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Old Oct 17, 2009, 10:38 AM   #491
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I'm reading this again, and I have a question: when I say "shutter lag," I mean the time between pressing the shutter and the photo actually being taken. Not so much the shot to shot time (if that makes sense)?
I'm not sure that makes sense. Let's look at it from a mechanical perspective. Assuming you have half-pressed the shutter to pre-focus the shot, once you press the shutter release button, the diaphragm opens up, light goes in and the image gets "recorded" (for lack of a better word) on the sensor. The camera then performs a conversion of that image to JPEG and finally records the final results into the memory card and once that's done, you can then take another picture. Now, which part of this process you wish to use as a definition of shutter lag? I'd say the entire process because in reality, when your daughter smiles and you press the shutter, the image is taken, whether you see it immediately on the LCD or not. The two full seconds is the time that the entire process takes. So, the longer this time, the more chances you have to miss that second photo opportunity. That is shot to shot time. I think you are confused with burst mode, in which the camera keeps taking one picture after another as long as you keep your finger pressing the shutter. Those are two different things.
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Old Oct 17, 2009, 11:07 AM   #492
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I'm not sure that makes sense. Let's look at it from a mechanical perspective. Assuming you have half-pressed the shutter to pre-focus the shot, once you press the shutter release button, the diaphragm opens up, light goes in and the image gets "recorded" (for lack of a better word) on the sensor. The camera then performs a conversion of that image to JPEG and finally records the final results into the memory card and once that's done, you can then take another picture. Now, which part of this process you wish to use as a definition of shutter lag? I'd say the entire process because in reality, when your daughter smiles and you press the shutter, the image is taken, whether you see it immediately on the LCD or not. The two full seconds is the time that the entire process takes. So, the longer this time, the more chances you have to miss that second photo opportunity. That is shot to shot time. I think you are confused with burst mode, in which the camera keeps taking one picture after another as long as you keep your finger pressing the shutter. Those are two different things.
Actually, that's not true. The shutter lag is the delay between when the shuter button is fully depressed and when the camera records the image. The delay can be a result of several things, only one of which would be whether the camera has completed processing the prior image. Even though you fully depress the shutter button, the camera still locks the shutter until it has confirmed the focus and the exposure.

DSLRs have much faster processors in them, so shutter lag is much less (though not always zero,) but P&S digicams have as much work to do and are less capable of doing it in a timely fashion.

What javacleve is describing is "shutter lag".
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Old Oct 17, 2009, 11:12 AM   #493
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Actually, that's not true. The shutter lag is the delay between when the shuter button is fully depressed and when the camera records the image.
Isn't that what I said?
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Old Oct 17, 2009, 11:19 AM   #494
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Isn't that what I said?
No. Shutter lag has nothing to do with the processing that happens after you take the shot. Shutter lag is a result of the processing that must happen between when you fully depress the shutter button and when the camera gets around to taking the shot.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shutter_lag
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Old Oct 17, 2009, 8:31 PM   #495
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OK TCav, let's take this step by step. What do you actually mean by "the camera takes the shot"? Next, when the camera records the image, we are talking on the memory card, correct?
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Old Oct 17, 2009, 10:03 PM   #496
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The point is, that John G responded to Sarah's comment about newer digicams having little "shutter lag" by describing shot to shot time...while that is also a concern (as you are pointing out, Tullio), that isn't exactly what I was asking about. I am asking about ONE shot, the camera is ready, so it's not about the previous shot still being processed...you press the shutter to take the picture and it does not actually record the image until some time later (feels like forever to me, probably more like a second LOL), and by then the person has moved or whatever. THAT'S what really bothers me (more so than missing the NEXT shot).
You cannot always be prefocused and holding the shutter halfway down, so I am talking about a full shutter press.
I have used other people's digicams and know that my Nikon is much worse than theirs;
So, I'll ask again, with this description: are there any P&S cameras for which that isn't an issue?
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Old Oct 17, 2009, 10:05 PM   #497
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I'm not sure that makes sense. Let's look at it from a mechanical perspective. Assuming you have half-pressed the shutter to pre-focus the shot, once you press the shutter release button, the diaphragm opens up, light goes in and the image gets "recorded" (for lack of a better word) on the sensor. The camera then performs a conversion of that image to JPEG and finally records the final results into the memory card and once that's done, you can then take another picture. Now, which part of this process you wish to use as a definition of shutter lag? I'd say the entire process because in reality, when your daughter smiles and you press the shutter, the image is taken, whether you see it immediately on the LCD or not. The two full seconds is the time that the entire process takes. So, the longer this time, the more chances you have to miss that second photo opportunity. That is shot to shot time. I think you are confused with burst mode, in which the camera keeps taking one picture after another as long as you keep your finger pressing the shutter. Those are two different things.
You're talking about missing the SECOND photo opportunity--I'm talking about missing the FIRST photo! I'm not talking about burst mode at all.
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Old Oct 18, 2009, 12:33 AM   #498
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OK TCav, let's take this step by step. What do you actually mean by "the camera takes the shot"? Next, when the camera records the image, we are talking on the memory card, correct?
Shutter lag is the time between when you fully depress the shutter button (Step 1) and when the camera starts to record the image (Step 2). It has nothing to do with the memory card. Pressing the shutter button halfway down so the camera will lock focus and exposure reduces shutter lag, but it doesn't eliminate it entirely.
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Old Oct 18, 2009, 3:56 AM   #499
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Tullio....you have a Sony...you won't experience what the others call 'shuttle Lag'..it just isn't in the Sony vocabulary
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Old Oct 19, 2009, 10:32 PM   #500
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Tullio....you have a Sony...you won't experience what the others call 'shuttle Lag'..it just isn't in the Sony vocabulary
so, does that mean that a Sony P&S has little to no shutter lag, like Sarah said?
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