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Old Sep 18, 2009, 3:22 PM   #351
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Kunai-

Welcome to the Forum and to this thread. JimC and I are attempting to pump as much learning material as possible into this thread. So I apologize that it may indeed become somewhat technical at times.

Concerning your camera choice: if your budget is limited, the Panasonic FZ-35 might be the better choice. The FZ-28 is virtually impossible to fine now. And in going to a DSLR camera, the best budget is the Sony A-230 camera. However, it seem that you are looking for more zoom power, that will require another lens beyond just the basic A-230 camera and the Kit (18-55 mm) lens. You will probably want to add the Sony 55-200 mm lens as well. The A-230 two lens kit is available at www.sonystyle.com and www.adorama.com for $579.99, but that may be beyond your budget, perhaps?

I was a long time Panasonic FZ-28 shooter and I can tell you from experience that ISO 800 is a good setting to use in low light level conditions because it give you the best low light capability while minimizing electronic noise.

The Sony A-230 is a huge improvement as it can very comfortably use ISO 1600 and still minimize the electronic noise due to its much physically larger imager. But as you might expect the camera is also physically larger and more expensive in price.

Have a great day.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Sep 18, 2009, 3:25 PM   #352
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09/18/2009

Hi there, Folks-

Let’s focus our discussion on any camera’s Mode Selector this morning. While we cannot cover every single camera's Mode Selector precisely, we will cover the Auto, P, A, S, and M,
Modes that are found on most cameras that have both automatic and manual controls.

The Auto Mode:
This mode does not allow any adjustments at all. The camera is fixed in ISO auto, and Automatic Flash. The camera will measure the light and then set the exposure automatically and it cannot be changed.

The “P” Mode:
The “P” is actually an abbreviation, which stands for “Programed Auto” Mode. The camera measures the light, and actually determines the correct exposure for your camera. The “Programed” function of the names allows you to make some changes, such as increasing the ISO setting, or changing the camera’s flash mode which the camera will compensate for by once again measuring the light and the new ISO setting, or flash selection, and re-determining the correct exposure. There are indeed some adjustments that the camera will not compensate for at all. Exposure Compensation is an item the camera will not adjust for at all.

Thus, adding light through an Exposure Compensation setting of +1.0 will effectively over expose your photo, because the camera will not attempt to re-measure the light and adjust or re-set the exposure. The same is true for any minus Exposure Compensation.

The S Mode is often marked as Tv Mode on Canon Brand Cameras, but the effect is the same:
This Mode is called Shutter Preference Mode. This mode is designed to allow you to select the shutter speed, and the camera will then complete it calculation of the exposure based on your selected shutter speed requirement. If, you as the photographer, are anticipating action to occur in your photos you can use the S Mode so that a higher shutter speed can be used that will stop or “freeze” any action within your photo.

The “A” Mode, is sometimes marked Av on Canon Brand Cameras, but the effect is the same:
This mode is called Aperture Preference Mode. This mode is designed to allow you to select the Aperture that the camera will use. Based on the aperture selected, the camera then calculates the proper exposure. A good example of using aperture preference mode is the classic landscape shot taken with the camera mounted on a tripod. You desire to use a small aperture (that is an aperture with a numerically higher number) to obtain the greatest depth of field (the widest portion of the camera’s field of view that is in sharp focus) making as much area (from front to back) in the photo to have sharp focus. The smaller the aperture selected, the slower the shutter speed will be. However, a slow shutter speed would be of concern if you were hand holding the camera. But the camera is on a tripod, and the will hold the camera perfectly still, thus preventing any camera movement.

Please keep in mind that if your camera has built-in IS, in the camera body like the Sony A-230 DSLR camera has, when the camera is used on a tripod, the IS feature should be turned off, while the camera is on the tripod.

So there, in general summary form, is a discussion of each of the most commonly used modes on your camera’s Mode Selector. I hope that is helpful.

Have a great day.

Sarah Joyce

Last edited by mtclimber; Sep 18, 2009 at 3:28 PM.
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Old Sep 19, 2009, 11:04 AM   #353
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09/19/2009

Good Morning, Folks-

Yesterday, I awoke with thoughts of a previous discussion we had had in this thread. T brought up that discussion. It revolved around the importance of photography in recording, or capturing well the many memories of important family events.

Well, yesterday, September 18th was our 52nd Anniversary. So I tried to capture, in photos, how, yesterday as the very special day that it was for Bradley and I.

I began at breakfast. I wanted to capture a fitting, informal portrait of Bradley. I wanted my photo to capture Bradley’s strength and determination as he deals every day with some rather serious handicaps. I also wanted that photo to show a touch of his softness and empathy that we share together constantly.

The attached photo is a no flash, existing light informal photo that I believe nicely hit the target. That photo documented those qualities that I was hoping to capture very well.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Sep 19, 2009, 11:07 AM   #354
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Hi there, Folks-

Well, here is installment #2. If Bradley were to have an informal portrait to mark our 52nd Anniversary, then it was on;y proper, that my informal portrait was part and parcel of that celebration as well.

