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Old Jan 2, 2009, 9:08 PM   #1
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Folks,

All too often we find folks on this great Forum who are looking for a cost effective, family friendly, simple camera. Does that sound impossible to you? Are you looking for a very good camera for around $(US) 200.00 that really can deliver the goods?

Well, I am going to start a new thread built around a pretty average camera: The Sony H-10. Perhaps some are asking, why the Sony H-10 of all cameras. Well it is very affordable, it has a great flash range (up to 23 feet), and it take darned good photos.

So here is what I am proposing. For the next 10 days ( I apologize, as a professional digital camera instructor, I have to complete my commitments. (My husband and I will leave on another contract to teach digital cameras on 12 January) However, in the meantime let take good look at this "little ugly duckling" the Sony H-10.

It really is a darned good digital camera fully capable of great family photos. So if nothing else, just enjoy the Sony H-10 photos, that alone will be be fun.

Here is today's Sony H-10 photo sample. Tell us what you think? It was taken during a summertime visit to Washington DC. Its a typical family photo.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Jan 3, 2009, 1:39 PM   #2
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Here is another photo sample from the Sony H-3. The H-3 and the H-10 are exactly the same except that the H-10 has a slightly bigger LCD screen.

I was able to take this photo from about 15 to 16 feet away usinga portion of the10X optical zoom of the H-3/10 camera. In doing that I did not impose on the conversation with the grandchildren and my husband. The result was a good family photo, with nobody having to assume a pose, intead it was natural, capturing the ambience of the moment.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Jan 4, 2009, 10:50 AM   #3
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The photo for today show why flash range is so very important. What is flash range? It is the distance that the cameras can project sufficient flight from its built-in flash unit toenable the camera to take an acceptable photo.

If you are in a crowd sometimes and rather distant from your subject can you see get a good photo, if I am using flash? It all depends on the camera's flash range. Yes, many times your camera will be able to focus on a distant object or person, but that does not mean that the camera's built in flash unit can project sufficient light to that distance or range.

That is a key element of the Sony H-10. It has a flash range of up to 23 feet. That means that you can still stand back up to 23 feet and get a good photo. If you are in a crowd and have to stand way back, or perhaps your taking photos at the school play, you are going to ned that extra flash range that the Sony H-10 wil give you!

Most point and shoot cameras only have an effective flash range of just 8 to 14 feet. That is the maximum distance to which the camera's built in flash can project enough light to take a photo. Take a look at this photo. When I took the photo I was in a crowd 20 feet from the subject. However, I was able to use the H-10's 10X optical zoom and to zoom in on the Captain quite nicely, and I knew that I would have sufficient light from the H-10's built-in flash unit to get a good photo.

I have attempted to create a bit of photo learning with each sample photo in this thread. Have a good day and I will see you tomorrow.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Jan 5, 2009, 11:10 AM   #4
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Today let's take a look at combining some noticable back lighting and some overhead lightingwith your flash. The effect can be very nice. When you see noticable backlighting, that means light coming from the back of your photo toward the camera, you should remember one simple rule: Backlighting always requires a flash to light up the front of the photo.

We had both overhead lightingand a bit of backlighting. So we used the flash compensation feature of the H-10 and reduced the flash outputand then increased the ISO to 400to use all three light sources. As a result we got a nice photo. You ought to try it sometime.

Have a great day!

Sarah Joyce
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Old Jan 5, 2009, 7:43 PM   #5
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Well, for 06 January 2009 we have a classic outdoor photo with excellent photo quality, excellent dynamic range and , that classic sharpness that is hard to obtain in ultra compact cameras.

Yes, the Sony H-10 is a bit bigger, but still very pocket-able, that what give you the easy operation, better zoom, and sharper photos. Take a good look at this photo's background. There are wonderfully blue skies with nice fluffy white clouds. You can just about feel the wind flowing through your hair.

The Sony H-10 is still in your price range and it is capable of excellent image quality, while providing 10X optical zoom, and up to 23 feet of flash range. All of those features areREAL pluses. So, by moving just a small bit up the camera food chain you get a better camera/product and better photo quality. That is hard to beat!

Sarah Joyce


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Old Jan 6, 2009, 4:52 PM   #6
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Well for 07 January it is a Macro or close-up photo.

The main things that are different with a close-up photo ( a photo where the subject is 30 inches or less from the camera's lens) is that (1) you must switch your camera into the Macro or close-up mode, its the little tulip symbol. (2) You must use the camera's LCD to frame your photo, because if you do have an optical viewfinder, it will not be accurate due to a phenonmena call parrallax.

The was taken on a family trip to Hawaii earlier in the year.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Jan 7, 2009, 6:03 PM   #7
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Well for 08 January we have a nice sunset shot, also from Hawaii. Like a lot of point and shoot cameras today, the Sony H-10 has a very handy and convenient sunset mode. You just switch over to the sunset scene mode and the H-10 automatically mkes all the necessary adjustments to the camera. Now that is pretty easy, isn't it?

Sarah Joyce
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Old Jan 8, 2009, 12:28 PM   #8
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Here is our posting for 09 January 2009. This will be the last posting in this thread for this reason: As a digital camera instructor I have to leave on 09 January on a 6 month long contract. So I will not be posting much at all in the Forum after 09 January, as I will not have an internet connection at a reasonable cost until my husband and I return in mid June 2009.

Today, we have another macro or close-up shot of a Hawaiian fern. What is nice is that the Sony H-10 focuses sharply enough to see all of the fine texture in the fern leaves.

Nobody ever posted to this thread other than myself. However this thread has had a good number of views, which shows, I sincerely believe, that folks are interested in a family camera that provides excellent photos at a reasonable cost.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Jan 8, 2009, 2:24 PM   #9
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Because there has been a lot of interest lately in cameras that not only take excellent outdoor photos, but are also able to take good low light level photos. This photo was taken in the Central Railroad Station in Lisbon, Portugal.

The photo was taken at a manually set ISO of 1600. Not only did the H-10 take a fairly good photo but it produced a fast enough shutter speed to stop the rapid physical action of the passenger moving quickly on the train platform to catch their train.

One last tip that might save you some money. The Sony H-3 and H-10 cameras are photographically the very same camera. The only difference between those two cameras is that the H-10 has a slightly larger LCD screen.

This will be the last posting to this thread, I hope all that have viewed this thread but made no posts have enjoy the thread and the message I have been attempting to convey.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Jan 8, 2009, 2:44 PM   #10
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Sarah,

I realized I haven't posted to your thread as of yet but I was amongst several who probably viewed your thread several times. You have proven to be very knowledgeable about many different camera brands and have definitely given a great argument that the Sony H-10 is a wonderful camera for a wide variety of different scenerios.

One of the main reason I wanted to get a new camera in the first place is because we're having our first baby in a month and I want to get a lot of great, clean images of him/her!

The fern image alone sells the quality of this camera. And that's all handheld?

At first I was a little cautioned on the last photo, in the train station, as I saw graininess in the corners. But then after realizing that the iso was set to 1600 on it, it tells how dark it was in the station to begin with. I couldn't imagine how horrid this shot might look on some of the ultracompacts I was looking for.

Have a good trip and come back and blog some more. Your pictures were very helpful in determining the type of cameras inexperienced people might want to pick up.
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