Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > What Camera Should I Buy?

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Sep 4, 2008, 1:00 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 6
Default

Is there any reason I should not buy this camera kit?



http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...:IT&ih=004
markesq is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Sep 4, 2008, 1:39 PM   #2
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

No (I don't know of a reason not to buy it), unless you have any special requirements and the camera is going to limit you in some way. It is an older 6MP camera model, and the included lenses are not worth much. But, it's a well liked camera body, with more flexibility than you'd have with one of the current Nikon entry level bodies, since models like the D40, D40x and D60 don't have focus motors built in, limiting your lens choices).

Cameta is a reputable vendor. You'll find that many of our members purchased cameras like that from them (i.e., sold as "Factory Demo"). I suspect that most of them are Factory Refurbished and they like to call them "Factory Demo" instead. lol

Anyway, most of the reports I've seen from members indicate that shutter count is usually very low on Nikon models they've purchased from Cameta that way.

Nikon's warranty is only 90 days on Factory Refurbished Gear. But, apparently, Cameta is covering these models for a full year.

I've personally purchased refurbished gear from Cameta more than once in the past.
For example, I bought my Minolta 24-85mm f/3-4.5 and Minolta 28mm f/2 Autofocus Lenses from them. They advertised these as Factory Demo if memory serves.

I've got the box from my 28mm f/2 right in front of me now (I spotted it on a shelf and grabbed it). It says this on the box (but, Sony handles Minolta warranty and service now).

Quote:
This product is not new.
It has been inspected, tested and
reconditioned to factory specifications by
Minolta Corporation
101 Williams Drive, Ramsey, NJ 07446 USA

6-MONTH-LIMITED WARRANTY
Note that Nikon provides 90 days on their factory reconditioned gear. But, Cameta apparently covers them for longer, and since they are not grey market (the gear Cameta sells is intended for sale in the U.S.), Nikon USA will service them if that service is being paid for.

Most Ebay vendors selling Nikon gear are selling grey market gear (not intended for sale in the U.S.), using misleading listings like "USA Warranty", when they mean a store warranty. Nikon USA will usually refuse to service a Nikon camera that was not intended for sale in the U.S., even if you are willing to pay for the service. So, be careful of vendors selling Nikon gear at prices that look too low.

Cameta also sells new gear, and has some good deals from time to time.

The lenses included with that D70s kit are very inexpensive lenses. So, don't get too excited with their descriptions. In addition, you may find that 28mm isn't wide enough for some conditions with a dSLR, since you'll have a narrower angle of view (more apparent magnifcation) using a lens on a camera with an APS-C size sensor. So, a 28mm lens on this type of dSLR would be like using a 42mm lens on a 35mm camera. You have to multiple the focal length of a lens by 1.5x to see how they compare from an angle of view perspective (28mm x 1.5 = 42mm). That's why the kit lenses on most dSLR models start out at around 18mm now. But, if you're not in close quarters where you may not be able to back up enough to get what you want in the frame, you may be just fine with one starting out at 28mm (many users are), and you could always buy another lens later if you decided you needed something different.

What do you want to shoot (and in what conditions, since indoors without a flash, or night sports in a stadium would require a very different kit compared to taking photos outdoors in good light).

JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 4, 2008, 3:05 PM   #3
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 6
Default

Mostly going to shoot people, scenery, general family type photos. Indoor and out.
markesq is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 4, 2008, 3:31 PM   #4
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

Indoors with those lenses (assuming no tripod and/or non-stationary subjects), just make sure to use a flash (and an external flash like the Nikon SB-600 and SB800 are best so that you can bounce them for more even lighting).

If you're on a really tight budget, that looks like a pretty good deal for what they want for it, and you could buy additional lenses if you needed something else later (for example, a Nikkor 50mm f/1.8 Autofocus lens for that camera model is less than $100 now at some vendors, which would give you a much brighter lens compared to the lenses included in that kit).

If you wanted a higher resolution model with pretty good "bang for the buck", I'd probably look at something like the Sony A200 instead (a 10MP model). It's around $499.99 now including an 18-70mm f/3.5-5.6 kit lens. If you added a lens like that Tamron 70-300mm, you'd spend about $150 more (although you can find them for less).

The Nikon body you're looking at is actually a better body compared to most entry level models though (build quality, feature set, etc.). It's just an older model with lower resolution compared to some of the current entry level models. But, that's probably not a big deal unless you're printing at larger sizes or cropping your photos much. 6MP is plenty for most shooters.

JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 4, 2008, 3:33 PM   #5
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 6
Default

I bought it and changed out the lenses.The 2 lenses I have now are a Nikon 18-55 and a Nikon 70-300. Better lenses I hope. It also reduced the price by $30. :-)
markesq is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 4, 2008, 3:56 PM   #6
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

well... the Nikkor 18-55mm is still an entry level lens. Ditto for the Nikkor 70-300mm (I'd proabably be inclined to keep the Tamron 70-300mm instead, since it can focus at closer distances if needed).

However, you're really not going to see much difference in quality between the entry level zooms like that.

To get significantly better results, you'll need to invest more money in better lenses.

But, for what you're paying for a package including a decent camera body, you're getting a good deal from my perspective. Even though it may not have the latest and greatest 10MP sensor, etc. it's a better camera body compared to other models you'll find new for what you're spending, and you can always buy more lenses (if you even need them) later. I'm also a fan of the Transcend 133x Compactflash card they're including in that kit(I'm using a 16GB 133x Transcend CompactFlash card in my cameras right now), but it's not worth much anymore since memory card prices have dropped a lot lately.


JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 4, 2008, 8:26 PM   #7
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 6
Default

Great. I thougth I was doing a good thing by getting the Nikon brand lenses.
markesq is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 4, 2008, 11:45 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 324
Default

The cute picture of the businesson the ebay page and the company's website does NOT match the picture of the business address available on Google Maps.

Just thought you might want to know.


StevieDgpt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 5, 2008, 8:49 AM   #9
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

markesq wrote:
Quote:
Great. I thougth I was doing a good thing by getting the Nikon brand lenses.
You can't expect to get Nikon's pro grade lenses paying that little for a camera kit. A single lens could cost you a lot more than you're paying for that entire outfit including lenses. ;-)

Those lenses should be fine for most shooting needs. Chances are, your skill is a photographer is going to be the limiting factor for getting good photos in most conditions, not the lenses or camera you're using.

The entry level kit lenses give you an opportunity to find any limitations with your equipment, without spending a lot of money up front. They're also small and light for their focal range (brighter lenses are larger and heavier). So, you have to take convenience into consideration, as you may not want to lug around a heavier kit.

Then, after you've used a kit like that for a while, you'll be able to make better informed decisions later if you find those lenses are limiting you in some way (and they may not, depending on what you are shooting, and the conditions you're shooting in). There are pros and cons to any lens choice.


JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 7, 2008, 7:30 PM   #10
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 6
Default

Thanks for help.


markesq is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 7:48 PM.