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Old Jan 10, 2009, 2:46 PM   #1
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Back in 2003 I bought my first digital camera, a used Canon Pro-90IS for $250, it was all I could afford at the time. While it's been quite usable, almost from the day I got it, I knew I wanted something better, and I've come back here probably a dozen times since looking, and never been able to make up my mind on the "perfect" camera, and those that came close where always beyond my finatial reach. A recent discussion with an amature astro-photograpy buddy got me to thinking, There are a variety of sub-disciplines in amature astronomy wich have very different equipment requirements, so most of us end up with a small assortment of very different telescopes that compliment eachother by doing a couple of different things well. Together they do different things better than any one scope could ever possibly do everything, even if a mear mortal could afford it! The same is true of the shooting sports, most of us end up with a rifle, a shotgun, and a handgun. Each is better than the others at a particular aplication, and they compliment eachother.



I was thinking perhapse thismight bethebest approach to selecting camera's as well. Make a list of what you want to do with a camera, and choose two or three reasonably priced cameras that will each excell at a couple very different tasks on your list. For example my list would include.....

1) Taking Astro-images like nebula's, galaxies, star clusters, planets, even the ever changing surface of the Sun!

2) Taking pictures ofguns, telescopes, and other "Stuff" to post on the web in for-sale or want adds.

3) Nature photography, an unusualflower, a turtle in the water, or a crane taking flight.

4) Family outings and events like birthday parties and trips to a state park.

5) Taking video of myself and my buddies shooting different stages at a USPSA or IDPA match.

6) Something pocket sized that would always be in reach at work or when out shopping, but take better quality images than my cell phone!

Perhapse I can tap the experience of those here toselecting a small assortment of equipment, say two or three pieces, that will work together to do a farr better job of meeting most of my needs, than any single expensive camera ever could. Any thoughts or suggestions welcome.
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Old Jan 10, 2009, 2:51 PM   #2
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What's your budget?
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Old Jan 10, 2009, 2:56 PM   #3
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I'm still in the planning stages, and wouldn't nessisarity buy everything at once, so the budget is a little flexible, but small. Ideally, I'd like to keep everything under 2K.
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Old Jan 10, 2009, 3:20 PM   #4
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Let mestart off by sayingthat dSLRs are designed to be adaptable, so that they can be the best possible photographic instrument for any purpose. The tough part would be "... pocket sized ...", but for that, you could get a second P&S digicam. That is actually a common practice. All the things you said you wnat to do, a dSLR could do very well. What you didn't say was what you might want to do with "pocket sized" versus something that isn't. A $500-$700 dSLR with suitable lenses and accessories, plus a compact P&S Digicam could be had for less that $2K. How does that sound?
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Old Jan 10, 2009, 3:34 PM   #5
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Pretty much what I had in mind, a simple pocket camera for carrying around and family events like birthday parties, a DSLR for astro-photography, taking on family trips and nature photography, I know most do short video clips, but would possibly prefer a seperate camcorder for for video.
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Old Jan 10, 2009, 4:13 PM   #6
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I would want a couple of compacts. For my survival cam a Samsung TL9. And for my ├╝ber kool wonder cam a Canon SD990 IS. Together they would take about a $560 USD bite out ofthe budget. Duz that leave enough for the DSLR kit?

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Old Jan 11, 2009, 10:43 AM   #7
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Any dSLR can be connected to a telescope or microsocope with a standard T-Mount adapter. Most dSLRs, however, do not support autoexposure when using a T-Mount adapter, and the T-Mount adapter is an open tube with no optics, so it is a likelypath through which dust might get into your dSLR. You should select a dSLR with a good dust handling process and/or get used to the idea of cleaning your own image sensor. It is not a difficult taks, but it can be daunting, none the less.

For family shots, the kit lens generally does well, but the kit lenses that come with certain dSLRs are not very good. The optical quality of the kit lens is something you should consider when making your choice. and you may want to consider whether you want the kit lens at all. There are many lenses that are much better than some of the kit lenses available, and may have a number of advantages as well.

"Nature Photography" can mean a lot of different things, and can require different things with regard to a dSLR. You would want a macro lens (or some other aparatus for getting closer) for a flower or insect, and you might want a long lens for birds and other wildlife. Telephoto zoom lenses are common and inexensive, but good ones are less common and less inexpensive. You need to decide how much you want to do this.

I will leave it to someone else to talk about a "simple pocket camera."
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Old Jan 12, 2009, 6:47 PM   #8
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http://www.bestinclass.com/digital-cameras

They list cameras by usage, (like action or wildlife photos...) pricerange and other criteria. No nebula photography though.
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Old Jan 12, 2009, 7:20 PM   #9
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If you need cheap and resonable price, Those camera is for you. They are used in very good condition or like new condition. From 7.1 MP to 8.0 MP
Kodax, Sanyo, Olympus digital camera. Price from $49 to $69. Search for SELLFORLESSCBUS on Amazon:
https://catalog.amazon.com/abis/deta...sin=B000QDVNHK
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Old Jan 13, 2009, 11:36 AM   #10
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Quote:
....1) Taking Astro-images like nebula's, galaxies, star clusters, planets, even the ever changing surface of the Sun!...


6) Something pocket sized that would always be in reach at work or when out shopping, but take better quality images than my cell phone!
You need two cameras:- a dSLR with good lenses, and a pocket camera. These will differ in price by a factor of about 10.

Over the latter, if you can find them, try the Rollei range.I bought an excellent one for my daughter for Xmas. This was sentimental for me, as I owned a tiny and much loved pocket Rollei35 film camera in the olden days. It drowned in a boating accident.
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