Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > What Camera Should I Buy?

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Aug 31, 2009, 6:16 PM   #31
Senior Member
 
mtclimber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Oregon, USA
Posts: 18,143
Default

T-

Based on the many photo situations posed earlier in this thread, in fact there were 12 of them, all revolving around children growing-up and their activities, the Canon XS is the only camera that could hand all twelve of those photo situations.

That makes the Canon XS a very versitile camera. as far as lenses go I see that there are two options:

(1) The Canon XS camera with the 18-55mmIS lens ($500), plus the Canon 55-250mm IS telephoto lens ($210.00). Those two lenses give you coverage equal to a 14.3X super zoom camera. But now you have full image stabilization and a great DSLR that can take photos with ease when set to ISO 800 or 1600. The Canon SX-10 goes to pot with ISO settings of more than ISO 250. The Nikon P-90 goes to pot with any ISO setting above ISO 400.

You might want to go back and re-read that long post that I wrote earlier in the thread about where super zoom cameras go wrong, and they can not handle a lot of photo situations. Only as DSLR with its 15 to 20 times larger imager can handle those 12 photo situations.

(2) Yes, the second option. A lot of folks do not like to change lenses. For those people I suggest the Tamaron 18-200mm lens to go along with the Canon XS and the kit lens. The cost is just about exactly the same as option #1. However, you must keep in mind that that Tamron lens is good but not very bright nor does it have IS. But for the folks that don't like to make lens changes, it gives them, in 35mm terms from 28mm to 320mm or 11.4X optical zoom all in one lens.

But at the end of the day, T, the choice is entirely up to you. And believe me, T, as you begin to learn more and more about photography, your photos will naturally get much better.

Everyone of us will be here in this Forum to help you and guide you along the way.

Have a great day.

Sarah Joyce
mtclimber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 31, 2009, 11:02 PM   #32
Senior Member
 
Tullio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 7,370
Default

The Canon sensor has a cropping factor of 1.5x. This means an 18-200mm lens is in reality 27-300mm, which is not bad both in terms of WA and long zoom.
__________________

Tullio
Tullio is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 31, 2009, 11:34 PM   #33
Senior Member
 
mtclimber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Oregon, USA
Posts: 18,143
Default

Actually Tullio-

It is 1.6 as the crop factor.

Sarah Joyce
mtclimber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 1, 2009, 12:45 AM   #34
Senior Member
 
Tullio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 7,370
Default

Thanks for the correction, Sarah. I can't keep track of all the different crop factors.
__________________

Tullio
Tullio is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 1, 2009, 9:50 AM   #35
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Kansas
Posts: 49
Default

I found a canon xs package w/ 18-55 mm IS lens plus a Tamron 70-300 mm Di LD macro Lens and spare battery, 4 GB card and Bag for 659.95. I also found basically the same package but instead of the Tamron lens it has a Canon 75-300mm III Lensa at 759.95. Good deals? Which do you think is best?
Thanks,
t
tcn1991 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 1, 2009, 10:30 AM   #36
Senior Member
 
mtclimber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Oregon, USA
Posts: 18,143
Default

T-

The first offer is the better package and price. The second package with the Canon 75-300mm lens is not as good because that happens to be one of Canon's least desirable lenses. Who is making the first offer? Are they reliable. I hope they are not on E-bay or black listed in the reseller rating.

Have a great day.

Sarah Joyce
mtclimber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 1, 2009, 2:42 PM   #37
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Kansas
Posts: 49
Default

Sarah,
I am just going to send you a personal message if I can figure it out!!!
thanks,
t
tcn1991 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 1, 2009, 7:05 PM   #38
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Illinois, Far Northwest Chicago Suburbs
Posts: 33
Default

Sarah,
Just letting you know that I inserted a reply into this thread with similar needs as t's and may have confused the issue for you as t is not the one that gave 12 shooting situations. I am. Sorry, t.
Rita
ritap is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 1, 2009, 7:11 PM   #39
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Illinois, Far Northwest Chicago Suburbs
Posts: 33
Default

Sarah,
I have seen you mention the Sony H20 in several threads. But I did not find a review in Steve's reviews. To compare the Sony H20 to the other super zooms... do you prefer the shorter zoom to stay more within the range of the flash or what are the issues? I have seen several reviews that rave about the Panasonic fz28 (soon to be replaced by fz35) for instance and of course there is the Sony Hx1 with longer zoom than the H20. I could not find either of the Sony's in Steves reviews. Could you enlighten me a little in this area?
Rita
ritap is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 1, 2009, 7:33 PM   #40
Senior Member
 
mtclimber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Oregon, USA
Posts: 18,143
Default

Rita-

I did a test cycle on the Sony HX-1 in May and to tell you the truth, it was a quirky camera and something of a disappointment. There is however, a positive note. The development of the Sony WX-1 proves that the CMOS imager has a lot of potential. So my conclusion was that I will await the HX-2 camera.

I don't believe that you can find a Panasonic FZ-28 anywhere, any more. It was a great camera. Therefore, I would expect that the Panasonic FZ-35/38 to be equally excellent.

The bottom line analysis of the 12 photo situations posed in this thread, is simply this: A super zoom cannot handle all 12 of those well defined photo situations. Realistically, those 12 photo situations require a DSLR camera and an operator behind that camera that really understand and employ some real photo craft skills.

It is the old fully automatic shooting mode versus some skillful employment of photo craft argument. To be very honest with you, a person who desires to shoot in the fully automatic mode would not be able to bring photos away from those 12 photo situations that you would be proud of, and happily able to share with family and friends.

And that brings us to the Sony H-20 camera. I post about the Sony H-20 camera because it is without a doubt, the most user friendly camera on the market today. No, Steve has not done a Sony H-20 review, but other reviews are available out there, and they are pretty darned good.

Yes, the H-20 has just 10X optical zoom. But really let's be serious here, how much zoom do you really need? The H-20 camera has an excellent flash range, and that is one of its strongest points. For a camera operating in the fully automatic mode (and we are receiving that request more and more here in the Forum), the H-20 is a top notch performer.

So tell us please where you find yourself?? Do you want to stay with a point and shoot super zoom or are you considering move toward a DSLR camera?

I hope you are having a great day.

Sarah Joyce
mtclimber is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:34 AM.