Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > What Camera Should I Buy?

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Nov 28, 2008, 5:25 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 6
Default

Canon SX10IS
Sony DSC-H50
Panasonic DMC-FZ28
Nikon Coolpix P80

Please someone help me to compare these models. i think i've read too much reviews and now it's a complete mess in my head.

I need to choose one really fast to get it as a birthday present :roll:

i'm just afraid to choose wrong camera as i did with Ixus50 some years ago (bad photos in low light environment, no image stabilization when hands are shaking)...

Just looking for a small camera with good zoom, high quality pictures outdoor and indoor and with shaking hangs :G, fast shooting.

please help me to compare these models (or maybe you can advice some other models too)

Best regards
hogl is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Nov 28, 2008, 5:45 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 617
Default

Here's how I'd rate them:

1. Panasonic FZ28 - very good all around
2. Sony H50 - excellent image quality
3. Canon SX10 - packed with features, good picture quality but heavy, some issues with dynamic range, some chromatic aberration
4. Nikon P80 - good all around.
AndyfromVA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 29, 2008, 3:37 AM   #3
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 6
Default

Thanks for the reply.

But i'm still confused


hogl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 29, 2008, 9:23 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 1,870
Default

Well hogl,

I'm a bit confused as to what you're looking for. Perhaps if you better explain your goals and needs, we can eliminate your confusion.

You say you need to choose really fast, because you want to get it as a birthday present. For who - you? Someone else? Why did you wait until the last minute? Is the intended photographer experienced in digital photography? What kind of photography is the recipient most interested in? Good quality indoor and outdoor doesn't tell us much. Portraits, landscapes, wildlife, sports, concerts...what?

The only thing we know right now is, you want a small camera with good zoom. How small - ultracompact...compact? What is small? A small P&S or a small DSLR? Define good zoom...36-105mm...28-140mm...18-600mm? What is good zoom? What is fast shooting? As fast as you can pull the trigger? Fully automatic? A 7-barrel minigun?

You apparently had a bad experience with low light photography and you (or the intended recipient) has shaky hands. So we want a good low light camera with IS - right?

Get back to us with some more details, and maybe we can help you out before the birthday.

the Hun



rinniethehun is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 29, 2008, 4:44 PM   #5
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 6
Default

Sorry.
I'm almost a complete noob in digital photography, and English isn't my strong point especially when it goes into terms and technical words (sadly it's my 3rd language) :?
It's for me. i just didn't know that relatives would go for a camera as a present - now i'm a bit in a hurry with choosing the right one.
Am i experienced? not very as i had only ixus 50 so far and have noone who could help me with learning something about taking digital pictures. I've read a lot but it's not enough.
Most interested in taking pictures of my child indoors and outdoor, take camera with me on vacation which makes it for portraits, landscapes. need it to be capable of taking good pictures while moving (walking or driving at the same time). Also take a lot of pictures inside the buildings in low light. i doubt that i will use some additional Flash unit though.
Size? Like Sony DSC-H50. I think all others i named are approx the same size here.
Regarding zoom - starting from x15 (i wish i could better immagime the difference here - does anyone have same photo with x15 and x20 at leats, so i could see for real how futher it will shoot).
How fast? fast enough to take first picture of a child before he turns his head away from me :roll: and i would like to be able to take multiple pictures of moving objects.
regarding low light - my cam made terrible pictures in low light if not using a tripod for it - if my hand shaked a bit (which always happen). Same was in good light when zooming to maximum optical zoom.

I'm very sorry. i'm not that good at all it so you could easily help me out.

the more i read reviews of these models the more i find cons for each camera, espessially in dynamic range, chromatic aberration, barrol distorsions or something like that (i wish i knew all that fings and their meanings)...


hogl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 30, 2008, 7:48 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 1,870
Default

hogl,

Now I have a better idea. Don't worry about your English - it's a lot better than some people who use it as their first and only language.

