Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > What Camera Should I Buy?

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Aug 24, 2008, 12:34 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 3
Default

I have a wonderful SRT 201 that I purchased in the 70's while in the Air Force. This camera has gone everywhere with me and is reaching the end of its life. I love the basic TTL metering, manual controls etc. I would love to find a dslr that has the manual feel of my old Minolta. I really dont care about all of the other features (that I may or may not ever get to play with) I just want a good, solid manual ap/focus/speed dslr. Menus controlled by buttons dismay me...give me a ring to twist anyday
Any body versed with an old workhorse such as the srt and the newer technology of the dslrs out there with advice?
ex99125b is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Aug 24, 2008, 1:14 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
mtclimber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Oregon, USA
Posts: 18,143
Default

ex-

I am afraid that while most DSLR cameras have the ability to manual zoom, but aperture and shutter speeds have be re-located inside, and are button or command dial actuated.

Sarah Joyce
mtclimber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 24, 2008, 3:38 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
TCav's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Washington, DC, Metro Area, Maryland
Posts: 13,543
Default

One of the things you'll notice is that much of what you did by hand with your SRT-201 is automatic with today's dSLRs. Exposure and focusing are done by the camera better and fasterthan most people were capable of manually. As much as you might yearn for the good old days, these newer, faster, better cameras are a welcome addition.

And I want you to know that this is coming from someone who finally gave up his SRT-202 for a dSLR.

The best part of going digital is that you don't have to wait for, and pay for developing! Another is that you won't have to reload film nearly as often, so you'll catch more shots, and since you don't have to wait for processing, you can take more shots without worrying about if they turned out, and you'll become a better photographer. That's good!

I think the one stumbling block will be the size of the new cameras. They are very different to hold and operate. I think a big part of your decision should be how the camera feels to you. Try to spend some time in a camera store (not a BB, CC, or WallyWorld) to see what the different cameras feel like to you.
Attached Images
 
TCav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 24, 2008, 4:25 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
algold's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Israel
Posts: 369
Default

If you still want a retro style turn dials for aperture and shutter speed and are willing to pay for the luxury to have it - have a look at the now discontinued I believe Panasonic L-1 or Leica Digilux 3, which is based on L-1. Both are overpriced :-) and the body styling is far from traditional, but at least you have a choice.
Another option is Leica M8 - not a DSLR, but a digital rangefinder, one of a kind.

http://us.leica-camera.com/photograp...tem/digilux_3/

To be honest, the controls of most of the modern DSLRs aren't that difficult to master, but it's your money and your decision.
Alex
algold is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 24, 2008, 4:32 PM   #5
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 3
Default

can you play with depth of field with an auto dslr? Part of the attraction of manual is playing off the speed/aperture, can this be done in a fairly quick manner or is it a matter of getting ones glasses, selecting the appropriate menu, selecting the setting etc? i wouldnt mind repeatedly pressing a single function aperture button or a single function speed button and veiwing a TTL meter, but a multi function button scares me. I have a point and shoot (cannon powershot S30) and to try and take creative liberties with manual exposures s an exercise in frustration, not to mention time consuming.

Am I being a flat earther here?

by the way, I really appreciate the time you all have taken to answer my question
ex99125b is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 24, 2008, 4:33 PM   #6
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

The controls on most modern dSLR models are easier to use than they look.

For example, if you like Av mode, with most models you just turn the mode dial to that position, and you can spin a dial on the camera to change apertures (and you'll see the selected aperture, as well as the shutter speed in the viewfinder with most models, so you can make changes without ever taking your eye away from the viewfinder).

Or, if you like Manual Exposure, set the mode dial that way. With some models, you have separate dials for Aperture and Shutter speed (for example, a dial on the back of the camera and a dial on the front of the camera), and with some models, the same command dial doubles for both (so, you just press an extra button while spinning a dial to step between the desired aperture or shutter speeds settings); all without taking your eye from the viewfinder.

As previously mentioned, test drive some in a store and see what feels better to you.

JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 24, 2008, 5:00 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
algold's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Israel
Posts: 369
Default

As JimC has said, it depends on the particular brand and model. Usually basic (budget/beginners) DSLRs are closer to P&S cameras in their controls and you have to use menus and press more buttons to change camera settings. Mid-level prosumer cameras have easier to use and navigate menus and more logical controls with less button pushing involved. For example, with my Canon 40D I can change most of the settings without using menus and taking my eye from the viewfinder, with my old 350D I have to go to the menus and look at the LCD to change most of the settings. Both have a DOF privew button right next to the lens mount, if this is what you mean.
the best thing to do is to go to a good camera store and play with a few different models in your price range, just don't forget to decide what you want to shoot and which lenses you will need to do it well and to take their price into account when you set your budget. At the end the price of your camera body(-ies) will be 1/3 to 1/10 of your total investment :-)
algold is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 24, 2008, 6:56 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
TCav's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Washington, DC, Metro Area, Maryland
Posts: 13,543
Default

ex99125b wrote:
Quote:
can you play with depth of field with an auto dslr? Part of the attraction of manual is playing off the speed/aperture, can this be done in a fairly quick manner or is it a matter of getting ones glasses, selecting the appropriate menu, selecting the setting etc?
For dSLRs that have it, the depth of field preview button works just like the Stop Down button on your SRT-201. But while you adjusted the aperture with the aperture ring on your lens, on a dSLR, you adjust the aperture using a control on the camera body.
TCav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 24, 2008, 8:34 PM   #9
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 3
Default

thank you all for replying, it is clear that my next asignment is to do some shopping. At least I have an idea that I can come fairly close to what I want without drilling down through endles menus like my PTS.

Shopping I go. If anyone has any camera recommendations for starting my search, Id be glad to hear them.

thanks again

ex99125b is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 24, 2008, 8:58 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
VTphotog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Extreme Northeastern Vermont, USA
Posts: 4,214
Default

Most DSLRs can be used manually, as can some advanced digicams. I went from SRT-102 to a D7hi Minolta digicam, now discontinued, as is Minolta. When moving to DSLR, I went through all the same questions, and in preference to newer cameras, bought a Pentax *istD. I have learned to use it automatically, as well as still being able to have full manual control. It will probably take some time for you to go over all the various features of the different models, but worthwhile if you have specific needs or wants.

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"brian
VTphotog is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 4:12 PM.