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Old Oct 26, 2008, 6:54 PM   #1
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I own a Nikon D40, great camera .. don't get me wrong really like it. but it's time to move up . I own the 18-200 vr lens also.. awesome lens..

I'm a landscape fanatic and love taking nature shots, just want a better camera for doing landscape.

I'm so torn between the new Nikon D90 and the soon to be released Canon 5DMk II

I have seen some of the shots from the old 5d on landscape and they truly are vivid.

Any advice from some of you would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

Steve




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Old Oct 26, 2008, 9:46 PM   #2
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Like Nikon?

Most likely going to get another Nikon?

Then get a new lens first. Not saying there is anything wrong with your lens, but your existing lens only is 18mm wide (~25mm in 35mm speak).

Grab something that will go wider. I don't keep up with Nikon, but I am sure there is something along the lines of a 10-20 from Nikon or Sigma/Tamron/Tokina that will work on your camera. Get agood quality lens. I bet you will be suddenly happier with your camera shooing landscapes.... and if not then you have a great lens for your new Nikon body.
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Old Oct 27, 2008, 2:37 AM   #3
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Depends on your budget really and how much you are willing to pay for increasingly small returns.

The lens you currently have (although it's the best superzoom around) is not the greatest resolution lens you can get, so it's true that by getting a better wide-angle lens you could significantly improve your images.

But if you are looking for the current likely kings in DSLR landscape photography you should check out the Sony A900 and Canon 5DMkII. Both around $3000 for the body only, and you will probably want to put in something similar for lenses. So if you're not keen on spending $5,000 then look first at a better wide angle lens for your D40, and then by all means upgrade to a D90 body too.
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Old Oct 27, 2008, 10:05 PM   #4
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I had the Nikon 12-24 Lens for a while but did not use it that much and ended up selling it. instead I bouight the 10.5 fisheye and got some vey great shots from that lens.. unusual.

I know i'm in already for a few lens with Nikon..but can always sell them..

Just would like to know.. in anyones opinon go for the new Nikon D90 or wait for the Canon 5DMk II

Most of my shots are landscape and holidays..

Thanks for all the advice from people with experience.

Steve
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Old Oct 27, 2008, 10:52 PM   #5
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Hi Steve,

I agree with StevieDgpt on getting a better wide angle lens and continue to use your current body. I shoot Pentax, and am also an avid wide angle person - myself. I just recently broke down and purchased (after a year of saving my lunch money) a Pentax DA 12-24/f4 which is essentially the same as the Tokina 12-24/f4. However, Tokina has earlier this year - started to deliver a new Tokina 11-16/f2.8 (Nikon and Canon mounts only) that is extremely sharp across the lens (corners to center) with great distortion control. It has received quite a few great reviews - some indicating its better than the Nikon's 12-24 DX.

http://www.kenrockwell.com/tokina/11-16mm.htm
http://www.flickr.com/groups/d200/di...7604872971345/

Its an extension of the current very successful Tokina/Pentax 12-24 design. I was waiting for Pentax to offer it, however it has not shown up - so I gave up and went with the 12-24 (and I really like it). Normally in wide angle, speed is not really an issue. Again, however - I was shooting in the National Air and Space Annex at Dulles, and I can say that 2.8 would have been a lot easier than 4. So yes, most of the time its not important - until a situation appears in which it helps (alot).

I suggest this approach for several reasons - 1) its cheaper than a new body, 2) I would think that it should work across both your current D40 and a new Nikon body [but check this out since I do not shoot Nikon], 3) let the D90 drop in price and make sure the bugs are worked out (of any new body) and 4) if you go for a new body, your still going to have to get a better wide angle lens.

If the 11-16 is out of budget, then I would easily recommend the Tokina 12-24 as a second selection. It's a bit slower, 1mm narrower and a really good lens in and of itself - and it's built like a tank.

The Tokina 11-16 f2.8 is about $570 and up
The Tokina 12-24 f4 is running about $440 and up.

http://www.kenrockwell.com/tech/digi...comparison.htm
http://www.nikonians.org/nikon/nikko...hootout_5.html

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&c...mp;btnG=Search

Also, the front lens is 77mm (on both the 11-16 and 12-24, I believe), a very inviting target for what ever may happen. After a week of looking at it, I went shopping for a filter. I wanted a polarizer and sprang for an ultra thin Nikon. Yes, it was a bit more expensive than a just for plain protection, but I am willing to sacrifice it to protect the front lens. I went ultra thin to prevent any additional vignetting.

