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Old Aug 10, 2008, 10:37 PM   #1
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I need to buy a camera to take medical photos of faces only.

Was looking at the Olympus E510 with ring flash.

Camera will be used by skin care specialist, so I want to make it as simple as possible.
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Old Aug 10, 2008, 11:26 PM   #2
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carpo-

Your plan may include a bit of overkill or over mechanization. One of the very best plastic surgeons in the world has found that high quality digicams such as the Sony H-50 can easily meet all of his needs. The key element is to keep all of the working parameters for taking the needed photos exactly the same.

When the lighting set-up needed for the required documaentary photos is very carefully controlled, then even well educated and experienced staff personnel can take very creditable and usable documentary photos needed for sucessful surgery documentation.

You might want to scale back your photographic requirements somewhat. The most important issue is to be able to constantly replicate the exact lighting of any documentary photo.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Aug 11, 2008, 3:14 AM   #3
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I personally don't like Olympus
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Old Aug 11, 2008, 3:25 AM   #4
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weing12 wrote:
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I personally don't like Olympus
any particular reasons? this is not really helpful.
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Old Aug 11, 2008, 8:21 AM   #5
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So you like the sony....what type of flash
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Old Aug 11, 2008, 8:22 AM   #6
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This system needs to be portable, so lighting, must be. That is why I was looking at ring flash. Photos are taken in basically identical rooms
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Old Aug 11, 2008, 1:45 PM   #7
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Carpo-

The Sony H-50 works well, butthe choice of the camera systemcould be any system that you prefer. What does need to be consistent is the lighting. In the case I was referring to (I was a patient), the first step was to increase the overhead flourescent lighting in the examination rooms, in this case it was doubled. Then, just the on camera or built-in flash was the only flash used. Particular care has to be taken to keep the camera to subject distance as consistent as possible. Initially floor markings were utilized to keep the camera to subject distance consistent.Then the camera's zoom feature is used to get over all as well as close-up photos.

The critical issue in this discussion seems to be the size of the area that you want to photograph. You may indeed have a need to photograph a rather small area like an incision, or suturing. Perhaps, that is the reason you were speaking about a DSLR camera and the ring flash. If you do not have a need to get very close to the photo site, then flash diffusers can be used to soften, and to spread the flash light over a wider area. Keep in mind that if you do decide to use a DSLR camera, and need to get rather close, that a specialized Macro Lens would be required.

I could of course be wrong, however, I believe the discussion can more effectively move ahead is we had a better idea of the size of the photo site size, and how far you desire the camera to be distance-wise from the photo site. The photo site in the case I was discussingvaried from6" by 6" to 12" by 12". That is a very important variable in medical photography. The other variable is how many different people will be doing the photgraphy. The system I was discussing was designed with the thought that multiple staff members would bedoing the photography and that the system had to be portable, moving from one examination room to another.

I hope this helps.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Aug 11, 2008, 1:48 PM   #8
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We shoot full face from multiple views. Need to have good detail, do not want to soften image. These, of course, are not portrait head shots, but to document the skin. Shooting distance would be the same, I would think depends on the camera/lens.
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Old Aug 11, 2008, 3:16 PM   #9
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carpcosmetic-

We are indeed then discussing the same kind/type of medical photography, the same approximate distances camera to subject, and the same desire for facial shapness and good detail.

The question then, are these: (1) will there be multiple staffmembers doing the photography. We ran into a situation where the multiple staff members were much more comfortable with the Sony H-50 rather than a much more foreboding and substantially heavier DSLR camera equipped with a ring flash and its accompanying tethering cord or attachment point to the DSLR camera. The majority of the staffmembers felt familiar and at ease with the H-50 and it excellent tilting LCD screen. However, as I mentioned previously, the camera choice is entirely up to you.

(2) Is your intent that the entire light source for your photos will emmanate from the ring flashmounted on the DSLR alone? To create a more replicatable photo lighting environment, as I noted before, we chose to measurably increase the lighting level in each examination room, and to depend on the H-50's ownbuilt-in flash for the final needed lighting. The result was a photo environment that both patients and staffmembers were more familiar with and more comfortable with, as the resulting needed flash was about the same one would expect when taking normal family snapshots.

In the final analysis, the camera selection, the photo taking environment,and lighting selection is entirely up to you in every way. I have just attempted to share with you how another well ranked surgeon, when faced with the same type of medical photography, created his own solution.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Aug 11, 2008, 4:24 PM   #10
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I cannot really change the lighting in the rooms. They are treatment/facial/skin care rooms in our spa. Thats why I am looking at the ring flash. The camera would just need to be the most appropriate for that flash. That is why I was looking at DSLR. Certainly, the less complicated the better.
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