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Old Sep 11, 2009, 12:25 AM   #301
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anthony_b View Post
for good close out deals on cameras, check here :
http://www.searsoutlet.com/d/index.jsp

HEY!!! You know how to make a grown man cry...I found a Sony H20 for $140-$200 (US) here........and when i check the canadian site..nothing.

But they did have the A230........for $30 more then the store down the street...
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Old Sep 13, 2009, 9:10 PM   #302
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Default Enhancing the Color in Your Sunset Shots

Enhancing the Color in Your Sunset Shots-

A few folks on this thread really liked my sunset shot taken on the evening of 09/09/2009. I have again attached that image to this post as I will be explaining the technique that I used to capture that photo. The technique that I used for that shot was all done with the Sony A-230 camera. The technique that I used can be used with any digital camera.

I used the Exposure Compensation feature of the Sony A-230 to enhance the color of the sunset. When you use the minus side of Exposure Compensation, it actually enhances the color a bit by doing two things: (1) It darkens the photo slightly. (2) It increases the color saturation in the photo somewhat.

The obvious and very logical question to ask is: How much minus Exposure Compensation, do I use? Well, I usually begin with the Exposure Compensation set at EV-1.0. I take the photo and then look at the LCD to evaluate the exposure.

When I looked at the photo taken at EV-1.0, I could still see some over exposure in the photo. You have to be at peace with the idea that this is a trial and error process Because there was still some over exposure evident, I made a further increase in the Exposure Compensation.

Using a trial and error process, I progressively advanced or increased the Exposure Compensation feature from EV-1.0 to -1.3, to -1.7, and finally to -2.0 where I was pleased with the photo result.

Have a great day.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Sep 13, 2009, 9:13 PM   #303
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Default Using External Flash with the Sony A-230 Camera

Using External Flash with the Sony A-230:

For the attached photo, taken from a distance of 40 feet, I attached the Sony HVL-F56AM external flash. I chose the external flash because of the distance from my subject from my camera. The A-230’s built-in flash can only reach out effectively to about 15 to 20 feet, and that extended Flash Range is only achieved by numerically increasing the ISO setting. With the ISO set to ISO 100, the A-230’s built in flash has a Flash Range of only 12 feet.

The lens used in this photo sample that is attached, is the lens that I have begun to use as my “walk around” lens. It is a Sigma 18-125 mm lens that I purchased recently for S(US) 146.00. Sigma recently introduced an IS equipped version of this lens at a selling price of $(US) 399.00. Sigma, one of the largest manufacturers of third party lenses calls their version of IS, “OS” meaning Optical Stabilization. When the OS version of the Sigma 18-125 mm lens was introduced, that immediately began to force down the price of the non OS equipped version of the lens.

Because all Sony brand DSLR cameras have in body IS built into the camera, I knew that I did not need an OS version of that Sigma 18-125 mm lens. And, I could save some substantial money by purchasing the non OS equipped version of the lens. So as you can see, I saved well over $(US) 200.00 with that lens purchase. That is just another way a Sony can save you money when compared to Canon brand and Nikon brand DSLR camera that do not have in the camera body IS. Both Canon and Nikon charge extra for their IS equipped lenses.

OK, back to our attached photo, I was 40 feet away from my subject, our friend and boss, Cruise Director, Kirk Detweiler. I set the A-230 to “Auto ISO,” and I really was all set. The advantage of a dedicated Sony brand external flash is that the flash and the camera are able to electronically “talk” and work together. The Flash learns the exact camera to subject distance when the A-230 achieves focus. The flash also learns that the camera has been set on “Auto ISO.” Therefore, the flash programs it self for the correct amount of light output, and you, the photographer, get a perfect exposure.

External Flash units are both “smart” and easy to use. That is why I always recommend a good dedicated external flash unit when your budget allows it.

Have a great day.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Sep 13, 2009, 9:23 PM   #304
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Sarah Joyce,
Hope you and Bradley are having a great time! I posted a picture I would like you to look at, its under the Canon DSLR section. If you have time, please look at it and tell me what you think, part of the flower was a little fuzzy looking.

Suzie
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Old Sep 14, 2009, 3:41 AM   #305
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Hi Sarah...guess what??? I am trying the A230...I just got it and the battery is in the charger

Quik flash question ..you used the HVL-F56AM...what does the 56 mean?

And how is the HVLF42AM flash?

I hope your trip is going well...
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Old Sep 14, 2009, 8:47 PM   #306
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Default The Differences in External Flash Units

littlejohn-

Congratulations on your trial of the Sony A-230 camera! That is great news. Yes the external flash that I am using is the HVL-F56AM. The 56 is just a light output designator. Therefore, the HVL-F42AM is also an external flash, but with less light output. That is the only difference.

I prefer the external flash with the larger light output because I sometimes need to light long distances, such as this photo that I took today in the famous Red Dog Saloon, here in Juneau, Alaska. Note the long distance and the wide area lighted by that flash with a greater light output.

Have a great day.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Sep 14, 2009, 8:50 PM   #307
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Default Test Shots with the Sony A-230 at ISO 1600 & No Flash

09/14/2009

A-230 Test Shots at ISO 1600 without Flash

The photo was taken with the A-230 DSLR camera set to ISO 1600 and with no flash being used. The following post will show a similar photo taken with the Sony H-20 super zoom also at a high ISO setting. That will give you a direct comparison between a super zoom and the Sony a-230 DSLR camera.

I was pleased with the A-230 camera performance. Noise is present, but minimal. These photos demonstrate that the A-230 has much better no flash, ISO 1600 images that are markedly better than those that could be produced by your typical super zoom digital camera under similar lighting conditions.

Once again, the lens used was the Sigma 18-125 mm walk around lens that I like a lot.

Have a great day.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Sep 14, 2009, 8:53 PM   #308
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Default Sony H-50 Super Zoom Shot at ISO 800

09/14/2009

Sony H-50 Super Zoom Shot at ISO 800

In this post we have a very similar shot to the one posted above. This photo was taken with the Sony H-50 super zoom camera set to ISO 800 without using the camera’s built-in flash unit. On the Sony H-50, ISO 1600 has way too much electronic noise, so using ISO 1600 was not really a very good option at all.

However, this will give you another direct comparison of relatively the same photo from a DSRL camera and a super zoom camera.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Sep 14, 2009, 8:56 PM   #309
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Default Sony A-230 DSLR Camera at ISO 400

A-230 Test Shots at ISO 400 without Flash

Once again we will compare a Sony A-230 photo taken without flash and with the camera set to ISO 400 to a similar photo (posted below) taken at ISO 400 without flash with the Sony H-50 super zoom camera.

We hope that you are enjoying a great day.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Sep 14, 2009, 8:58 PM   #310
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Default Sony H-50 Super Zoom Shot at ISO 400 & No Flash

Sony H-50 Super Zoom Shot at ISO 400

This photo was taken with a Sony H-50 super zoom camera. No flash was used and the ISO was set to ISO 400. You can compare this photo taken with the Sony H-50 camera to the one directly above taken with the Sony A-230 DSLR camera.

Sarah Joyce
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