Regarding zoom, disregard the 'x' factor..it's only a relative term which has no meaning as what your picture will look like. For example, a camera with a zoom focal length of 36 to 180mm has a zoom factor of 5x. A camera with a focal length of 28 to 140mm also has a zoom factor of 5x. Go to this site and see the difference of the same scene at different focal lengths:

http://www.tamron.de/Focal_Length_Co....html?&L=2

Now, if you will be taking pics of children inside, a focal length of 28mm (wide angle) is desirable. If you intend to take pictures of wildlife outside, a longer focal length, say 400mm or more is preferred. If you buy a camera that has a focal length of 28 to 400mm, you have a zoom range of roughly 14.3. If you think, therefore that a lens with a zoom range of 20x is better than one of 10x, stop - it ain't necessarily so. The longer the range, the more prone to defects in the lens. It costs a lot of money to design and build a high zoom lens...a $200 18x zoom is liable to fall quite short of your expectations.

Regarding low light pictures, some brands/models are better than others. If you want to see what the cameras on your list can do, go here:

http://www.imaging-resource.com/IMCOMP/COMPS01.HTM

Plug in two of the cameras on your list and compare the "still-life" images at ISO 800 (that's a speed setting you'll probably need to use in low light situatioins). How do they look? Is that what you were hoping to see? Compare each of the cameras on your list this way. Once you have your favorite selected, plug in the Fuji S100fs and compare. What do you think?

Regarding the ability to capture an image of a child before he turns his head, that can be difficult with a point & shoot camera. If you select one with a short lag time, and you pre-focus your shots, you stand a chance. As far as continuous shooting, or burst modes, all of the cams you selected will do that, but some arer better than others.

If you plan on taking a lot of indoor pics, you might want to consider a camera with a hot shoe, so that you can add an external flash.

Hope that helped somewhat.

the Hun

rinniethehun is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 1, 2008, 4:34 AM   #7
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 6
Default

Thank you very much. (and thanks for the compliment on my English)

I learned lot of new stuff there.


Wish i could test them before buying, but that's not possible here. They hardly give you a cam to hold it in your hands, very rare shop lets you at least to turn it on... :sad:


but still can't make up my mind

Canon is a little to big and heavy, but got better menu for me as i always used canon before.
One of the models had ugly and uncomfortable menu, but can't remember which one...



Which is the easiest for beginners?
hogl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 1, 2008, 8:45 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
mtclimber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Oregon, USA
Posts: 18,143
Default

hogl-

Just an opinion, but I sincerely do not believe that the Canon SX10IS is the best choice for your proposed use. The aperture narrows very rapidly as youzoom out make it a rather imperfect choice as a low light level camera.

I happen to own and use thePanasonic FZ-28, the Sony H-50, and the Nikon P-80. Clearly, the Panasonic FZ-28 is the low light winner, and it is very quick and accurate to focus quickly and perfectly when you you the spot focus mode. The Sony H-50 comes in next, but its photos tend to be a little soft in their focus, when compared to the FZ-28. The Nikon P-80 comes in dead last and while it tends to focus well, there is a great deat of electronic noise, and artefact in their low light level photos.

I do a lot of no flash/low light level/existing light stage photgraphy. Here is a sample FZ-28 photo than nice shows it low light level capabilities.

Sarah Joyce
Attached Images
 
mtclimber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 2, 2008, 4:30 AM   #9
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 6
Default

Thank you very much.
I don't want that canon myself anymore. Beside the problems you've described it's a bit too big and heavy :sad:

So for indoor and low light FZ-28 is the best choise.

But what about shooting outside in sun light and shooting moving objects? could you please describe that also as you have all of those cameras and had a chance to test them all.
I'm sorry for taking your time, but for me it's a very expensive thing, and i don't want to get disappointed again as i did with my previous camera.
I've read a lot of reviews but it's always better to hear opinion from someone who has those products and can compare them better as he (or she) uses them constantly.


Thank you all very much for your help.
hogl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 2, 2008, 9:14 AM   #10
Senior Member
 
mtclimber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Oregon, USA
Posts: 18,143
Default

hogl-

The suggested Panasonic FZ-28 is an excellent all around camera in a very small package. It handles all light conditions nicely with a Leica lens and it is well priced.

A lot of folks complain that most cameras have a limited flash range. Here is a photo taken with the FZ-28 at 30 feet. I dded a slave flave that I bought for $5 at a swap meet and now can tke photos up to 45 feet away.

In the final analysis, it is all up to you. You know your needs best.

Sarah Joyce
Attached Images
 
mtclimber is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:39 AM.