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Old Aug 3, 2008, 9:58 PM   #11
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mtclimber,

I agree that, under typical conditions, a high end P&S digicam can do as well as a dSLR, and maybe even make inroads in other areas.

The OP asked about dSLRs, and I presume that he is aware of the consequences, desireable as well as undesireable, of his choice. To be sure, it's not a bad idea to remind him of those consequences and other factors he may not be aware of.

At least he's not asking about a superzoom! [suB]:-)[/suB]
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Old Aug 3, 2008, 10:03 PM   #12
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On the average day, how often do you take a photo of that poor man?

Do you jump in, take a shot, and run away?

Is he an unsuspectingneighbor, and you take the photos through an open window?

How does he feel about it?

([suB]:-)[/suB])
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Old Aug 3, 2008, 10:25 PM   #13
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TCav-

As you state the case, "that man" is my husband of 51 years. Thanks to his unfailing patience,Bradley is always ready for me to take a photo of him with yet a different camera, from our collectionthat I might want to pul out to use for a sample photo. He is indeed my soulmate, who has long ago learned to put up with my fascination of cameras.

The only pointI am attempting to make here is simply this: there may indeed be a less expenive, and less bulky choice in camerasthat might produce images of equal qualitywith less bulk and less dollars. most folks don't really mind much when you are attempting to same them some hard earned USA Dollars.

And yes, if a DSLR camera is your very best choice, then perhaps there might be a very good and viable single lens choice. I know TCav you love your 17-50mm F 2.8 lens, but there are other options out there in the marketplace.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Aug 3, 2008, 10:33 PM   #14
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Thank you for reminding me that just because I have money to spend, it might be the best way to spend it.


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Old Aug 3, 2008, 10:42 PM   #15
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My nephew just returned from two weeks in Alaska. He came back with about 3,000 photos of wildlife. Some of the photos were unbelievable. He uses a Nikon D60 and a Sigma lens. I'm not sure of the specifics. It's my understanding that he's got about $2,000 worth of equipment including a telephoto, a macro, anda photo editing software package.

I decided to upgrade my camera because the photos I am taking with my little Canon Powershot won't stand up to the quality in a better camera.

I publish a few blogs and enjoy posting pictures. I have a food blog that gets 500 + visitors per day and for food the Powershot is fine. I know I don't need a better camera for those types of food shots.

However, for birds and other wildlife I've outgrown my Powershot. I'm looking for a hobby that my wife and I can enjoy together. We enjoy the beach and various sanctuaries available within a short drive of our house. She love my nephews pictures and we thought it would be fun to join in the fun.


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Old Aug 3, 2008, 11:10 PM   #16
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Sorry TCav - I should have said that my figures were based on keh's latest arrival list only. But your figures show about the same thing my figures did - keh hassimilar numbers of lenses for both platforms. I'm sure that some days its higher for Minolta and some days higher for Pentax. It wouldn't surprise me to see the Minolta number do the same thing Pentax numbers did when the K10 came out - availability to drop significantly and prices rise. That's why I brought up that it's probably a great idea to buy used lenses now, while prices are low and availability good.

Live view might be really useful for shooting wildlife with a tripod (assuming the lighting is such that you can see the LCD clearly). On the other hand, try holding a 3-6 lb. rock steadyat close to arms length, while trying to aim it at a bird on the other side of a pond,and making sure that the camera focuses on the wading bird and not the shoreline behind it. Add to that perhaps changing the aperture or shutter speed to match the conditions while you are holding out that rock. Live view, like IS, or anything else in photography, has it's uses andlimitations.
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Old Aug 4, 2008, 6:56 AM   #17
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mtngal wrote:
Quote:
...try holding a 3-6 lb. rock steadyat close to arms length, while trying to aim it at a bird on the other side of a pond,and making sure that the camera focuses on the wading bird and not the shoreline behind it. Add to that perhaps changing the aperture or shutter speed to match the conditions while you are holding out that rock. ...
Certainly an argument in favor of the smaller, lighter Olympus.

bpearcy10 wrote:
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However, for birds and other wildlife I've outgrown my Powershot. I'm looking for a hobby that my wife and I can enjoy together. We enjoy the beach and various sanctuaries available within a short drive of our house. She love my nephews pictures and we thought it would be fun to join in the fun.
Certainly an argumentin favor of the weathersealed Pentax.

You didn't think this was going to be easy, did you? [suB]:-)[/suB]



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Old Aug 4, 2008, 12:49 PM   #18
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A tip of the hat to you, bp-

It looks like you have thought out your planned purchase quite well, and I respect that a lot.

This thread has produced both some excellent ideas and some thoughts on how to make the best choice. Have a great day and enjoy the process.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Aug 4, 2008, 5:20 PM   #19
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For bird and wildlife photography a "bridge" camera is not a bridge at all. It's a rickety rope ladder strung across a gorge. No suitable for purpose.

They can be fantastic under the right conditions, but wildlife and bird photography is extremely demanding on equipment.

If you are even halfway serious about it you should be thinking about something like:

Sigma 50-500 EX + a decent Metz flashgun and better beamer + tripod/monopod depending on how strong and steady you are.

Then add a body of your choice, one from the entry level range if you must, Olympus 510, A200 or K200D. But better to look at a step up, in particular the Pentax K20D is an excellent buy and the E3 ain't too bad either.

Have a serious look at the cost of that setup: K20D + Sigma 50-500 + flash. See if you can stretch that far.

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Old Aug 4, 2008, 6:30 PM   #20
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Of course, all other thing being equal, there wouldn't be much difference between 500mm on an APS-C dSLR and 300mm on a 4/3 dSLR.
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