We did our workshop and lecture as scheduled. But it was far to busy to take time out for my informal portrait. Things finally, slowed down and relaxed, as we neared dinner time.

Bradley and I headed off to dinner, happy that we had once again shared another very busy day. I knew that the ship would have a small special cake to celebrate our anniversary, so I wanted to wanted to work out the camera settings before the cake arrived at our table during dessert time.

Bradley and I began as we do lots of times taking photos of each other, as we passed the camera back and forth between us. We took my informal portrait during that interlude of taking photos of each other and sharing a glass of wine before dinner was served.

So, attached is my informal portrait that Bradley took of me across the dinner table.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Sep 19, 2009, 11:10 AM   #355
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Hi there, once again, Folks-

I am back with installment #3 of recording or capturing in photos, our 52nd Anniversary. As will recall, Bradley and I passed the camera (the Sony A-230) across the dinner table as we took photos of each other.

Using that little exercise to pretty much tweak my camera settings, I was ready to hand off the camera, to our assistant waiter, Michelle, for a shot of the two of us at the dinner table. She has a Canon SX-10 camera, herself, so I knew that the size and the wait of the A-230 with the Sigma 18-125 mm lens mounted on it would not surprise her.

I had left the external flash in my bag, so it would not add any weight to the camera, and because all of the shots were done at 10 or 11 feet camera to subject. Therefore, I set up the camera to just use the camera’s built-in flash unit.

So here is that table photo attached to this post. It shows rather nicely that you can hand off your camera to somebody else and still capture a nice photo.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Sep 19, 2009, 11:12 AM   #356
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Hi there, once again, Folks-

Here is installment #4, for today. Here is a macro or close-up photo of our little Anniversary Cake that the ship prepared. A lot of people question how well a DSLR camera can take close-up shots.

Well here is a nice close-up of our cake. It was taken with the lens set to the 18 mm position, and the lens and camera combination had no problems at all focusing right up close. I also used the camera’s built-in flash, which I don’t often do, as I prefer natural lighting for close-ups. However, the result was quite pleasing.

The flash on the A-230 dampened nicely when I moved in close, and no exposure compensation was required at all.

Have a great day.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Sep 19, 2009, 11:17 AM   #357
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One more thought, Folks-

Perhaps this thread is nearing its end. I have noticed a measurable down turn in the number of postings from people who have been "regulars" with this thread.

So, if there is a continued lack of activity, i believe that the wise thing to do is to end this thread. This is your chance to chime in and let us know whether we should continue to end the thread.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Sep 19, 2009, 12:48 PM   #358
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This is the thread i keep coming back to...BTW did you see my pix of the Red Dog Saloon???

(its a good thread...and many thanks to you and JimC for all the info..I've learned soooo....MUCH..)

Happy anniversary...


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Originally Posted by mtclimber View Post
One more thought, Folks-

Perhaps this thread is nearing its end. I have noticed a measurable down turn in the number of postings from people who have been "regulars" with this thread.

So, if there is a continued lack of activity, i believe that the wise thing to do is to end this thread. This is your chance to chime in and let us know whether we should continue to end the thread.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Sep 19, 2009, 3:35 PM   #359
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mtclimber View Post
Kunai-

Welcome to the Forum and to this thread. JimC and I are attempting to pump as much learning material as possible into this thread. So I apologize that it may indeed become somewhat technical at times.

Concerning your camera choice: if your budget is limited, the Panasonic FZ-35 might be the better choice. The FZ-28 is virtually impossible to fine now. And in going to a DSLR camera, the best budget is the Sony A-230 camera. However, it seem that you are looking for more zoom power, that will require another lens beyond just the basic A-230 camera and the Kit (18-55 mm) lens. You will probably want to add the Sony 55-200 mm lens as well. The A-230 two lens kit is available at www.sonystyle.com and www.adorama.com for $579.99, but that may be beyond your budget, perhaps?

I was a long time Panasonic FZ-28 shooter and I can tell you from experience that ISO 800 is a good setting to use in low light level conditions because it give you the best low light capability while minimizing electronic noise.

The Sony A-230 is a huge improvement as it can very comfortably use ISO 1600 and still minimize the electronic noise due to its much physically larger imager. But as you might expect the camera is also physically larger and more expensive in price.

Have a great day.

Sarah Joyce
Thank you very much Mrs. Sarah.
I checked for FZ28 and Fz35. Both are not available in any of the stores here.
As i can understand from your reviews, A230 seems to be a really good camera. But my problem is I am not very comfortable in using viewfinder.
I am getting a better deal for 1000d. I know, its live is not good. But i like its image quality. So i will buy one tomorrow

Thank you once again for your advice.
Sorry I am little late. Happy anniversary !!!!

Kunal
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Old Sep 19, 2009, 5:01 PM   #360
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Kunai-

Congratulations on your camera selection. The Canon 1000D is an excellent camera. I am sure you will enjoy it a lot. Please post some photos and join in the fun on this thread. We deal with any kinds of camera.

Have a great day.

Sarah Joyce

Last edited by mtclimber; Sep 21, 2009 at 1:33 PM.
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