Also, here is an interesting article on the 12-24 complementing a 18-200 for travel.

http://ferenc.biz/articles/tokina-12...ns-comparison/

Hope that helps...

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Old Oct 27, 2008, 10:57 PM   #6
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Hi again, I see that we posted at pretty much the same time. For a bit more versatility I would suggest the Tokina 10-17 FE also. I too have the Pentax DA 10-17 FE and the ability to adjust the focal length is great. The 17 end is much more rectilinear than the 10 wide end, and your able to place the bend where you wish pretty much, through framing the shot. Its just a suggestion. Both Pentax and Tokina co-designed this lens also, and quite a few folks over in the Pentax formum like using it also.

Enjoy!
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Old Oct 27, 2008, 11:07 PM   #7
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Hi Steve - one last post, before I start my writing for work tomorrow. On the Pentax forum, one of the better photographers there, was looking to move away from the Pentax K20D, that he has been using (he is into landscapes - and exceptionally good). He settled on the D90, was able to get it at a great discount and had both bodies and lens sets for a while. You can read about his search, selection criteria, his comparison and decision here...

http://forums.steves-digicams.com/fo...mp;forum_id=80

He has a very good analysis on his decision - along with posts and questions and answers. It may be something that your looking for.

... to make a long story short - he kept the K20 and sold the D90.
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Old Oct 28, 2008, 2:48 AM   #8
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Hang on a second chaps. Theschorney said he had the Nikon 12-24 and didn't use it much.

The Nikon 12-24 is unequivocally the best wide angle lens made by any manufacturer at the moment. If that didn't suit him then the others sure won't.

The Nikon D90 is not in the same market segment as the Canon 5DII at all, so it's a little confusing how you have narrowed down your choice to those two cameras.

If you're looking for a really good landscape and travel camera, and you don't mind the weight then the 3 on your shortlist should be: Nikon D700, Sony A900, Canon 5DII.

The only sense in which the D90 and 5DII compete directly is that they are the first two DSLR cameras to do video. When it comes to the video side of things the Canon is way out in front, actually it's way out in front in all respects, but then it does cost three times as much so it's what you would expect.

When choosing a higher-end camera, it's not just the camera you should be thinking about, you need to consider your lens choices too. Do you use the telephoto end of the 18-200 very much? To make a recommendation we really need to know whether you want a big zoom range, or if not, what focal lengths and type of photography you are interested in.


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Old Oct 28, 2008, 3:42 AM   #9
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Yes I do use the tele of the 18 -200 Vr quite a bit and probably want even more zoom for those far off shots that I can not get close too.
I was out this weekend doing some whale watching and the boat could only get to within 150 meters of them.. so did not get very good shots.. but the ones I did I cropped and blew up .. the noise was just too much to be useful. Although trying to take shots from a boat that is rocking in the ocean is fun to say the least..
I regret selling the lens.. probably just did not know how to use it properly.
As for what types of Photography do i like..? people, scenery, landscapes.. structures...Vivid colors
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Old Oct 28, 2008, 7:36 AM   #10
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You really have to be careful. You can't expect a body to make up for using the wrong lens (i.e. your whale watching trip). So don't expect miracles there.

I'm going to de-bunk something. The beauty of full frame isn't so you can crop down a lot because you used a lens that's too short. So if that's your goal in moving 'up' in cameras, you're doomed to disappointment. The beauty is in capturing detail. To an extent that let's you crop more but the reality is if your subject is too far away, even with full frame, you're probably not going to have enough detail to crop down. Remember, the lens is still important. If the subject is too far away for the lens to capture enough light for detail and beyond the lens' ability to properly focus you'll still end up with a poor shot.

So, if you find yourself wanting a new camera because you crop so much I would suggest a MUCH better spend of your $$ is on a longer lens so you don't have to crop so much.

Maybe I missed it but this cropping seems to be the first reason you've indicated why you think a new body is needed.
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