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Old Sep 12, 2008, 8:43 AM   #21
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I see that your on line now, Jandq - so I'll supply the information until Jim takes a swing by. Cannon and Nikon both use lens based image stabilization. This means that you need to buy the more expensive image stabilized lens for each focal range you want. Also, there usually are not any stabilized lens available for some focal ranges - mainly wide angle where it usually is not necessary (probably not a concern for you).

The third party lenses (Sigma, Tokina, Tameron) have not really started to make image stabilized lenses for the most part, so you are limited to the vendor's lenses. For the in-body stabilization, any lens mounted becomes stabilized.

The in-body stabilization (Sony, Pentax and Olympus) is implemented differently than the lens, but provides the same results. It is argued that the lens based is slightly better, however in my experience with my Pentax - I would believe it would be difficult to see any difference in actual practice.

The Sony name is relatively new to photography, however you have to remember that they bought Minolta, so in reputation and experience, I doubt that you have anything to worry about. Minolta was the first to introduce image stabilization, so Sony certainly does have the ability to innovate here.

Hope that helps!
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Old Sep 12, 2008, 10:37 AM   #22
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Some good info but also some red herrings. I don't see anything that says image stabilization would be a requirement for your stated needs. So if you went Canon you DONT need to spend money on IS lenses. Conversely I don't see the in-body IS of Sony as an advantage to what you want to do. Bottom line I wouldn't factor IS into the equation much.

From a body standpoint either the A700 or Canon 40d would be great. Either would fit the bill. The key is to figure out the lens solution for both systems and figure out the total price. Don't compare prices of kits since you know you need lenses beyond the kit. Then assuming both are still in the equation, let ergonomics be the deciding point.
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Old Sep 13, 2008, 10:55 AM   #23
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Hi John, I do not greatly disagree with you, however I believe that there are some stated requirements that would certainly imply a need for IS.

Jandq in a few of his postings indicated....

Quote:
Much of my shooting is in harsh environments not indoors or studio. Many of the shows are outside also. Other examples of shooting situations are on the beach, in the woods, in snow, in all weather conditions from hot to cold. I won't be using a tripod either because I am constantly moving with my dogs as they do.
Quote:
...because the best dog photographs are at the same level as the dog which means I have to get on my knee's in a split second to take many photo's.
Quote:
Two things are very important to me. One is speed of camera because I never know when the perfect shot is going to be there. Coupled with the jerky movements of a dog speed is a concern. Secondly the end product is decent picture quality for my efforts. I might go 4 hours to get that one good picture. Other days not even get one good picture. Not like working with a model where you can explain what your looking for to them.
Quote:
A split second the perfect pose is there and then it's gone. I'm not speaking of a dog stacked at crufts so much, but in that situation even their they are looking around and you might have 3 seconds to fire off several pictures and maybe one might work. Most of my shooting is outside.
Decomposing these, I think one could extract that Jandq is going to be hurried, setup is going to be at a minimum, he is going to be bouncing around, using no tripod, mostly outside with only ambient light - and I will add that I am going to assume probably not able to use the best light. Plus, he wants to burst off as many shots as he can.

So, I think that all of these are ingredients that some type of IS would probably help in increasing the number of good shots. IS is certainly not going to help with the Dog jumping around, but only with the photographers induced shake/vibration. Nor will it fix anything with tracking a moving dog. However, Jandq is looking to get that extra good shot during that 4 hour session, so going from 1 good shot to maybe 2 or 3 within say 500 images, is possibly that extra 1% to increase the overall take.

The other item I was trying to distinguish between was lens based and body based IS and which camera makes supported what, along with the possible implications of one type of IS/camera make as opposed to another.

I'll also agree that IS is not a cure all for everything across the entire focal range. I think that in Jandq's particular situation, IS would usually not be considered (as you have indicated), however when reading between the lines, I think that it would certainly help.


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