Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > What Camera Should I Buy?

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Jul 1, 2008, 10:17 PM   #21
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Marquette, MI
Posts: 285
Default


BostonBull wrote:
Quote:
Thanks that clears it up! Do I need to know what every seting is and how to use it to get good pics with a dSLR? Or is auto mode, like on my point and shoot fine?


This link was sent to me. Do any of these compare to or exceed the G9? http://www.pcworld.com/article/id,123679/article.html
You can get by with full auto on most cameras, dSLR or P&S. However, I don't get the best out of my G9 unless I take the time to study the many optional settings, practice with them, and learn from my mistakes. Nothing ventured, nothing gained.

The G9 has it's limits, and so do dSLRs. The G9 has a smaller sensor than the dSLRs, so it cannot achieve the same outcome with photos, but it can come close in good light, and in the hands of knowledgeable people.

The list of cameras on the PC World link are all ultra-zoom P&S cameras. To the best of my knowledge they all have smaller image sensors than the G9, so they will tend to produce more noise at higher ISOs. It comes with the smaller sensors, no way around it really. If you wanted to get an ultra-zoom P&S, then there is also the newer Nikon P80 that some like, but it is not on the PC World listing.

Dennis
denncald is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 2, 2008, 5:47 AM   #22
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 18
Default

denncald wrote:
Quote:
BostonBull wrote:
Quote:
Thanks that clears it up! Do I need to know what every seting is and how to use it to get good pics with a dSLR? Or is auto mode, like on my point and shoot fine?


This link was sent to me. Do any of these compare to or exceed the G9? http://www.pcworld.com/article/id,123679/article.html
Quote:
You can get by with full auto on most cameras, dSLR or P&S. However, I don't get the best out of my G9 unless I take the time to study the many optional settings, practice with them, and learn from my mistakes. Nothing ventured, nothing gained.

The G9 has it's limits, and so do dSLRs. The G9 has a smaller sensor than the dSLRs, so it cannot achieve the same outcome with photos, but it can come close in good light, and in the hands of knowledgeable people.

The list of cameras on the PC World link are all ultra-zoom P&S cameras. To the best of my knowledge they all have smaller image sensors than the G9, so they will tend to produce more noise at higher ISOs. It comes with the smaller sensors, no way around it really. If you wanted to get an ultra-zoom P&S, then there is also the newer Nikon P80 that some like, but it is not on the PC World listing.

Dennis
Quote:
Not interested in ultra zooms really.
Quote:
I am interested in whatever camera will be the easiest to learn to use, and take the best photos in stock form. I have twins on the way so a $600 camera and then extra lenses, flashes, etc etc isnt going to fly for me.
BostonBull is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 2, 2008, 9:05 AM   #23
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

What is it that you find limiting with your existing Sony W100?

Is the focal range (zoom range) OK with it for most uses?

I see where you were not interested in an ultra zoom type camera. So, you may be just fine with a kit lens on a dSLR. For example, the Sony A200's kit lens would give you a 35mm equivalent focal range of around 27-105mm (which would allow you to get more in the frame in closer quarters compared to your existing Sony, since you may not always be able to back up far enough). That can come in handy for group photos indoors, etc.; and the long end of the zoom range isn't that much different (35mm equvalent of 105mm with the A200's kit lens, versus 114mm with your existing Sony W100).

There are going to be some differences between how a model like the Canon G9 you're looking at processes the images. This type of camera will tend to have more saturated images, with more sharpening applied in camera by default (and I personally like a less aggresive approach, but some users are fine with that kind of processing).

But, you can change the settings on a dSLR for a similar look and feel if desired. For example, look at the A300 photos one of our members posted after making some tweaks to the settings in this thread (and the A200 uses the same sensor and image processing algorithms):

Sony A300 first impression and pics

The Sony A200 would also have much better dynamic range compared to the G9. That means it can capture a greater range of bright to dark. Ditto for noise levels (much lower).

As for extras, for best results, you'll want an external flash, regardless of the model you choose for the indoor photos. But, you could still use the built flash with either camera.

