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Old Jan 2, 2009, 3:46 PM   #1
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I have decided to go with the digital flow and (pretty much) give up film.

I liked my film set up: Nikon N6006 with Nikkor lenses 24mm, 50mm, and 70-210mm.

Can I keep using these lenses with a DSLR (I assume a Nikon one)? Are there any drawbacks to using these old lenses with a digital body?

Any recommendations for bodies?

Thanks,

JW
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Old Jan 2, 2009, 4:09 PM   #2
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Here's a Nikon.digital lens compatibility chart:

http://www.nikonians.org/html/resour...atibility.html

Depending on the "crop factor" of the digital body you purchase, your 24mm may work like a 40mm lens on your digital. A 50mm becomes a 90mm etc. etc. (assuming a 1.6 crop factor).

Lenses made specifically for digital cameras tend to be smaller and lighter than their film brethren.

In terms of body recommendations, it depends on your budget.

For instance, a Nikon D300 is a highly recommended camera, however the body retails at $1,400-1,500 USD online.

-- Terry
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Old Jan 2, 2009, 4:19 PM   #3
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Hi and welcome to Steve's!

I'm not a Nikon expert so not sure about the lenses, I did a quick search to see if I could confirm if it is the right mount but still can't tell so I'm sure one of the Nikon guys can jump in.

If you are going for anything less than the high end cameras in the Nikon lineup then you have a sensor that is smaller than that of 35mm by a factor of 1.5. This means that the field of view is reduced making every lens appear longer.

24mm will have the same field of view as a 36mm lens, 50mm a 75mm lens and the 70-210 a 105-315mm when on a 35mm body.

Now as for bodies, what will you want to be shooting, if you are looking for day to day use then most of the lineup will do the trick. Assuming we are staying Nikon then then D40 and D60 can be limited on some of the lenses that will work as there is not a focus motor in the body. Personally I would start with the D80 or D90.

If the lenses are not going to be compatible then this opens up a whole world of camera to check out but I won't go into those until I know of what you are looking for and how much you are looking to spend.

Hope that gets you started in the right direction.

Mark
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Old Jan 2, 2009, 5:20 PM   #4
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If you can swing it, go for a D700, all your old lenses will work just fine.

Get yourself a copy of Adobe Lightroom, and the D700 and all will be well in the world.
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Old Jan 2, 2009, 5:21 PM   #5
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Can you please not say D700 in public you will make me start drooling!!!!
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Old Jan 2, 2009, 5:23 PM   #6
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The D3 and D700 are full frame cameras and will not change the angle of view on your lenses. All other models have a 1.5 crop factor

All auto-focus lenses will meter on all digital Nikon cameras but only the AF-S lenses will autofucus on a D-40, D40X and D-60 so your older lenses will need to be manually focused with these cameras


Some things you should know if your going to use manual focus lenses

The D3, D700, D300, D200 will meter with Ai lenses but some info must be input into the camera first.

with all other cameras you will lose all metering function in the camera You will be able to shoot in the manual setting . But will get no reading from the meter. This really is not that big of deal. Just take a test shot and study it as well as the histogram.

If lens is real old ( made prior to 1978 ) it can damage your camera ( this applies to all digital Nikons ). These lenses can be modified to work and many have but you must be careful about this as many of these modifications were not done complete.

Lenses marked Ai or Ai-S are OK to use, Lenses marked Ai-P (do not confuse this with Nikkor-P) will even meter but they are harder to find and usually more expensive.
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Old Jan 2, 2009, 5:26 PM   #7
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I should have added that the high end cameras are the D700 and D3 as mentioned, how slack of me LOL.
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Old Jan 2, 2009, 8:54 PM   #8
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Thank you all for your helpful and timely replies!

I now have a better understanding of what switching to a DSLR entails.

Cheers,

JW
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