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Old Sep 7, 2008, 8:05 PM   #1
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Hi there, I'm struggling to decide what to do about my camera situation!

I'm going backpacking for 4 months, so space is at a premium..but then again, this is a trip of a life time and I want to make sure I can get the best pictures I can.

I'm taking my Yashica SLR as my film camera as I can't bear to not have it with me..especially for slide film that I can cross process.

But with that in mind I'm not sure what to do about my digital camera. I have a Canon 350D and have a 300mm, 105mm macro, 12mm and the standard lens. I really want to take a digital camera but think I'll have problems travelling around with my camera body and lenses..plus I don't want to draw attention to myself, or slow myself down by changing lenses etc.

I was thinking of getting a Lumix DMC 3 as I've always wanted a Leica lens and I loved the idea of the low light conditions I'd be able to shoot in, which is great when you dislike flash as much as I do!But then I realised it had a very limited zoom, so I was introduced to the Power Shot G9, as a Canon user I'm already familiar with the lay outand it has a greater zoom, but the down side is the F stop is 2.8 as opposed to the DMC's 2 and it won't go as wide. I have since read about the P6000, but wasn't shown this when I was in the camera shop so wonder why that might have been.

I love taking portrait shots, but I also love big landscape pictures. I rarely use flash. I like a grainy image with saturated colour. I like a really high contrast in blacks and whites, I mostly shoot in b&w even though I know you shouldn't. I don't ever photo shop my pictures ( don't know how!) so thats why I liek to do as much as I can whilst taking the picture. I like to use manual focus alot, but in travel situations it great to have a quick focus. One of my hates with digital compacts is the time delay from pressing the button to it taking the picture. And I love a blurred background.

Photography hereos are Don McCullen, Mary Ellen Mark and Annie Leibovitz

So thats the kind of photography I'm into!

Is there anyone out there who can help me?!

I'd honestly so appreciate any help you can give. I love taking pictures so much, I'm no where as good as I'd like to be, but I really want to feel like I have the right camera in my hand so at least I have a head start on getting my dream pictures for my once in a lifetime trip.

I'm going to Peru, Fiji, Sydney, Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, Thailand and Bali in case that helps anyone with the kind of pictures and lighting I will have!

Thank you so much for any help or advice. x
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Old Sep 7, 2008, 8:25 PM   #2
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You may want to consider an "all in one" lens solution for the 350D so that you're not swapping lenses (or carrying as many).

Canon just announced a stabilized 18-200mm. But, it may be a while before it shows up on dealer shelves:

Canon 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6 EF-S IS

Tamron has an 18-250mm that you could get now (and I'd go with the 18-250mm since it's got much better optical quality compared to their older 18-200mm). It's not stabilized.

http://www.buydig.com/shop/product.aspx?sku=TM18250EOS

They're coming out with a stabilized 18-270mm. It should start shipping later this month in Japan (and shortly after that in the U.S.). Here's the press release for it:

http://www.tamron.co.jp/en/news/rele...0901_b003.html

You're not going to get the same image quality you'd get using separate lenses to cover the same range. But, if you want a lot of convenience in a single lens solution, you may want to consider them.

Quote:
One of my hates with digital compacts is the time delay from pressing the button to it taking the picture. And I love a blurred background.
You can forget the blurred background using a smaller non-dSLR model (except for small subjects), since you'll have a lot more depth of field for a given subject framing and aperture using one (because their sensors are so tiny, they use a much shorter actual focal length lens for the same angle of view compared to a camera with a larger sensor or film size).

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Old Sep 7, 2008, 8:31 PM   #3
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Here are a couple of reviews for that Tamron 18-250mm. The first one is using a Canon 350D with it:

Tamron 18-250mm review at photozone.de

Here's another review at slrgear.com:

http://www.slrgear.com/reviews/showp...ct/1009/cat/23

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Old Sep 7, 2008, 8:34 PM   #4
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Of course, I'd still get a smaller camera anyway in case something happens to your dSLR (if you decide to take it).

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