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Old Oct 31, 2008, 8:41 AM   #11
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If you are outside in all kinds of weather, the K200's weather sealing might be an important feature. I've found it very useful quite often (though I had the older K10). Add the in-camera stabilization for shooting inside museums and historic buildings, and the ability to use older Pentax lenses (which are often cheaper than their modern equivalents) and you have a really nice package for travel pictures (I have an old 24mm 2.8 lens, that I bought new in 1980 that I often use - it's nice to have it stabilized for interior shots).

As far as lenses go, it really depends on how you see things - do you normally look for details or for the whole picture? If you find yourself taking pictures of details, then you can always wait to get a really wide angle lens - all of the kit lenses are fairly wide. If you find yourself always wanting to capture the whole area, then definitely think about a really wide angle lens right away. Sigma makes a 10-20 that seems to be well liked and comes in a variety of mounts, and a number of manufacturers have 12-24 lenses.

Until recently the stabilized lenses from Nikon and Canon were mostly longer telephoto lenses - the longer the lens, the more prone to camera shake it will be. It's only been recently that they've started to produce wider angle lenses that are stabilized. Remember that stabilized lenses tend to be more expensive.
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Old Oct 31, 2008, 9:45 AM   #12
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khamael wrote:
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I travel a bit. So, landscapes, buildings, outside stuff for sure.
The lens on your G9zoomsfrom 7.4 to 44.4mm. That's equivalent to 35 to 210mm on a 35mm film camera. The kit lens on any dSLR will zoom wider than that, so you'll get more for landscapes and buildings than you're getting now. "Outside stuff" depends on the focal length; if you don't often go beyond 18mm on your G9, then I think the kit lens will cover that as well. And even if it doesn't, there are good, inexpensive telephoto zoom lenses available forall dSLRs.

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Nice portraits is something is something I don't get a lot with the G9. Special indoors.
By "nice portraits" I presume you mean large aperture, shallow depth of field shots. The kit lens won't do that, but large aperture lenses are available for all dSLRs.

So it comes down to features and capabilities:
  • Image Stabilization - Reduces, if not eliminates motion blur due to camera shake.[/*]
    • Optical - Canon & Nikon (Lenses are bigger, heavier, and more expensive, and the selection is limited.)[/*]
    • Sensor Shift -Most Olympus, and allPentax & Sony (Works with all lenses, even 20 year old used lenses.)(Though, while the selection of used lenses is quite good for Pentax and Sony, there aren't a lotof used lenses for Olympus)
    [/*]
  • 'Live View' - allows you to compose photos using the LCD display as well as the optical Viewfinder. (Choices within your budget are limited.)[/*]
    • Canon 450D (12MP)& 1000D (10MP)[/*]
    • (Nothing from Nikon within your budget.)[/*]
    • Olympus E-420 (no image stabilization) & E-520[/*]
    • (Nothing from Pentax within your budget.)[/*]
    • Sony A300 (10MP) and A350 (14MP) (The A350 may be outside your budget.)
    [/*]
  • High ISO performance[/*]
    • Canon is best, followed closely by[/*]
    • Nikon.[/*]
    • Sony and Pentax are about even[/*]
    • Olympus is worst.
[/*]
It's hard for me to estimate what you can get within your budget since I can't find any on-line retailers that are in English and show prices in Euros, so I'm guessing about how a particular camera will affect your budget.

Another important consideration is how the camera feels to you. If you can't hold the camera comfortably, if you can't quickly locate the commands and controls, you're going to miss some shots. Have you tried any of these cameras?
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Old Nov 1, 2008, 6:24 AM   #13
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Valuable information guys, thanks!

Shouldn't the nikon 60d, penta k200d be within the budget? Compared to the 450d for example? Or they are not good acoording to you?
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Old Nov 1, 2008, 7:15 AM   #14
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khamael wrote:
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Shouldn't the nikon 60d, penta k200d be within the budget?
Yes. I was just identifying some of the major features and capabilities that distinguish one brand from another. It was supposed to be a first step in helping you pick a camera. Once you decide what you're looking for, then we can discuss individual camera models. If you're interested in 'Live View', for instance, there's no reason to consider either the Nikon D60 or the Pentac K200D.
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Old Nov 1, 2008, 9:17 AM   #15
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Is live view such an important feature?
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Old Nov 1, 2008, 9:21 AM   #16
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khamael wrote:
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Is live view such an important feature?
The biggest advantage to live view in a DSLR is for macro work and some portrait work. For everyday shooting it's not important. My camera has the feature and in the 17 months I've owned it I've never even tried it to see if it works.

I'm not a big fan of using it without a tripod because it's not a stable shooting stance - it's one thing to hold a digicam that's a few ounces like that but not a DSLR. But for photography where you have plenty of time and want critically sharp focus (like some macro or some portrait) it can be very beneficial.
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Old Nov 1, 2008, 9:38 AM   #17
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I had an old Fuji Finepix S602 with live view and it had pro's and cons:

PROS
I liked the fact I could see all the lots of exposure info at the bottom and all around the edges of the viewfinder. You could even magnify the image!

You could see the result of manual exposure, it would lighten or darken the image in the viewfinder.

You "see" what the camera sees.


WEAKNESSES
Depending on the pixel count displayed in the viewfinder, the LCD view can be a little "weird" to the eye in comparison to a prism view. It takes a little time to get used to - and in the case of the S602 which was "low" resolution - you had to trick your eye into accepting the low resolution image was good enough for composition.

For me, personally, I think and electronic shutter of my S602 (versus mechanical) is more of a selling feature than live view. Very quiet and precise. I could take photos in a church without bothering anyone. With my Canon 20D, the shutter packs a wallop. Electronic shutter is a nice "stealth mode".

-- Terry
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Old Nov 1, 2008, 12:13 PM   #18
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khamael wrote:
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Is live view such an important feature?
No. Not for the types of photos you say you want to take.

So, that excludes 'Live View'.

How do you feel about image stabilization?

And have you had a chance to try any of these cameras?
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Old Nov 1, 2008, 11:35 PM   #19
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I'm another who thinks that live view isn't terribly useful. It will be really useful for some people, but the one time I really did want to use it (my dSLR has it), it was outside, I was resting the camera on the side mirror of a 4x4 because I couldn't exactly get out of the vehicle at that place. The sunlight washed out the image on the LCD - the image was only good enough to frame the picture, I let the camera focus where it wanted to.

Image stabilization is a personal thing - I happen to find it very useful, as I'm not the steadiest person as I used to be. Others, especially if they are normally using a tripod, won't particularly care.
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Old Nov 10, 2008, 4:17 PM   #20
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OK dear people!

I've bought a Nikon D60, played for 2 days, and I went back and change for the Canon EOS 450d!

Why? I didn't like the only 3 focus points (not used to that). Other annoying thing is the way the camera tries to grab the focus. It "bounces" very often...
I'm very happy with the 450d. Even the first trial photos, I felt it much better. Better colors, etc. BTW, the live view came in handy.
So, next thing, after playing more and more, I'll buy some lenses, what I see fits best. I'll take your suggestions up in consideration.

Thanks!
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