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Old May 26, 2009, 4:59 PM   #1
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Default Looking for Point & Shoot that....

I'm currently in the market for a Point and Shoot that takes quality pics like a DSLR..

Anyone know if that exists?

Thanks in advance..
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Old May 26, 2009, 6:07 PM   #2
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The point and shoot superzoom cameras like the Panasonic FZ-28 and the Sony H-50 can compete rather successfully when doing outdoor landscapes and indoor flash photos under 20 feet, when a good slave flash is used. However, when the light level falls measurably and flash is not being used, or when fast action sports are the subject, then the DSLR cameras command the the photo environment.

The reason that point and shoot cameras can never supplant a DSLR camera is simple. Generally speaking DSLR cameras have larger, faster lenses, and imagers that are 15 to 20 times the size of the imager used in even the APS-C category of DSLR cameras. Therefore, the very small CCD imager used in most point and shoot cameras have a difficult time with high ISO setings that produce a lot of visible noise in their images.

So only in a few outdoor, daylight situations will point and shoot cameras ever come close to really competing.

Sarah Joyce
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Old May 26, 2009, 7:19 PM   #3
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Sarah is correct on the image sensor sizes and noise, but you don't have to only look at super zoom P&S cameras. You may want something smaller, yet offering many of the same manual controls found on DSLRs. Two that come to mind are the Canon G10 and the Panasonic LX3. The LX3 is quite popular, and of late are out of stock at many of the reputable dealers. Those that are not so reputable are jacking up their prices to see what the market will bear.

Here is a link to a comparison of the G10 to a $40,000 Hasselblad. Their point is printing at "normal" sizes won't really show the differences.

Dennis
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Old May 26, 2009, 7:57 PM   #4
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Thanks everyone for the quick responses. I'll be taking pics of mostly cars but i was wondering how I can get pics to end up looking like this..



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Old May 27, 2009, 5:47 AM   #5
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I'm not certain what is challenging about the two images above. The top one requires the use of flash, perhaps forcing the flash to fire, as well as exposing for daylight. This is generally called fill flash, but most often used when you are taking pictures of people with the full sunlight coming from behind them. In your photo the boat closest to the camera is properly lit from the flash, but the boats beyond are not, since the camera's flash does not reach that far.

The bottom photo seems rather normal, so what is the challenge for this one? Sorry, I don't get it.

Dennis
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Old May 27, 2009, 7:05 AM   #6
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In truth both photos look like they could easily be taken by a number of point and shoot cameras. In fact, looking at them it appears both photos were taken by a point and shoot.

The only potentially challenging about both shots is they are somewhat of a wide angle - but there are models that have a wide angle.
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Old May 27, 2009, 8:35 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by denncald View Post
...Here is a link to a comparison of the G10 to a $40,000 Hasselblad...Dennis
Good idea, & great link, Dennis! Here is a link to a more mundane comparison. It's quite old, and aimed at the typical customers of my local camera shop, but still mostly valid.

http://www.wrexham-cameras.com/WHATS-NEW/TEST-KOD-CAN.htm

(The 'low light' comments there assume that one's using the built-in flashguns.)

The most important camera accessory is the person behind the camera. I have an ex-pro-photographer friend whose shots would almost always surpass mine in the same circumstances even if we swapped his dSLR for my superzoom.

The exception would be difficult lighting conditions or fast action where the dSLR is clearly superior in the hands of anyone who knows how to use it.

But his shots would still be better composed than mine.

Last edited by Alan T; May 27, 2009 at 8:38 AM.
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Old May 27, 2009, 6:14 PM   #8
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OK-

I think that we are in agreement. Point and Shoot cameras can only come close to a DSLR camera in only a very few instances. Isn't the next logical question: What P & S cameras do come close?

IMO probably the Canon G-10, the Nikon P-6000, and the Panasonic LX-3 are in a category you can call "prosumer P & S cameras." If you want at P & S superzoom, the Kodak Z-712, Z-1012, Panasonic FZ-28, Nikon P-=90, and Sony H-50 are excellent in their own group. Any other suggestions?

Sarah Joyce

Last edited by mtclimber; May 28, 2009 at 12:01 PM.
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