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Old Aug 2, 2009, 5:46 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by arafique View Post
Hi, Actually I am looking to buy a Macro Lens or filter for my Nikon D60 with lens AF-S DX VR ZOOM-NIKKOR 55-200MM F/4-5.6G. I normally take birds eye picture in detail .. My question can someone suggest what kind of macro filter should I buy for my Camera?

Thanks
"macro filter" is more properly called a "closeup lens" or "closeup attachment". They are sometimes called a "diopter", though this is sloppy slang since "diopter" is not an item but the unit of strength in which these attachements are calibrated.

As mentioned in earlier posts, the generic closeup lenses, which are usually sold in sets of three strengths, are all rather poor quality. They will work and can deliver decent IQ (image quality) in the center, but the outer portions of the image will suffer substantially.

There are a few decent attachments out there. The Canon 250D (+4 diopter) and 500D (+2 diopter) are excellent and the 500D is frequently recommended for use with longer lenses like your 55-200 zoom. Nikon no longer manufacturers their premium closeup attachments. If you come across a reasonably priced Nikon #3T (+1.5 dipoter) or 4T (+3 diopter) they would be good buys; they are both 52mm diameter. The 62mm size equivalents were numbered 5T and 6T, respectively. Like Canon's, the Nikon closeups are excellent. Neither will match a good true macro for copywork, they can be as good for macro wildlife and macro landscape work (e.g. bugs and flowers and ...) since the extreme edges of such images are almost never exactly the same distance as the center. Also, the small barrel or pincushion distortion your zoom has is not an issue in such images whereas it would be a major flaw when doing copywork.
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Old Aug 2, 2009, 6:04 PM   #12
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If you can possibly swing it, I think that a macro lens is the way you should go - it would give you the best quality. True macro lenses, ones capable of doing 1:1 (where a 1 cm object will take up 1 cm on the sensor) come in a variety of focal lengths. While all will give you the same magnification, they will do so at different distances from the subject. I would recommend getting one that is 100 mm or longer (180 and 200 mm macro lenses can get expensive quickly) rather than one of the 35-50 mm ones. That will allow you to stand off a bit, and I would imagine that you would not want to be an inch or two from your subject.
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Old Aug 3, 2009, 1:04 AM   #13
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There are three ways to do macrophotography.

You can use a close-up lens or filter. It fits on the end of an existing lens, attaching to the filter mounting screw threads. These are generally not very good, and they magnify the flaws in the lens it's attached to. These are the least expensive way to do macro work, but produce the lowest quality results.

You can use an extension tube. It fits between the lens and the camera body. Since they don't contain any optics of their own, they don't make th eimage any worse, but since they magnify the subject more than a close-up lens, they also magnify the flaws in the lens to a greater degree. Since they fit between the lens and the body, entension tubes are the least convenient way to do macrophotography.

You can use a macro lens. This is the best and most convenient way to to macrophotography, but it's also the most expensive.

If you think you can get what you want with a close-up lens, get a good one. Cheap ones will introduce too many flaws of their own. The OEM close-up lenses are some of the best, along with B + W, Heliopan and Hoya.

Thanks for your reply. I am sorry I can not afford this lens very expensive! any cheap solution
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Old Aug 3, 2009, 1:54 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by dwig View Post
"macro filter" is more properly called a "closeup lens" or "closeup attachment". They are sometimes called a "diopter", though this is sloppy slang since "diopter" is not an item but the unit of strength in which these attachements are calibrated.

As mentioned in earlier posts, the generic closeup lenses, which are usually sold in sets of three strengths, are all rather poor quality. They will work and can deliver decent IQ (image quality) in the center, but the outer portions of the image will suffer substantially.

There are a few decent attachments out there. The Canon 250D (+4 diopter) and 500D (+2 diopter) are excellent and the 500D is frequently recommended for use with longer lenses like your 55-200 zoom. Nikon no longer manufacturers their premium closeup attachments. If you come across a reasonably priced Nikon #3T (+1.5 dipoter) or 4T (+3 diopter) they would be good buys; they are both 52mm diameter. The 62mm size equivalents were numbered 5T and 6T, respectively. Like Canon's, the Nikon closeups are excellent. Neither will match a good true macro for copywork, they can be as good for macro wildlife and macro landscape work (e.g. bugs and flowers and ...) since the extreme edges of such images are almost never exactly the same distance as the center. Also, the small barrel or pincushion distortion your zoom has is not an issue in such images whereas it would be a major flaw when doing copywork.
Appreciate your input, thank you so much
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Old Aug 3, 2009, 3:51 AM   #15
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Thanks for your reply. I am sorry I can not afford this lens very expensive! any cheap solution
If you've got a good lens to start with, you can use extension tubes. They don't cost as much as a macro lens, and don't impose any flaws of their own, but they magnify the flaws in any lens you use them with, so that lens should be pretty good to start with. Your Nikkor 55-200 VR should do well.

Adorama has these: http://www.adorama.com/KNAETSDNKAF.html
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Old Aug 7, 2009, 12:07 PM   #16
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For 18 bucks you can get a plus 1,2,4,10. This Macro filter four pack also comes double threaded so you can stack them and get a plus 17. I have this and it works real great. I would prefer a macro lens for the best results but my wallet is up to it right now if you know what i mean. You'll be happy with them!

http://www.cameta.com/Digital-Concep...52mm-33647.cfm
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