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Old Oct 5, 2008, 6:57 PM   #1
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A recent bug bear with my current S7000 is when taking continuous photo's, the viewfinder switches off momenterally between shots.
I found this to be a real pain at a recent drifitng event, where taking shots of the car mid-slide & trying to track them & keep them in the center of the frame while loosing the dispay ever time it takes a shot, made for a memory card full of shots, 90% of which I binned.

I am looking to upgrade to a SLR (a move I may reget having used my dads Pentax DL, & finding it abit of a pain when just wanting to point & shoot) so is there one out there that either does not shut the display off while taking shots, or has a old style straight through glass viewfinder.

On a side note I was looking at a Olympus e-510 if I can't get the above.
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Old Oct 5, 2008, 7:30 PM   #2
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Any camera that has an EVF (electronic view finder ) is going to black out on you , it's a necessity of how the camera works. SLR's also experience, though to a lesser degree depending on the shutter speed, as the mirror flips up out of the path of light to the sensor. there is an old saying about SLR's "if you saw it happen you missed it" Unfortunately optical viewfinders have become a thing of the past on most of the cameras out there. there are some advanced Nikon point & shoots that have them (check their web site ) and I'm sure other brands as well.

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Old Oct 5, 2008, 7:53 PM   #3
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Just to add on - with a DSLR and mirror - the shutter speeds you're dealing with (even if panning you're probably at 1/125) you don't even notice the black-out.

I agree though - it's sad that optical viewfinders on digicams have gone by the wayside - but all DSLRs have them. Some are better than others (i.e. larger / brighter) but IMO optical is much better - especially for action - electronic isn't quite there yet - still not working at the speed of light.
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Old Oct 5, 2008, 11:03 PM   #4
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I wonder how well one of these viewfinders would work on a modern digicam.
Obviously precise framing would be impossible., but it might be a fun experiment.

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Old Oct 6, 2008, 2:52 AM   #5
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You can certainly use external optical viewfinders that mount in the flash hot-shoe (if your camera has one - most of the higher-end P&S cameras have them).

Of course the viewfinders only have framelines for one or two focal lengths, but if they are the focal lengths you use then they work very well.

For example it's quite common to use the 35mm finder with the Canon G9, which has it's widest setting at 35mm, and if you zoom then you use the LCD.

The Sigma DP1 (28mm equivalent) and coming Sigma DP2 (40mm equivalent) also work well with this mechanism.

It is also commonly done with the Ricoh cameras and the coming Panasonic LX3 is also a good candidate for this.

http://www.cosina.co.jp/seihin/voigt...sh/acce-e.html
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Old Oct 6, 2008, 3:53 PM   #6
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right, now I understand that, with a SLR the view finder would fick off as the mirror moves, but on something like my S7000 where the view finder is nothing more than a LCD display, why does it need to do this?
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Old Oct 6, 2008, 7:20 PM   #7
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You must remember that the data that forms the image on your LCD comes from the same censor that creates the final photograph. Essentially that censor must turn its self off to clear the data, then turn itself back on for the exposure, then turn its self off again while it sends that data to the buffer, then turn its self back on again to give you a view on your LCD.

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Old Oct 7, 2008, 1:35 PM   #8
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aaah yeah makes sense.
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