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Old Nov 9, 2008, 5:49 PM   #1
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I like the fact that the image stabilization in the Pentax is in the camera and not in the lens, I also like the fact that almost all Pentax lens will fit this model which provides a little more flexbility. Haven't seen much mentioned on this website about this model.

The Canon Rebel XS and XSi certainly have a great reputation and the reviews I've read have good things to say.

The idea is to have a camera that will take good pictures, has some flexibility, is easy to use and has some adaptability.

Your thoughts appreciated.


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Old Nov 9, 2008, 7:16 PM   #2
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Rogerstj wrote:
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The idea is to have a camera that will take good pictures, has some flexibility, is easy to use and has some adaptability.

Your thoughts appreciated.

Any of the DSLRs on the market will fit this criteria. It's pretty strait forward. The one suggestion is to go to a store and handle the various cameras - the ergonomics of each is different. If the pentax feels good to you, there's no good reason not to get it - it's a great camera.
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Old Nov 9, 2008, 7:39 PM   #3
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There's a quite a few Pentaxians here - take a look further down to the dSLR section and check out the Pentax dSLR section. You'll find some really knowledgeable people who are happy to answer all your questions and share their experiences.

Either the Canon or the Pentax are capable cameras, they have very different ergonomics though. As JohnG pointed out, it's really important to handle the cameras. Some people will immediately prefer one over the other. The best camera in the world can't take good pictures if its in your closet because you find it too small/large/heavy/light etc.
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Old Nov 9, 2008, 8:18 PM   #4
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In addition to feel, there are good reasons for selecting one dSLR over another. What types of photos do you want to take? Wildlife? Outdoor sports? Indoor sports? Landscapes? Cityscapes? Portraits? Events? Macrophotography?
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Old Nov 10, 2008, 2:02 PM   #5
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Great suggestion about the feel, hadn't thought about that.
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Old Nov 10, 2008, 2:04 PM   #6
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Thanks for the suggestion and have found a lot more reviews on the Pentax cameras and they have been very informative, getting closer to making a final decision, of course once I have the feel of them.
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Old Nov 10, 2008, 2:08 PM   #7
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The photos I normally tend to take are those when on holidays, a lot of landscapes, cityscapes, some macros and closeups and wildlife as available. I'm moving up from a point and shoot primarily because of the better zoom capability of these cameras, and I plan on acquiring a zoom lens at some point in the future once I've decided on the feel of the camera I like.
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Old Nov 10, 2008, 4:37 PM   #8
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Rogerstj wrote:
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I'm moving up from a point and shoot primarily because of the better zoom capability of these cameras,
Out of curiosity, zoom for what purpose? Superzoom DSLRs have 400mm+ equivelant lenses (think 300mm lens on a DSLR). When you start talking about more reach than that, the lenses start getting VERY pricey if you want decent quality (as in think $1000 plus). Again, just setting expectations. How much you spend depends on what you want to do with the lens.
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Old Nov 10, 2008, 5:23 PM   #9
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Budget always has to be a factor.

For instance, a Panasonic FZ28 has a 28-300 zoom lens of pretty good quality, and costs less than $300.

A typical DSLR long zoom lens can cost $300 and upwards.

So basically, when you buy a superzoom camera your paying for the lens and practically getting the rest of the camera for free!

A good entry level DSLR is going to cost $500 and up for the body alone , and then decent lenses cost $300 and up.

So, if your budget restrained, a superzoom is a great deal. If your looking for maximum image quality and flexibility (the ability to choose your lenses) then a DSLR is a good purchase.
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Old Nov 10, 2008, 5:43 PM   #10
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Actually, the FZ28 (and Olympus SP-560 and FZ18and Fuji S8100fdhave zoom ranges from 27mm to 486mm. I have a Pentax K200d and bought a decent 55-300 mm lens for it. That lens, which is actually pretty inexpensive compared with some of the other high quality zoom lenses, cost me about $330. The camera cost $580 (after rebate). The FZ28,which I got last week, was $296. Also, the FZ28 is about half the size of the K200d with the 55-300mm lens.



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