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-   -   Replace GX10 with E-410? (https://forums.steves-digicams.com/what-camera-should-i-buy/156544-replace-gx10-e-410-a.html)

benjie Jun 20, 2009 7:32 AM

Replace GX10 with E-410?
 
Hi- I recently bought the Samsung GX10, twin to the K10D, and I also find it too heavy, being of a fragile persuasion, especially when coupled with the Tamron 18-250. I was thinking of maybe going for the Olympus E-420, which is quite cheap, with the 18-180 zoom. But it doesn't have shake reduction. Would I be disappointed with IQ? Any advice please? Thanks.

JimC Jun 20, 2009 8:04 AM

That depends on what you want to shoot.

If you go that route, I'd make sure that you're OK with the focal range of that lens. Keep in mind that because the Olympus dSLR models use a smaller sensor compared to the APS-C size sensor in your existing camera, you'll have a narrower angle of view for a given focal length lens.

So, an 18-180mm lens on a 4/3 system body would give you the same angle of view you'd have using a 36-360mm lens on a 35mm camera. You have to multiply the focal length by 2x to see how they compare.

With your existing camera, your 18-250mm lens would give you the same angle of view you'd have using a 27-375mm lens on a 35mm camera. You have to multiply by 1.5x to see how they compare.

IOW, your existing lens would start out with a wider angle of view (and in some conditions, you can only back up so far to fit what you want into the frame).

So, I'd make sure you're OK with that focal range if you go that route (as you may find that an angle of view equivalent to 36mm on a 35mm camera is not wide enough in some conditions).

As for stablization, again, it's going to depend on what you want to shoot. If you shoot in lower light at slower shutter speeds often without a tripod or flash, you may need to use a much higher ISO speed to prevent blur from camera shake with that Olympus solution.

The "rule of thumb" is that shutter speeds should be 1/focal length or faster to prevent blur from camera shake (and you need to use the "35mm equivalent" focal length for calculations). The longer the focal length, the faster your shutter speed will need to be (since blur from camera shake is magnified as focal lengths get longer). That's just a rule of thumb (since some users can hold a camera steadier than others allowing slower shutter speeds, and some users may require even faster shutter speeds to reduce blur from shake).

You'll need to decide how you use a camera more often to make a better informed decision, keeping things like the focal range of the lens and blur from camera shake in mind. But, if you're not comfortable with the size and weight of your existing camera, you may not use it as often, and if it's sitting on a shelf, you won't enjoy it (so keep convenience in mind, too).

benjie Jun 20, 2009 8:19 AM

Thanks for the info. Maybe I'd be better off with the 14-42 and 40-150 lenses. It's just that I'm lazy and don't like changing lenses!

JimC Jun 20, 2009 8:22 AM

BTW, I moved your posts to this thread by itself (since you started your questions in an old thread from 2008).

JimC Jun 20, 2009 8:31 AM

You'll have to decide how much you'd use the wider end. But, as a general rule, you'll get better image quality using a lens with a less ambitious focal range from wide to long anyway (versus trying to use a single lens to cover the same range).

fldspringer Jun 20, 2009 8:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by benjie (Post 978702)
Thanks for the info. Maybe I'd be better off with the 14-42 and 40-150 lenses. It's just that I'm lazy and don't like changing lenses!

The Samsung will do better at high ISO. That will be the one thing you will be giving up, along with stabilization.

Those kit lenses are quite good, and the big benefit will be the weight you would be carrying with the camera, Those lenses are featherweight in comparison to the superzoom.

Changing lenses of that size is no sweat. Oly has a super dust buster that removes that fear in large part.

If both size and stabilization are primary, then you may want to spend a bit more for the E620. Its similar in size.

Greg

benjie Jun 20, 2009 12:25 PM

I've just happened to see the E-410 in a local dealers. They were prepared to sell me the camera plus both lenses for around 250 (display model). Sounds quite a bargain. I was tempted but not sure about the handling- nothing to grip with the right hand. And I have to save some more pennies before I can afford it.

TCav Jun 20, 2009 12:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by benjie (Post 978691)
Hi- I recently bought the Samsung GX10, twin to the K10D, and I also find it too heavy, being of a fragile persuasion, especially when coupled with the Tamron 18-250. I was thinking of maybe going for the Olympus E-420, which is quite cheap, with the 18-180 zoom. But it doesn't have shake reduction. Would I be disappointed with IQ? Any advice please? Thanks.

The Pentax setup weighs a total of 41 oz., while the Olympus setup weighs 28.7 oz. That's A 30% reduction in weight; not an insignificant amount. But since you're "of a fragile persuasion", pewrhaps you would benefit from image stabilization. The E-520 is stabilized and only weights an additional 1.5 oz.

But ...

Quote:

Originally Posted by benjie (Post 978702)
Maybe I'd be better off with the 14-42 and 40-150 lenses. It's just that I'm lazy and don't like changing lenses!

Since you don't like changing lenses, perhaps you'd be better off with a superzoom P&S. Stabilized or not, it would weigh a lot less that anything mentioned here. And nothing you've said would indicate to me that you need a dSLR.

JimC Jun 20, 2009 1:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by benjie (Post 978764)
I was tempted but not sure about the handling- nothing to grip with the right hand.

How a camera "feels" can be important if you're using one a lot.

For example, I have both a Konica Minolta Maxxum 5D and a newer Sony A700 (which is a larger and heavier camera). My A700 "feels" lighter to me (especially when using it for extended periods) as compared to my Konica Minolta Maxxum 5D (even though the my 5D is a smaller and lighter camera), probably because of the way the weight is being distributed with the larger body (with it's larger grip surface) as opposed to more of the weight being concentrated in a smaller package.

A larger and heavier body can also have better balance with some lenses (so that the camera/lens combination isn't as "front heavy"). But, a different user may find the smaller camera to be a better fit. One size does not always fit all. ;-) So, I'd make sure you're comfortable with any camera/lens combination you choose from an ergonomics perspective.

mtngal Jun 20, 2009 4:51 PM

Have you checked out the Pentax K-M (K2000)? It is significantly lighter than the K10, at 525g body only (heavier than the Oly camera but significantly less than the over 700g the K10 weighs). This would allow you to keep the lens you already have (saves you money), it has the same sensor as the K10 and includes in-camera stabilization.


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