Do any of these compare to or exceed the G9? http://www.pcworld.com/article/id,123679/article.html
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