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Old Mar 27, 2009, 12:22 PM   #11
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Doing DOF is easy, reducing the dof is less so.

I have a Canon SX1 and mainly use it to shoot video but if you look at this example you will see sections where I've reduced the dof to lose the background.

http://www.vimeo.com/2785226

To reduce the dof you need to be close to your subject and use the long end of the lens with the aperture close down as much as possible.

It is not easy to have a shallow dof on say a person but you can if it is only the head.

For smaller objects such as the birds in this example as well as the leaves you can do it easily.
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Old Mar 27, 2009, 12:31 PM   #12
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UGH I wish this was easier :sad:
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Old Mar 27, 2009, 12:37 PM   #13
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I've spent about $18,000 on kit and still haven't covered all I would like
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Old Mar 27, 2009, 12:42 PM   #14
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lol. Well I just keep going back and forth. I think I am going to get the Panasonic. Hopefully it will have good image quality and such. :?
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Old Mar 29, 2009, 9:43 PM   #15
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Be forewarned that with a dslr there is no end to the additional expenses you can occur. If you equip it at the outset with a superzoom lens near like that of the Panasonic you will have a lot more invested. If you get a shorter lens you will probably want to add others as you see the limitations of the shorter lens. However, the super zoom has shortcomings too, so you will likely want other lenses with wider apertures, etc. On the other hand, that Panasonic has a Leica lens of superior quality, and may be one of the best buys in a P&S. I never fail to be amazed at what the camera can do. I have both that Panasonic and its predecessor FZ18, as well as several dslrs, and while I prefer to use the dslrs, I have not been disappointed with the Panasonics - they are small and light and very capable as all-in-one cameras. As with all Panasonics, however, you have to be careful to manage digital noise, as Panasonic's noise suppression algorithm favors sharpness over noise reduction.

Some of have forgetten what it is like to be a beginner. I will never forget how nonplussed I was when I first taught in a photography class and realized how clueless some raw beginners can be, not even knowing an f-stop from a bus stop!. This Panasonic is not a budget buster, and if you grow beyond it, you can still move up and keep the Panny as a backup or something to carry with you when you are not on a photo shoot. Remember that whatever you buy, it will probably be obsolete before long anyway - digital technology move at a breakneck pace - so no beginner's camera is a lifetime investment, nor should it be, as your preferences will surely change with experience. There are a number of excellent dslr systems available - every photographer has a favorite and it isn't always the best seller, either - which one would be right for you? If you plunge into a system now, you will soon build up an investment which will make it more difficult to change as you add to it. When you get into photography, you will develop a set of preferences and be better able to make an intelligent choice for yourself - someone else's favorite may not be right for you, so it makes sense to me to start with a point and shoot. You could be discouraged by a dslr which requires more knowledge. If a p&s is a requirement for your class, the decision has been made for you, although the instructor probably has a simpler camera then the FZ28 in mind. This particular Panasonic can be complicated, but it can also be simple as it has a do-everything "intelligent auto" mode, so it is an ideal camera to grow with.
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Old May 12, 2009, 3:30 PM   #16
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You mean an f-stop is not the same as a bus stop? egad!!

Just so you know, i am a beginner. I came across this thread because I have finally narrowed it down to these 2 cameras. (panasonic fz28 and canon sx10) It seems most people are choosing the Panasonic. The one thing I do like better about the Canon is the zoom goes to 560mm and panasonic only to 486mm. but I guess that maybe that wont matter since i can just crop and enlarge.

Thanks for everyone's input (even the ones I dont understand )
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Old May 13, 2009, 8:24 PM   #17
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Michelle-

We really want to help you with your camera choice. Cost seems to be a real hurdle for you. Although, it may indeed not be the best choice out there, why not consider a Kodak Z-1012 camera. It has 10mp, 12X Optical Zoom, full IS, both full automatic and full manual controls, while still selling for LESS THAN $(US)200.00.

Your cost exposure is a good deal less. It is a point and shoot camera. And it is very capable camera of excellent image quality.

Sarah Jpyce
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