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Old Oct 15, 2009, 11:37 AM   #481
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So, are there any P&S cameras that don't have a problem with shutter lag, or is a dSLR the only way to get around that? (I hope this question fits with the discussion of this thread!)
In all of our discussions about the SLRs, I realize I keep coming back to needing something that is quick & easy in addition to a "great" camera. If it is too big, I will have to keep it in a closet, and it's not readily accessible then (I am short, so that's a factor! LOL). I currently keep my P&S in my computer cabinet by my purse, and it gets used (and not left behind because it is in my face)....so I need something that will fit there

You ARE going to need two cameras, no doubt. I've concluded that too.
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Old Oct 15, 2009, 2:14 PM   #482
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javacleve-

Yes there are point and shoot cameras with little to no shutter lag. Generally speaking, point and shoot cameras produced or manufactured in the last 2 years, priced at $150.00 or more have little to no shutter lag.

The Panasonic FZ-28/35, the Sony H-20/50, and the Canon G-10/11/ and the S-90 are good examples.

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Old Oct 15, 2009, 2:24 PM   #483
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Thank you, Sarah...so maybe I should go with a good P&S like the S90 to replace my current P&S, and get a better lens for my Nikon N80 for telephoto/sports situations (if it exists, that is). Just everything I had read seemed to indicate that a dSLR was the only way to get rid of the shutter lag, and that was a HUGE reason for me wanting a dSLR. It wasn't the ONLY reason--I know there are many good points to the dSLR, also...but I keep coming back to, will I use it? Given that I already have an SLR (albeit film, not digital), do I really need another one?
If I could get an SLR that was reasonably compact (and therefore I was able to use it) along with the other advantages, then I definitely want the SLR. So, I need to do some testing yet.
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Old Oct 15, 2009, 2:25 PM   #484
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javacleve-

Yes there are point and shoot cameras with little to no shutter lag. Generally speaking, point and shoot cameras produced or manufactured in the last 2 years, priced at $150.00 or more have little to no shutter lag.
I think this is a bit misleading. It is because it doesn't consider focus performance or shot to shot time.
For example, here's the comments from the dpreview review of the G10:
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The focus performance of the G10 in good lighting conditions, is quite acceptable. It focuses faster at wider angles than it does at telephoto zoom settings. In low light or in macro mode, the G10 is quite slow, and even with the focus assist lamp activated, it can have problems focusing at all in very low light (but this is the same with almost all compacts). Shutter lag with LCD live view activated is not too bad, but we are still far from DSLR territory, and this is certainly not a camera to use if you want to capture the decisive moment
shot to shot time without flash is measured at 2 full seconds.
shot to shot time with flash is measured at 2.5 seconds.
Power on to first shot taken = 1.8 seconds.

Bottom line - it's gotten better. But by no means are we at the place you were with your SLR or with today' DSLRs. The telling sentance:
Quote:
Shutter lag with LCD live view activated is not too bad, but we are still far from DSLR territory
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Old Oct 15, 2009, 2:28 PM   #485
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OK, John G, that's more along what I keep reading too. I guess the thing is that it's all relative, so if a reviewer says the S90 has "little" lag, that's in comparison to other P&S's, not to dSLRs...
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Old Oct 15, 2009, 2:38 PM   #486
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Javacleve-

That is correct. Point and shoot cameras have gotten better, but their shutter lag is always relative to other point and shoot cameras. DSLR cameras will always be better.

The smallest and most compact DSLR cameras are very easy to identify. They are the Canon XT, the XTi, and the XS. The Pentax K-2000, and the KX, The Olympus E-410, the E-420, and the E-620.

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Old Oct 16, 2009, 12:45 AM   #487
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Is there a disadvantage to the E-620? That you folks have noticed?
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Old Oct 16, 2009, 11:22 AM   #488
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Good Morning, littlejohn-

I like the Olympus E-620 a lot. However, you will see a bit of limits caused by the smaller imager and some high ISO limitations, when compared to cameras like the Canon XSi and even the Pentax K-2000 or KX.

Have a great day.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Oct 16, 2009, 12:27 PM   #489
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The smallest and most compact DSLR cameras are very easy to identify. They are the Canon XT, the XTi, and the XS. The Pentax K-2000, and the KX, The Olympus E-410, the E-420, and the E-620.

Sarah Joyce
They are not the smallest anymore, Sarah. The Panasonic GF1 and Olympus EP-1 are currently the two smallest DSLR available and I believe the Pana G1 and GH1 are also smaller than any of the models listed (oh wait, some people may not consider those models to be DSLRs since they have no mirror). So, if we are going to be hung on technicality, then never mind my comment!
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Old Oct 17, 2009, 9:56 AM   #490
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I think this is a bit misleading. It is because it doesn't consider focus performance or shot to shot time.
For example, here's the comments from the dpreview review of the G10:

shot to shot time without flash is measured at 2 full seconds.
shot to shot time with flash is measured at 2.5 seconds.
Power on to first shot taken = 1.8 seconds.

Bottom line - it's gotten better. But by no means are we at the place you were with your SLR or with today' DSLRs. The telling sentance:
I'm reading this again, and I have a question: when I say "shutter lag," I mean the time between pressing the shutter and the photo actually being taken. Not so much the shot to shot time (if that makes sense)? That may be another issue, as you might want to shoot another one quickly. But what is MORE frustrating to me is "ooh she's smiling, click...." 2 seconds later (it feels like), the shutter finally goes off and she has turned away from the camera already....

if there is another term for that, please let me know, because there seems to be a different meaning to "shutter lag??"
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