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Old Sep 3, 2009, 10:35 AM   #71
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kevincop-

The debate of the super zoom versus the entry level DSLR seems to keep raging without any end in sight. Be it the Canon XS or the Sony A-230 camera, you can easily get by with just two lenses: the kit lens and the 55-200mm lens in either brand.

Beyond the lenses you may indeed want to add an external flash at a later date. But when you consider that the price point on the super zoom and the entry level DSLR camera are getting closer and closer all the time, it makes you re-think your decision. For me, the fact that I can do so much more with the DSLR camera is making the decision both easy and obvious.

Keep in mind that a DSLR choice is not just a camera choice, it is a system choice that is rather important. You may change camera bodies at a later date, but you will keep the lenses to go with the new body that you purchase.

Have a great day.

Sarah Joyce

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Old Sep 3, 2009, 11:08 AM   #72
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Originally Posted by Tullio View Post
IMO, the zoomed images lack resolution and details. That makes me wonder how good that lens really is. I know the camera is capable of taking great pictures at shorter FL but I'm some what disappointed with its long zoom performance.
You're going to have a very shallow DOF zoomed in that much with a head shot. Heck, even with a kit lens at f/5.6 or so with that type of framing, it's not uncommon to see one eye in focus and the other starting to get soft if you shoot from an angle.

So, depending on the AF point (bridge of nose, nose itself, one of the eyes, etc.), you're going to start seeing softer details as you get away from it (forehead versus nose, etc.). You'd really need to zoom in a bit less to show what the lens is capable of unless you are very carefully using spot focus on exactly the same spot with both cameras and showing that spot in crops. ;-)
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Old Sep 3, 2009, 11:14 AM   #73
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Default Short Range (30 inches) Flash Test

Today we will move into some side by side comparisons. In this comparison, we used the camera's built in flash unit at close range to determine if each camera would automatically dampen or reduce the intensity of the built-in flash to get the proper exposure.

In this side by side comparison you will see that both cameras successfully and properly dampened or reduced the flash.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Sep 3, 2009, 12:23 PM   #74
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Does the Sony accept any lens or do you have a to buy certain lenses for it? The photos of you, close up were pretty comparable. Off to the side of you forehead above your eye the Sony seemed to keep the sharpness better than did the Canon. However I understand that the Sony doesn't have live view. If I understand correctly that is when the lcd screen shows what you are about to shoot? If so, I do like the live view feature. I'm here just taking it all in.
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Old Sep 3, 2009, 12:42 PM   #75
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Good Morning T-

Well, were happy that you are taking all of this information into consideration. That was the reason I began this thread.

The Sony A-230 can only use lens that have the standardized KM/Sony mount. Any of the older Konica Minolta lenses fit the Sony DSLR cameras perfectly. In addition, third party lens makers like: Sigma, Tamron, and Tokina also produce their lenses in the KM/Sony mount.

The Sony A-200 series cameras do not the "live view" feature. However, the Sony A-300 cameras do indeed feature "live view." In the professional reviews, most reviewers acknowledge the Sony most probably has the very best "live view" implementation. I hope that helps. We always welcome your questions.

Have a great day.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Sep 3, 2009, 12:47 PM   #76
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Default No Flash Photos at ISO 800

Here is another side by side photo comparison between the Canon XS and the Sony A-230 cameras.

This time we are comparing no flash photos taken at an ISO setting of ISO 800. In this side by side comparison it is easy to see that both of these cameras produce better image quality that could be obtained by a point and shoot super zoom set to the same ISO 800 setting.

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Old Sep 3, 2009, 12:50 PM   #77
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You can use any lens in Minolta Autofocus Mount (a.k.a., Maxxum, Dynax, Alpha, Minolta A Mount). There are many lens choices available. Here are some incomplete lists of lenses that have been manufactured in this mount.

Fixed Focal Length Lenses in Minolta A mount

Macro Lenses in Minolta A Mount

Zoom Lenses in Minolta A mount

The Sony A330, A380, A500 and A550 all have Live View if that's a feature you're interested in. Ditto for the older A300 and A350. All of these bodies have sensor shift type stabilization built in, too (so any lens you use on them will benefit from that feature, without the need to buy stabilized lenses).
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Old Sep 3, 2009, 1:14 PM   #78
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Is the sensor shift type stabilization what is otherwise referred to as image stabilization?
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Old Sep 3, 2009, 1:14 PM   #79
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Folks-

Perhaps some of the technical terms we are using might be a bit confusing. So I have prepared a little review on ISO speeds, F-stop, and how any change in aperture will affect your shutter speed, as your camera will automatically make a shutter speed change when the aperture position change to maintain proper exposure.

Regarding ISO settings: As the ISO setting numerically increases, your camera increases its sensitivity to light. Thus, in a low light level environment where there is a lot less light, you would select ISO 800 or ISO 1600 to take your photo in the greatly reduced light.

Regarding F Stops: The smallest F stop number, such as F 2.0, indicates that your camera's aperture is wide open, admitting the most light. Conversely, as the F stop number numerically increases, it indicates the the aperture is closing , and will therefore admit less light. If I say the I decreased the F stop from F 8 to F 11, I have closed the camera's aperture, less light will be admited.

How Shutter Speed is affected by Aperture Changes:
When your camera's aperture is opened up, such as moving the aperture from F 4.0 to F3.5, more light is admitted for your photo so the shutter speed will automatically increase to maintain the proper exposure. Conversely, when the camera's aperture is closed down moving from F 8 to F 11, less light is admitted, thus to maintain the proper exposure the camera will select a slower shutter speed.

As always, we are happy to handle any and all questions you might have.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Sep 3, 2009, 1:30 PM   #80
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Is the sensor shift type stabilization what is otherwise referred to as image stabilization?
Yes, it's a form of image stabilization, pioneered by Minolta, starting with the Minolta DiMAGE A1. If you want to see more about it, start with that camera (and all Konica Minolta and Sony dSLR models have stabilization built in, using the same technology pioneered by the Minolta DiMAGE A1).

Note that Minolta merged with Konica to form Konica Minolta, and Sony later purchased Konica Minolta's camera related assets, building upon the technology pioneered by Minolta with Sony dSLR models. Here's a link to Steve's Minolta DiMAGE A1 review (the first camera to use sensor shift stabilization):

http://www.steves-digicams.com/camer...a1-review.html

Instead of moving optical elements inside of a lens as done in Nikkor VR (Vibration Reduction) or Canon IS (Image Stabilization) lenses, cameras with sensor based stablization move the camera's main imaging sensor in response to vibration introduced by camera shake. That allows it to work with any lens you mount on the camera, without the need to buy lenses with stabilization built in.

Since Minolta introduced this technology, it's shown up in other manufacturers' models, too (for example, a number of Pentax and Olympus dSLR models are using stabilization techniques based on moving the camera's imaging sensor to compensate for camera shake.
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