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Old Feb 8, 2009, 3:06 PM   #31
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I'm starting to think about the accessories now. For example, should I get the 4GB EXtreme III 30 Mbps SD card? Or just a regular speed one?
You may find Rob Galbraith's tests to be helpful. It doesn't like he's got the XS in his database. But, he's got the XSi on this page:

http://www.robgalbraith.com/bins/cam...?cid=6007-9424

At some point, the camera versus the card is usually going to become the bottleneck. For example, you may buy a card that would test twice as fast in some devices. Yet, only see a small gain in throughput (or sometimes, no speed increase at all). So, you'll tend to get diminishing returns with faster cards after a given speed (because the camera may not be able to write to media any faster).

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Old Feb 8, 2009, 5:56 PM   #32
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Hey everyone, I just have a question about self-cleaning image sensors.

John, sorry to hijack your thread.

Sorry to hijack your thread but I'm having the same issues deciding between a D40 or D60. In the discussion forums on Amazon, everyone swears by the D40 because of Ken Rockwell's site.

I was leaning towards the D40 for some time, but a friend told me to consider the D60 or D80 because of the Image Sensor Cleaning System. What I was told--but I'm not sure whether it's true or not--is that switching lenses creates the potential for dust to get on the image sensors which is pretty terrible from the way he put it (???). In his words this has the potential to ruin pictures, potentially ruin your camera, and is difficult to clean?

I'm pretty much a novice with dSLRs, but if this self-cleaning image sensor is necessary for someone who plans on switching lenses, I will definitely spend more money for a camera like the D60. Any truth to this claim?

I've been leaning towards the D60 over the D40 because it's on the best camera's list on this site. But I'm on a budget as well and the D40's price tag seems pretty nice.
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Old Feb 8, 2009, 6:00 PM   #33
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The only sensor cleaning system that seems to work very well is the system in the Olympus dSLR models.

Most of the time, even if you get dust, it's not going to show up in your photos unless you're stopping down the aperture quite a bit (using higher f/stop settings like f/16 for more depth of field). Even then, it's probably only going to be visible in brighter areas of the frame like the sky in an outdoor image. But, eventually you'll probably want to clean the camera's sensor with most dSLR models, even ones with a dust reduction system (with the possible exception of Olympus dSLR models, since their dust reduction system seems to work well).


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Old Feb 8, 2009, 8:59 PM   #34
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No problem, calbear.

Ok since I'll probably just save up for the 430 flash, my question is if I should get the 50mm 1.8 lens now (it's about $89 bucks), or just save up to get the 50mm 1.4 someday. I know the 1.4 is better of course, but I wonder if the 1.8 is a good alternative?
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Old Feb 17, 2009, 10:46 PM   #35
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Hey guys. Which filter would you recommend for a 18-55mm lens?

I'm thinking about either Hoya or B+W.

These options:

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc....html#features

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc....html#features

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...0.html#reviews
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Old Feb 18, 2009, 7:54 AM   #36
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johncd wrote:
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Hey guys. Which filter would you recommend for a 18-55mm lens? ...
None of the above.

The 18-55 kit lens already has a problem with vignetting, and adding a filter will make it worse. You could use a thin filter to reduce the effect:

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc..._Haze_010.html

But thin filters don't have the threads on the outside, so you can't put another filter on it, and your lens cap has nothing to latch onto.
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Old Feb 18, 2009, 8:47 AM   #37
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TCav wrote:
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johncd wrote:
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Hey guys. Which filter would you recommend for a 18-55mm lens? ...
None of the above.

The 18-55 kit lens already has a problem with vignetting, and adding a filter will make it worse. You could use a thin filter to reduce the effect:

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc..._Haze_010.html

But thin filters don't have the threads on the outside, so you can't put another filter on it, and your lens cap has nothing to latch onto.
Yikes. That one's out of my price range.

I had no idea about the vignetting problems. I just wanted one for extra protection against dust. Can you show me an example of this problem?
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Old Feb 18, 2009, 9:41 AM   #38
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Vignetting is when the sides and especially the corners of an image are dimmer than the center. The problem isn't significant at longer focal lengths or stopped down a little, but at it's wide end and with the aperture wide open, it can be noticeable. Adding a conventional filter to the lens will increase the vignetting to the point where you may find it objectionable.

I have a Tamron 17-50mm f/2.8 lens that I like a lot, and that cost me over $400. I bought a filter to protect it, but the extra vignetting bothered me, so I bought a thin filter for it, but then I couldn't get the lens cap to stay on. Now I just use the lens hood and exercise caution.
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Old Feb 18, 2009, 10:24 AM   #39
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TCav wrote:
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Vignetting is when the sides and especially the corners of an image are dimmer than the center. The problem isn't significant at longer focal lengths or stopped down a little, but at it's wide end and with the aperture wide open, it can be noticeable. Adding a conventional filter to the lens will increase the vignetting to the point where you may find it objectionable.

I have a Tamron 17-50mm f/2.8 lens that I like a lot, and that cost me over $400. I bought a filter to protect it, but the extra vignetting bothered me, so I bought a thin filter for it, but then I couldn't get the lens cap to stay on. Now I just use the lens hood and exercise caution.
So it's quite noticeable with a filter? Damn
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Old Feb 18, 2009, 7:53 PM   #40
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What is a prosumer camera?
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