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Old Sep 19, 2009, 5:06 PM   #361
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Hi LittleJohn-

Thanks for your post. Yes, your photos brought back real memories of the Red Dog. We have extended this thread as an experiment. As long as there is enthusiasm and participation, we will keep it going.

It seemed to me like it had dropped off there for awhile. I am even paying cruise ship rates for an internet connection to keep adding something every day.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Sep 19, 2009, 7:38 PM   #362
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One more thought, Folks-

Perhaps this thread is nearing its end. I have noticed a measurable down turn in the number of postings from people who have been "regulars" with this thread.

So, if there is a continued lack of activity, i believe that the wise thing to do is to end this thread. This is your chance to chime in and let us know whether we should continue to end the thread.

Sarah Joyce
School has started and along with that are all the activities I need to take the pictures of!

So indeed I have not been on nearly as often. But I do miss you when I am gone and continue to come back every few days when I get a chance.

I am still making use of your advice. I now have the Sony H20 and love the quality as well as the small size. I am really not dissappointed in anything except the lack of a view finder. When trying to follow action the lcd delay keeps me from knowing if I am still pointed at the correct image. So, I often end up accidentally pointing up too high or down too low or other things like that.

I still have a few days to return the camera. Is there any thing else that would be worth considering or is this still the best deal to stay small but quality?
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Old Sep 19, 2009, 8:44 PM   #363
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Your personal Camera Check List:

Good Morning, Folks-

Our discussion this morning is about developing some good camera habits. Please keep in mind that your camera, be it a DSLR type camera, or a super zoom camera retains in memory some of the settings you last used. So, the first time you use your camera each day it is important to reset your camera for the the photo situation that you face next. Personally, I do it every time I pull the camera out of the camera bag. A simple one minute check can save the next photos that you want to take quite easily.

Here is what I quickly check, each time I reach for my camera:

ISO setting
WB or White Balance setting
EV or Exposure Compensation setting
Where the camera’s Mode Selector is set
Battery Status

Those five are the must items. You may also want to check:

Where the camera is set to focus
The Focusing Mode, such as Single, Continuous, Automatic and Predictive
The camera’s Metering Mode
If you are going to shoot any action photos, consider the shutter speed used by the camera.

If you get into that small and simple habit, it will save you from some missed, screwed-up, or scratch your head type photos. There are just 5 items that can be checked in less than 1 minute and I guarantee you, by checking those items, you will be more at peace, and a happy camper.

Have a great day.

Sarah Joyce
Sarah,

Good point!
In fact I had an example of this last night. The football players TP'd our house last night as part of football homecoming and my daughter wanted me to get a picture of it and I thought it would be a great test of the flash capabilities or low light capabilities of the Sony H20.

But the first few shots I could not get the flash to go. Then I finally tried to override and turn the flash on and it gave me an error message so that I finally realized what I was doing wrong. The camera was still set to continuous shoot or burst mode. The flash doesn't recover quickly enough for that so the camera waits for you to switch to single shot mode before it allows the flash to work.

I couldn't see outside near as well as the camera did once the flash lit up. Take a look. What do you think?
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Old Sep 19, 2009, 9:34 PM   #364
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I had a lot of feedback on my overexposed shots done previously. So I have tried again. This is cheerleading shots taken from the stands using the zoom to get closer. On the first shot I used most of the 10x zoom to get close up on my daughter. On other shots I kept the zoom out a little to see the other girls as well. Then in the photo editor on my PC I reduced the size to 25% of the original for all the shots to make them small enough for uploading. I then cropped in from there. Obviously the first shot need only a little cropping, the others a lot.

This was continuous shoot mode. No flash. I don't remember if I used iAuto or sports mode. I still don't know how you guys are seeing that on the pictures.
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Last edited by ritap; Sep 19, 2009 at 9:41 PM. Reason: enlarge the cropped pictures to see how much detail is lost
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Old Sep 20, 2009, 1:03 AM   #365
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On other shots I kept the zoom out a little to see the other girls as well. .
And the 'butt shots' of the boys in the top photo??

