Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > What Camera Should I Buy?

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Jul 13, 2008, 9:13 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 6
Default

I've had a Kodak z740 5MP for almost 2 years now. i love the 10x optical zoom, but the delay from shot to shot is almost 3 seconds, and it stinks in even slightly low light situations.to capture natural, no flash pics i have to go into manual settings and slow the shutter speed down so much that anything moving is a blur. i've been dying to make the jump to a DSLR, and have narrowed my search to the Rebel XSi and the D60. This month's Popular Photography magazine tested the top 5, and the Rebel slightly edged out the D60. But I thought i'd get some real opinions. My main questions/concerns are:

1. my Z740 maxes @ ISO400. How much better is the ISO1600 in real situatioins?

2. The zoom on the point and shoots cameras, like the 10x on mine: Am i gonna miss that when the stock lens is comperable to a 3x to 5x zoom? what kinda $$ will it take to compensate?

3. If i want to try professional-type portraits will either of these suffice (knowing i need a lot of other peripheral equipment).

i like to snap a little bit ofeverything, from nature to family gatherings. here are a couple of examples of my stuff:

http://www.caedes.net/Zephir.cgi?lib...1122850712.jpg

http://www.caedes.net/Zephir.cgi?lib...1131853926.jpg

http://www.caedes.net/Zephir.cgi?lib...1155518921.jpg

http://www.caedes.net/Zephir.cgi?lib...1155569605.jpg

And i just joined up, so forgive me if i broke any rules.



Thx in advance. i've been lurking for a while. there are some wise peoples on this forum.






MISTERSMIFF is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Jul 13, 2008, 10:56 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
deterpawson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 393
Default

well mister
you may wanna also check out the NIKON D80
you have some very good shots posted
if you are going nikon and have some older lenses they may not be entirely compatable
i believe the the D80 is made in Japan while the D60 is not, dunno if that makes a difference to you or not
however Nikon does affer a 2yr warranty while Canon is 1 yr
just some food for thought
good luck
deterpawson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 14, 2008, 12:35 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
mtngal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Frazier Park, CA
Posts: 16,056
Default

Either of these cameras are capable of taking excellent pictures. I shoot Pentax and think there's very little difference in image quality between all of the dSLRs offered today. One offersone feature while another offers something else, but if you are interested in general photos (your pictures look like you like landscapes and close-ups), any of them would do well.

1. As far as ISO 1600 - take a look at the sample pictures posted on Steve's reviews and take a look at the ISO 1600 examples. Then compare the full sized files with your ISO 400 pictures and you'll be able to see whether they are better than what your current camera is capable of. High ISO pictures partly depends on personal taste - some cameras offer greater noise reduction but smear details, while others process the pictures less, leaving more noise but also more detail. The advantage of ISO 1600 is that it allows you to use a faster shutter speed, something that's not very important for studio work (stationary subject and camera mounted on a tripod), but can be critical when shooting sports in low light.

2. Zoom is another personal choice. Try to forget about "10X" or "3X" - it doesn't tell you much about the lens. All it means is that the maximum focal length is 10 times or 3 times the minimum focal length. For instance, the 18-55 kit lens is a 3X lens (55/18=3), as is a 100-300mm lens (300/100=3). However, the 18-55 is a wide angle tomid telephoto, while the 100-300 is a mid to long telephoto lens - totally different. Kit lenses can do pretty well with flower close-ups. I could only read one of the landscape EXIF information, and that was at a longer focal length than the kit lens is capable of. I think it's a good idea to get the kit lens by itself first, shoot with it and see what you can't do with it before buying any more lenses. But it looks like you'll want to get a telephoto lens fairly soon.

3. Just my opinion (I'm not much of a people photographer so it's only an uneducated opinion) but the people pictures I like best have small depth of field (person sharp, background isn't), which usually means aperture number smaller than the kit lens is capable (i.e., f2, f1.8, f1.4, depending on the focal length). That means that the D40/D60 would NOT be a good choice as it won't auto focus with the current line-up of Nikon prime fast lenses. If you are going to be doing this either look at the D80 or one of the other dSLRs.

If the portrait work isn't going to happen for a couple of years, then you could buy the D60 and upgrade later on to whatever Nikon might come out to replace the D80 along with the fast prime (though fast primes are great fun in themselves and perhaps you'd want one or two sooner than a couple of years).
mtngal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 14, 2008, 9:35 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
rjseeney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Taylor Mill, Kentucky
Posts: 2,398
Default

Quote:
3. Just my opinion (I'm not much of a people photographer so it's only an uneducated opinion) but the people pictures I like best have small depth of field (person sharp, background isn't), which usually means aperture number smaller than the kit lens is capable (i.e., f2, f1.8, f1.4, depending on the focal length). That means that the D40/D60 would NOT be a good choice as it won't auto focus with the current line-up of Nikon prime fast lenses. If you are going to be doing this either look at the D80 or one of the other dSLRs
large apertures aren't the only element that creates the blurred background. Focal length and subject to background distance also help determine the degree of blurred background. Blurred backgrounds can be achieved even at f8 with a longer focal length and a longer subject to background distance. In reality, even the maximum aperture on the kit lenses will create a suitably blurred background.
rjseeney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 14, 2008, 9:56 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
TCav's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Washington, DC, Metro Area, Maryland
Posts: 13,572
Default

Both the Canon XSi and the Nikon D60 are fine cameras, but there are some differences between them that might make a difference to you. The Canon has:
  1. 12MP image sensor, which will allow you to cropduring post processing, and make bigger prints without as much pixelation.[/*]
  2. 'Live View', which allows you to compose your shot on the LCD Display as well as through the optical viewfinder.[/*]
  3. Faster autofocusing, for sports and action shots.[/*]
  4. Larger selection of lenses.
[/*]
While Nikon has a large selection of lenses, because the D60 doesn't have a built-in autofocus motor, many of its lenses won't autofocus on the D60. So you may want to consider the Nikon D80 instead in order to be able to take advantage ofNikon's extensive selection of lenses.

The lens in your Kodak Z740 is a fast lens, with a maximum aperture of f/2.8 at its shortest focal length and f/3.7 at its longest. That means, even though a dSLR will offer higher ISO settings than are available on your Z740, since a dSLR's kit lens will be dimmer than what you have now, you won't be getting much of an improvement in low light performance.


TCav is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 2:20 AM.