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Old Sep 3, 2009, 1:47 PM   #81
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Thanks a lot, JimC-

That is an excellent explanation of sensor shift image stabilization. If somebody anticipates a good amount of low light level environment shooting, IMO, IS is a necessity due to the slow shutter speeds that can be encountered in that style of shooting.

That naturally raises the question: Is in lens IS better than in camera body IS? Actually they are about the same. The difference at least to me is that when you pay for it in the camera body, you pay just once. If you opt for in lens IS, you have to pay for the IS over and over again, as you pay more for a lens with IS and one without IS.

For me, and I have used both, in the camera body sensor stabilization will save money in the long term, and you can purchase older used lenses, such as the KM lenses with peace of mind because when you mount them on your Sony, Olympus, or Pentax DSLR cameras that have image sensor IS, those older lens will enjoy the benefit of in camera body IS.

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Old Sep 3, 2009, 2:13 PM   #82
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Let's assume that I dive into a dslr and love it and want to grow with it - are both the canon and sony cameras that would grow further after I get things figured out? Will I have to turn around a purchase another camera in the next couple of years? Which camera would take me further? If I plan to grow should I be considering a higher level entry camera - xsi or a380?
Thanks,
t
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Old Sep 3, 2009, 2:22 PM   #83
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I'd look at the A500 as the best "next step up" in the Sony lineup. You don't gain much except for Live View and a higher resolution sensor with the A380 (with a smaller viewfinder due to a separate Live View sensor, and more noise at higher ISO speeds with a 14MP sensor over a 10MP sensor in that particular case).

The A500 has a much better Sony 12MP CMOS Sensor (as used by models like the Nikon D5000, Nikon D90, Nikon D300 and Sony A700), if you need better performance at higher ISO speeds. It's a more expensive model though (body only price of $749.99 for the A500).

http://www.sonystyle.com/webapp/wcs/...9&N=4294966273

In the Canon lineup, you don't get ISO 3200 until you go to the T1i. The XS and XSi are limited to a maximum ISO speed of 1600 (whereas all current Sony dSLR models have a higher ISO speed setting of at least ISO 3200, including the Sony A230).

In the Sony or Nikon dSLR lineups in models with an APS-C size sensor, the Sony 12MP CMOS sensor is the way to go if you want the best performance at higher ISO speed settings (in addition to the new Sony A500, the Nikon D5000, Nikon D90, Nikon D300 and Sony A700 all use a Sony 12MP CMOS Sensor). The Nikon D40 uses a Sony 6MP CCD Sensor. The Nikon D40x, D60 and D3000; as well as the Sony A200, A230, A300 and A330 use a Sony 10MP CCD Sensor (as do some of the Pentax 10MP dSLR models). In the Canon Lineup, I'd move to the T1i if you need better performance in that area (in the current Canon dSLR lineup, the T1i the least expensive model with ISO speeds higher than ISO 1600).
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Old Sep 3, 2009, 2:44 PM   #84
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gerrydee View Post
All I will say, is how far you have taken this thread from "what point and shoot should I buy" into a full blown lesson and techniques on DSLR's.
The OP is obviously interested, based on the questions being asked. So, I'm inclined to allow this discussion unless the OP chooses otherwise.
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Old Sep 3, 2009, 2:55 PM   #85
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimC View Post
The OP is obviously interested, based on the questions being asked. So, I'm inclined to allow this discussion unless the OP chooses otherwise.

Agreed
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Old Sep 3, 2009, 3:13 PM   #86
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You also need to keep in mind that the OP's original requirements (for example, indoor sports, plays, etc.) pointed towards a dSLR model as the best fit. You can always buy more lenses to fit in better with more shooting conditions later with a dSLR model, whereas a point and shoot solution limits you to the lens that came attached to the camera. Also, with a dSLR model, your lenses become more of an investment (you can upgrade the body later and take most lenses with you within a given camera manufacturer).
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Old Sep 3, 2009, 3:15 PM   #87
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tcn1991 View Post
Let's assume that I dive into a dslr and love it and want to grow with it - are both the canon and sony cameras that would grow further after I get things figured out? Will I have to turn around a purchase another camera in the next couple of years? Which camera would take me further? If I plan to grow should I be considering a higher level entry camera - xsi or a380?
Thanks,
t

Super question.....

