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Old Oct 30, 2008, 1:50 PM   #1
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Hi guys!

As another photo enthusiast, wanting to buy a new camera, moving up from my G9. I need a bit of help with all these DSLR!!
Which one you think is better?
1) nikon d80
2) nikon d60
3) canon eos 30d
4) pentax k200d

Thanks!
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Old Oct 30, 2008, 1:55 PM   #2
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The 30D would probably be the best body for most conditions between those choices, with a faster frame rate, higher usable ISO speeds, more lens choices, better than average build quality, etc. It's an out of production model now (replaced by the newer 40D and 50D models).

Your subject type and the conditions you want to shoot in will have an impact on what's a better choice for you, as well as the lenses you buy for a camera.

What do you want to shoot? What's your budget for camera and lenses?

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Old Oct 30, 2008, 2:34 PM   #3
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The 40d would be a bit higher price (special with some starting lenses), that's why I'm interested in the 30d.

Something like http://tweakers.net/pricewatch/19890...-zoom-kit.html I'm thinking to spend around 600eur if the camera justifies. Otherwise I'll try to keep in 400eur.

Well, I travel once in a while, so outside, landscapes kinda of thing will pop often. And I wanna take portraits also. Well.. general use I guess
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Old Oct 30, 2008, 3:01 PM   #4
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If I were looking at those choices, I'd get the 30D. It's going to be more versatile in more conditions compared to the other choices, especially in low light, since it's more sensitive than rated at higher ISO speed settings.

As for lenses, any choice is a compromise (size, weight, zoom range from wide to long, apertures available, sharpness/contrast/color at various focal lengths and apertures, flare resistance, build quality, ergonomics, cost and more).

To start with, I'd probably stick to a fairly basic zoom lens (for example, a Sigma 17-70mm f/2.8-4.5 AF lens) and perhaps one bright prime (for example, a Canon 50mm f/1.8 AF lens).

I'd use that kit for a while before spending any money on different lenses. Then after you get some experience shooting with that equipment, you'll be able to make better informed decisions on any equipment you may need to improve, if your lenses versus your skill level are holding you back in some way.

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Old Oct 30, 2008, 4:07 PM   #5
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Another option might be the Canon XSi.

This is just my opinion, but at this point of the game if I were getting my first DSLR, unless I was making money from my photography or I had deep pockets and price was not as much of a concern, I think it's hard to justify buying a semi-pro cam when the Rebel XSi, which I would term a "high end serious amateur" camera is probably suffice for 99 percent of all amateurs.

Any cam you buy is going to be somewhat outmoded within 4 years or so. For instance, I paid $1,400 for the Canon 20D (body only) four years ago, and now the later models are better and cheaper.

Having said that, I would be the last person to stand in the way of anyone wishing to spend even more on their hobby - we only live once!

However, saving a little on the camera body might free up a little more cash for an extra lens like a Canon 80mm F1.8 prime, which would be a juicy addition to anyone's arsenal.

I'd recommend you look at a wide angle lens as your primary lens, either the kit, or the Sigma 17-70 or whatever else catches your fancy, as long as it's a
17 mm or less on the wide end.

There you have it - my analytical mind working overtime!
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Old Oct 31, 2008, 6:45 AM   #6
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How about the image stabilization?

Canon eos 30d doesn't have it, so have to buy lenses with it (how much more?)
Nikon d60 has in the camera.

Concerning this??
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Old Oct 31, 2008, 7:51 AM   #7
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The only model in your list that has stabilization built into the camera body is the Pentax K200D.

A number of Sony, Olympus and Pentax dSLR models have stabilization built into the camera body (so that any lens you use benefits from it).

With Canon and Nikon, you'll need stabilized lenses if you want that feature (Nikon VR lenses or Canon IS lenses).


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Old Oct 31, 2008, 7:55 AM   #8
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Image stabilization is a good idea. There are two ways of doing it. Canon and Nikon do it in the lens, which makes stabilization available for their film cameras as well. Pentax, Olympus, and Sony do it in the camera body, which makes it available for any lens. While Canon and Nikon have the best selection of OEM and third party lenses, Pentax and Sony have the best selection of stabilized lenses because all lenses, including lenses made over 20 years ago, are stabilized.

You started this topic with a selection of dSLRs. My preference is to approach the question "What dSLR should I buy?" by finding lenses that are appropriate for the types of subject(s), and then selectingan appropriate dSLR that the lens(es) will fit, while keeping everything within a budgetted amount.

You didn't mention what kinds of photos you want to take, or how much you've got to spend. If you provide that info, we may recommend something you hadn't even considered.

So:
  • What types of photos do you like to take? [/*]
  • How much do you have to spend?[/*]
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Old Oct 31, 2008, 8:09 AM   #9
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money wise, i'd say 500-600 eur with lenses, would be nice.

Now, what photos to take... tricky question
I travel a bit. So, landscapes, buildings, outside stuff for sure.
Nice portraits is something is something I don't get a lot with the G9. Special indoors.
Satisfactory answer?


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Old Oct 31, 2008, 8:10 AM   #10
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TCAV makes a good point. First figure out what kind of photography you want to do, then figure out which lenses you prefer, then buy the camera body.

The only problem with that approach is:
- sometimes the type of photography we do changes over time
- difficult to really understand how a lens will perform for you without being able to try it.
- hard to gauge the usability of a camera body without trying it.

In a perfect world we'd take home and couple of different lenses and camera bodies, try them out for the weekend and see what we like and then buy one of them (yah, right!).

The other argument goes that your buying into a "system". For instance, if you buy a Canon body and make an investment in a few Canon lenses, you'll likely want to stay with Canon in the future. Same argument for Nikon, Pentax, etc.

It used to be that quality Canon lenses were less expensive than the others. Once in a while I see an Olympus deal where they throw in a couple of really, nice juicy Olympus lenses and body at a price that's hard to ignore.

For instance, if I was on a "budget", it's pretty hard to ignore this deal on an Oympus 510 with two lenses for $589. In my mind, they're practically throwing in the body for nothing:

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...specifications


So it all comes down to analysis and choices and a little blind faith. I'd still steer you to the Canon XSi. You've bought Canon before (G9), and perhaps I'm urging you not to overbuy unless you really NEED it.

LENSES
- for landscape and buildings I would recommend a telephoto with 10-20mm on the wide end, with as little barrel distortion as possible and lots of edge sharpness.

- for portraits you could go with a nice quality zoom, F2.8 max aperture on the wide end, or you could go for a Canon 50mm prime. Their F/1.8 50mm prime is only $90 is a steal. Or you could go for the 50mm F1/4 in the $300 range, or even better the 80mm F/1.8 prime for around $369 which is a killer portrait lens.

- Check out the Sigma 10-20 zoom. I have it and it's a killer lens for close in people and group shots, as well as landscape and buildings. Very highly rated by anyone that uses it.

So if I was the "salesman" I'd steer you to the Rebel XSi and the kit lens. After you play around with the cam for a while, you could see if your priority is to get a wider angle lens like the Sigma 10-20, or a prime like the 50mm F/1.8 or a longer zoom. Then you could spend a little more time studying lenses (and prolong your gratification a little).

Check out Steve's review conclusions for the XSi (and sample photos). If that doesn't get you "chompering" for this cam I don't know what will!

http://www.steves-digicams.com/2008_...l_xsi_pg7.html




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