If size and weight are important, the P&S models are a better bet. But, the overall image quality is superior from the dSLR offerings. You'll need some experience with either camera to get best results, and a dSLR will take some getting used to.

I'd try them out in a store and see what you think before making any kind of decision. You want a model you're comfortable with.


JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 2, 2008, 2:28 PM   #24
Senior Member
 
mtclimber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Oregon, USA
Posts: 18,143
Default

You have received some excellent advise on this thread. IMO you have to decide if the added size and complexity of a camera like the Sony A-200 fits well with your personal desires.

If simplicity and size take priority, then take a look at something like the Sony H-10 which is very small 8.0 mp and has an excellent flash range.

Sarah Joyce
mtclimber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 2, 2008, 9:24 PM   #25
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Marquette, MI
Posts: 285
Default

Here's a review of the Sony A200 that talks about how easy it is to use in Auto mode (about 2/3rds of the way down under "Shooting"), as you have been asking about;

http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/AA200/AA200A.HTM

Dennis
denncald is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 2, 2008, 9:42 PM   #26
Senior Member
 
mtclimber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Oregon, USA
Posts: 18,143
Default

At this point it might be very important to restate the original question.

"What is the best $400 to $500 Camera"

BostonBull, you have received excellent advice in this thread. The Sony A-200, at its current price, represents a very good camera value. Dennis also provided an excellent review of the Sony A-200 and its handling.

I guess where we and you go from here is essentially up to you. There are few other DSLR choices out there, that offer as much value as the Sony A-200. So perhaps the next step in this thread might indeed be up to you.

Sarah Joyce
mtclimber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 2, 2008, 10:06 PM   #27
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 18
Default

Thanks for everythng so far guys!!



My wife and I are going to look at the G9, A200, and maybe one or two others tomorrow or Friday. I want to feel them, hold them, take some shots in the store etc etc etc.



JimC



I was never really happy with my W100 as far aspicture quality. I never really got it dialed in either so I only shot on manual mode. Now it has been crushed and will no longer work and I dont see the point in having it fixed.
BostonBull is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 3, 2008, 8:38 PM   #28
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 18
Default

I had the chance to play around with my Mother in Laws Cannon G3 today. I feel this takes FAR superior pictures to my Sony DSC-W100. This camera is 3-4 years older than my old Sony and it still takes better shots. I am going to look at the G9 tomorrow, and based on the size of that and the A200, that will b the deciding factor. If my newbie eyes think the older G3 takes way better photos, I dont think I willnotice the difference in the G9 and A200.



What are the IQ differences between the G3 and the G9?
BostonBull is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 3, 2008, 9:01 PM   #29
Senior Member
 
mtclimber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Oregon, USA
Posts: 18,143
Default

BostonBull-

I sincerely think that you are confusing the real issues here. The larger imager size on the Sony A-200 will always take photos with much better image quality than a digicam like the Canon G-9 particularly at ISO settings above 400 because it uses a much smaller CCD type imager that is 12 to 15 times smaller than the Aps-C imager used on the Sony A-200.

I own a Canon G-7 and its image quality output is measurably less than my Sony A-200 without a doubt. However, the choice is entirely up to you. It seems that the physical size of the camera is becoming a big factor in your decision, not image quality.

Sarah Joyce
mtclimber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 3, 2008, 10:05 PM   #30
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 18
Default

What is the IQ difference between the G3 and the G9? How about the G3 and my W100? In your opinion?



I feel the G3 takes far better pics than my W100. So I imagine I will feel (with my ntrained eyes) that the G9 takes the absolute BEST pics ever......IMO! And yes camera sizer is a factor in mine and my wifesdecision.



I am going to look at the A200, and G9. I dont want to be overwhelned with learning settings, and controls. This will make me not want to use ANY camera, and hate the pictures it produces for the simple fact that its laborous. I dont want this, I want it to be fun to use and stress free. Not worrying about settings, lenses, flashes, and then editing.




BostonBull is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 6:26 AM.