BTW all I am finding this thread the most valuable one I`ve read....its natural flow is perfect for my decision making....(good call Jim)

Sarah, I opened 3 windows last night. One with you in the Sony A 230 shot, the other in the Canon and the last in the H20

My read is that the Sony A was a tad better...but I was surprised at how the H20 compared. My question to all now is...

Is that surprising to you? By that I mean are the shots considered to be simple enough that most cameras can take?

I also wonder if it would be helpful and interesting to both the OP, & myself (as well as others) to see shots of varying difficulty between all 3 cameras. My reasoning is (I can be corrected) is that we are both at the decision point where we are deciding between a super zoom and a DSLR.

Now LOL...I know some one has to do the 'work' and I appreciate that and understand if it doesn't happen.....
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Old Sep 3, 2009, 3:35 PM   #88
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Hi there, littlejohn-

Thanks for your kind words. Yes, as we set up the comparison shots with the Sony A-230, and the Canon XS DSLR cameras, we can easily include a photo taken with the Sony H-20 as well. The Sony H-20 has excellent image quality, and operate very well in a fully automatic mode, that is why I have been talking about the H-20 in the Forum.

The head and shoulders photo of myself was fairly simple and uncomplicated. So I would expect there to be some similarity in image quality, when looking at the photos from those three different cameras.

As we head through this weekend setting up photo we (my husband and I) will attempt to give you a wide variety of photo environments.

Have a great day.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Sep 3, 2009, 3:36 PM   #89
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For JimC-

How does the Minolta MD mount differ from the A mount? Thanks!

Sarah Joyce
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Old Sep 3, 2009, 3:42 PM   #90
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They are totally different lens mounts (the older MC/MD mount lenses are manual focus and use a different physical mount).

Minolta switched from the MC/MD mount 24 years ago in 1985 with the launch of the Maxxum 7000, and a new line of Autofocus Lenses using a new Minolta Autofocus Lens mount (a.k.a., Minolta A, Maxxum, Dynax, Alpha mount). See some of the pages about it at mir.com for more details. Following Minolta's example, Canon climbed aboard this approach later by dropping their older FD manual focus lens mount and switching to a newer EF Autofocus lens mount (probably because Minolta was taking away market share after launching their Autofocus cameras and lenses). Here's a quote about how Minolta helped to pioneer Autofocus technology in modern SLR camera systems by bravely switching to a newer AF (Autofocus) lens mount, which is also being used by Konica Minolta and Sony dSLR models:

Quote:
...However, a relatively low profile Minolta rocked the entire photographic community in January 1985 with a new breed of AF camera which has a revolutionary concept that made it differed from other "mainstream industrial design" adopted by other makers. "New" because there were two major factors of which one of them has a great impact to the existing Minolta users - the Company decided to drop support for the older MC/MD mount and replaced with an fully electronic lens mount with no backward compatibility.

But a more important element is, the Maxxum 7000 AF SLR camera was the first true system AF SLR with an body integrated AF design with a host of new AF lenses built around the camera.
http://www.mir.com.my/rb/photography...um7k/index.htm

You can find adapters that let you mount older MC/MD mount lenses to Konica Minolta or Sony dSLR bodies. You'd need to set the aperture on the lens to the desired setting, and change a camera setting to let the camera fire without a lens attached using manual exposure with most models (since there won't be any communication via the electronic lens mount contacts, as the older manual focus lenses didn't use that method of communication). But, you can get them to work that way (the camera won't know what aperture you've got it set to, but the meter will still work). Just use Manual Exposure (or Aperture Priority with some models that support that mode without a recognizable lens attached, like the Sony A700), setting the aperture on the lens itself.

You may find this thread over at Dyxum to be of use. For example, this "sticky" type thread has information on some of the MC/MD to Maxxum adapters available (scroll down past the teleconverters section and you'll see a section on adapters for Manual Focus lenses):

http://www.dyxum.com/dforum/forum_posts.asp?TID=2100

One issue with some adapters is the ability to focus to infinity. So, you'll find optical elements in some, with varying degrees of magnification (1.1x, 1.2x, 1.3x, etc.) to try and allow focus to infinity.

Minolta's MC/MD lens to Maxxum body adapter was a 2x (equivalent to using a 2x Teleconverter). But, most third party adapters don't use that much magnification.

But, your best bet with a Sony dSLR model is to stick with Minolta Autofocus mount lenses, so that you'd have Autofocus and no need to use an adapter.
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