LOL..actually those are pretty good shots.

as for photo info..I usually 'right click' on the photo image that I've loaded in my computer, then I click on 'properties'

To look at photo info here..I use Exif reader within 'firefox'.. (I googled it to download)
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Old Sep 20, 2009, 9:48 AM   #366
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From what I've seen (here and in other forums), the H20 is a good camera and produces great quality images up to 5x or 6x zoom. Once you pass that, then softness kicks in and resolution goes down the drain. The images are still usable but far from being great. I'd go for the FZ35 for image quality but that's a much larger camera. Your next option would be the Fuji f70EXR (also a 10x zoom small camera, which seems to be very capable). That's my 2c.
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Old Sep 20, 2009, 1:15 PM   #367
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Rita-

Your H-20 photos really look good. Please keep in mind that there is no so called "perfect" camera out there. There will always be some necessary compromises. Hence you have to put up with no optical viewfinder on the H-20, but the photo or image quality is very good and the flash has great range. You "TP'ed" photos show that quite well.

The Panasonic FZ-35 is another good camera, but it is almost twice as large (in terms of physical dimensions), and it costs roughly 50% more. That could make it a non viable choice for you.

The Kodak Z-1012 is still available on E-Bay at around +/_ $200 and it does have an electronic viewfinder, but it is physically larger, and it has less flash range.

I hope that info helps.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Sep 20, 2009, 1:34 PM   #368
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Default Using ISO 3200 on the Sony A-230 Camera

09/20/2009

Good Morning, Folks-

Well, last night I decided to “push the envelope” with the Sony A-230 camera at last evening’s entertainment. I started using ISO 1600. I quickly found out once more, that the lighting made a custom WB necessary. I got that set easily. The photos looked very good when viewed on the LCD screen. So, I decided to see what ISO 3200 looked like. The photos looked amazingly good.

Yes, there was some visible noise, so I ran this photo through a new noise elimination/filter program called Photo Studio 6.0 by ArcSoft, and the attached photo cleaned up beautifully.

So, attached you can see my first ISO 3200 photo sample. All in all, I am honestly very impressed with what the Sony A-230 DSLR camera can do. It is very impressive camera performance for the an entry level DSLR camera.

We hope that you are enjoying a great day.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Sep 20, 2009, 1:37 PM   #369
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Default Shooting into Backlighting Conditions

Hi there, Folks-

This discussion will focus on overcoming back lighting conditions. In contrast to the decades old Kodak rule to always have the sun behind you and coming over your shoulder into your photo environment, there are indeed times when you will have to be shooting into an exactly opposite situation. That situation is called backlighting. It is a situation where where the light for your photo is coming directly at the Photographer from the rear of the photo environment.

So this morning, I set up a very good example for you, so you can see two things: (1) Exactly how backlighting affects your photo. (2) How to overcome the negative effects of backlighting, so that you can capture a normalized photo.

The photo sample attached to this post demonstrates how a photo taken into backlighting really looks. It is not pretty. In the next post, I will demonstrate the technique used to overcoming backlighting.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Sep 20, 2009, 1:40 PM   #370
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Default "Front Lighting" Your Back Lighted Photo

Hi there, Folks-

Well, you have seen the problems with taking your photo in a backlighting situation. In this post we will show you how to overcome those negative effects of photographing in a real backlighting situation.

The rule of thumb is simply this: If you have have substantial back lighting, you have to provide front lighting in your photo to overcome the negative effect of backlighting.

The logical question is this: How do I provide this so called “front lighting?” In this case you light the front of your photo with an external flash. That is exactly what we did to obtain the photo attached to this post.

Generally speaking, backlighting is “problem” lighting. So our purpose here is to teach you how to identify a backlighting situation. Then we want to share with you how to overcome the negative effects of backlighting.

Sarah Joyce
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