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Old Jul 18, 2009, 8:00 AM   #1
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Default Which Camera??

Hello,
I'm crazy to start in DLSR, I would like a good camera that will last long!!
The price I'm looking does not matter so much but i want one that will not require me to buy a new one for like 5 years or so.
I'm undecided on:
Nikon D90
Nikon D5000
Canon 500D


Which one would be the best for great shots? best features? best image quality (in high iso)??
Anyone please comment and say your thoughts!
Thank You in advance
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Old Jul 18, 2009, 9:26 AM   #2
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All good choices, but I would drop the D5000 because of the lack of an internal autofocus motor. That limits your selection of lenses to about half the new Nikon mount lenses, and very few of the used Nikon mount lenses.

An important criterion should be how the camera feels to you. If you can't comfortably hold it, if you can't find the controls and commands when you need them, you will be disappointed with the camera. And 5 years is a long time to keep a camera you're not comfortable with.
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Old Jul 18, 2009, 9:35 AM   #3
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Bruno-

You must first realize that you are essentially buying into a complete system simply because the initial body that you purchase will dictate the lens mount on the lenses that you purchase, perhaps the type of dedicated external flash that you purchase.

Likewise, your style of shooting as well as the kind of photo that you take will also play into your camera decision. For example sport shooters are sometimes better served by the Canon system. And even which sports that you are photographing can be a factor.

So let's begin this preparing for this camera search with a general analysis of what you shoot, something about your style of shooting, and some information about the camera or cameras that you are currently using. Think of it like getting the right size and style of shoes. You provide the above information and we can be much more efficient at helping you select the right DSLR camera for you.

All of the consumer level DSLR cameras are good and will produce great photos. What we want to do is to get you a personal match that works best for you.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Jul 19, 2009, 3:29 AM   #4
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TCav
Thanks for your response.
The lack of internal autofocus is really a big negative. Why would they not put it!?!
Thanks
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Old Jul 19, 2009, 3:44 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mtclimber View Post
Bruno-

So let's begin this preparing for this camera search with a general analysis of what you shoot, something about your style of shooting, and some information about the camera or cameras that you are currently using. Think of it like getting the right size and style of shoes. You provide the above information and we can be much more efficient at helping you select the right DSLR camera for you.

All of the consumer level DSLR cameras are good and will produce great photos. What we want to do is to get you a personal match that works best for you.

Sarah Joyce
Hello Sarah Joyce
I like taking photos of many things, for example: Beaches, Animals, Plants, Sky, Buildings, SunSets/Sunrise, Micro (close-up shots), Race (when I go to one), Bugs, Night Shots (bridges, buildings).
These are the ones I can think of right now.
The camera I use at the moment is a Sony T700 (compact)
If you would like to see some of the pictures I have taken please check this link:
http://dslr.sony.com.au/SonyAlpha/So...1487-12-1.aspx
Do you need any more information? if yes just ask.
Thank You for your time to help me!!!
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Old Jul 19, 2009, 7:18 AM   #6
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For what you want to shoot, I'd say there isn't much difference between the Nikon D90 and the Canon 500D. Pick the one you like.
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Old Jul 19, 2009, 10:42 AM   #7
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One thing I dislike about the options listed is the fact that none of these cameras have in-body IS. As a result, if you want to take advantage of an image stabilization system, you must buy the more expensive lenses that have IS. In other words, you end up paying for IS over and over again. Many people find IS an unnecessary feature. I find it extremely helpful and it will definitely increase the number of usable shots in precarious light conditions or when shooting with long zooms. So, I'd at least take a look at some of the Sony, Pentax and Olympus models. If movie capability is a definite must, Sony has one of the best implementations, IMO.
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Old Jul 19, 2009, 2:33 PM   #8
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bruno-

Thanks for your reply. It would appear that any of the consumer level DSLR cameras on the market today could nicely fill your needs. That being said, two additional issues have been raised.

The need to use AF-S type Lens on the Nikon D-5000:

There are currently over 45 lens available for the Nikon D-5000 camera. They are available in all focal lengths and a wide varsity of price points. Personally, I have never perceived that as a real problem. However, that is indeed an issue you will have to decide if you move forward with purchasing the Nikon D-5000 camera.

Do you want IS? Should it be in the Camera Body or the Lens?

I am a photographer who likes and appreciates IS. IS is available either in the lens you are using, or in the camera body. In a Nikon camera like the D-5000, it is not available in the camera body. Therefore, for the Nikon D-5000, if you want IS you will have to purchase it in the lens. Most folks choosing the D-5000 will get the kit lens with the camera. That kit lens is a Nikon 18-55mm lens. I does not have IS. The second most commonly used lens is the Nikon 55-200mm VR lens. That lens has IS which Nikpn calls VR, meaning Vibration Reduction. The lens costs between $(US) 200.00 and 230.00. It is an excellent lens and it is when you use zoom that you will really need IS/VR. That lens is a great value.

The typical camera companies who feature IS built into the camera body are: Pentax and Sony. So you must investigate their DSLR cameras to see if they have a model that appeals to you.

Is having IS in the lens rather than in the body better? Many arguments have been put forward over they years one one side and the other. Personally in my opinion, one method is just about as good as the other method.

I hope that information helps.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Jul 19, 2009, 7:21 PM   #9
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Sarah Joyce, Tullio, TCav
Thanks for the response.

I have realized that those cameras have no IS build in.
I have researched the new Sony Alphas which have IS and I was interested in one of them before I changed my mind to a nikon. I really like the design on the new alpha 380/330, but my only concern is that they are exactly the same as the old 350, but in a newer designed body.
I haven't seen any reviews on those sony cameras yet, but since it has the same imaging system I think there will be no difference in image quality.
Between the Sony 380 and a Nikon D90 I have seen that the Nikon has higher image quality and a better iso with less noise. But the D90 lacks in built in IS.
Does anyone think the Sony 380 or 330 is another option to a Canon 500d or a Nikon D90 or D5000??
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Old Jul 19, 2009, 7:30 PM   #10
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Bruno-

No, I, personally, do not believe that the Sony A-380 is a viable/or good alternative option to the Nikon D-90. For high ISO shooting it is hard to beat the Nikon D-90 or the D-5000.

Let's get down to the nitty-gritty. IS/VR is nice, but if you pay attention to your shutter speed versus the lens focal length, you never have a problem.

How much zoom do you need. The D-5000 and the D-90 both come with the Nikon 18-105 mm VR lens as their kit lens. That is a great lens. Is that enough zoom for you? If so, now you have your DSLR with a VR/IS equipped lens and you are set.

It is very important to define your exact personal needs.

Sarah Joyce
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