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Old Sep 7, 2009, 2:58 PM   #21
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Or new Macro lens

Well then it seems that I'll just use my P&S for Macro. It can focus as close as 3".
I would never go by focus distance when comparing macro ability.

For one thing, if you need to focus that close to "fill the frame" enough with your subject, you're going to have issues with the camera blocking the light, casting shadows, spooking smaller subjects and more.

For example, would it not be better to focus from 12 inches away and fill the frame with a small subject, versus needing to focus from 3 inches away to fill the frame with that same subject (so that the subject occupies the same percentage of the frame).

Macro lenses are rated by magnification. For example, a 1:1 Macro lens allows you to fill the frame with a subject the same size as the camera's film or sensor at it's closest focus distance. A 1:2 Macro lens means that you can fill the frame with a subject twice as large as the camera's film or sensor size. A 1:4 Macro Lens (the rating you'll find with most kit lenses included with a dSLR model) allows you to fill the frame with a subject 4 times the size of the camera's film or sensor. IOW, for something like a flower, a kit lens will probably work fine. If you want to fill the frame with a small insect, then a dedicated 1:1 macro lens is a better bet (and a longer focal length lens that allows you to focus from further away to fill the frame with the same subject size is usually preferred, since it makes it much easier to get the desired lighting and more).
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Old Sep 7, 2009, 3:09 PM   #22
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The A230 was announced in May 2009 (and didn't start shipping until later than that). Chances are, you're not going to see a replacement for at least another year (for example, the now discontinued A200 was first announced in January 2008).

I'm currently shooting with a Sony A700, purchased in 2007, and it still hasn't been replaced with another model in it's market niche (although I expect to see one soon, since we're right at two years since it was announced).

Around 18 months is typical for a dSLR model (sometimes sooner for the models on the entry level side, and sometimes a little longer with more advanced models). Competition within a given market niche also enters the equation.
Hmm. Ok, Thanks. I sm hoping the A230 will be along a little longer though. Also, does the A230 have any kind of dust remover?
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Old Sep 7, 2009, 3:26 PM   #23
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Yes, it has a system designed to "shake off" dust automatically.

But, you can still get stubborn dust particles that may require a sensor cleaning from time to time if a simple burst of air from a rubber bulb doesn't dislodge it, depending on how you use a camera. Dust usually doesn't show up in images unless you're using smaller apertures (represented by higher f/stop numbers), shooting against a brighter background (like a bright sky).

I *very* rarely need to clean a sensor (perhaps once/year).
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Old Sep 7, 2009, 3:46 PM   #24
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Yes, it has a system designed to "shake off" dust automatically.

But, you can still get stubborn dust particles that may require a sensor cleaning from time to time if a simple burst of air from a rubber bulb doesn't dislodge it, depending on how you use a camera. Dust usually doesn't show up in images unless you're using smaller apertures (represented by higher f/stop numbers), shooting against a brighter background (like a bright sky).

I *very* rarely need to clean a sensor (perhaps once/year).
Sweet, thanks. Also thanks for your post about Macro.

Now one more thing: Sarah mentioned something about screw on doubler. What exactly would that do, and can someone link me to one? I can't find anything.
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Old Sep 7, 2009, 4:47 PM   #25
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Default Yes, We Have Close-up Lenses

adam-

You can find all kinds of screw on close-up lenses on E-Bay. Just search for "close-up lenses." They sell for $13.95 for the set.

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Old Sep 7, 2009, 5:22 PM   #26
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adam-

You can find all kinds of screw on close-up lenses on E-Bay. Just search for "close-up lenses." They sell for $13.95 for the set.

Sarah Joyce
Hmm. Interesting. How well do they work? Could they replace a good Macro lens?
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Old Sep 7, 2009, 6:54 PM   #27
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adam-

They work just like filters. These close-up lens just screw on to you normal Sony 18-55mm kit lens and it makes the kit lens able to operate very close to your macro subject.

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Old Sep 7, 2009, 7:11 PM   #28
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Hmm. Interesting. How well do they work? Could they replace a good Macro lens?
This was the closeup lens/filter that I referred to in my earlier post. In theory you can just keep piling these things on until you reach whatever magnification you want. But in practice the more magnification, the more distortion they introduce. Thus they are decidedly inferior to a true macro lens for very close work. My experience is that +3 diopters is about the limit for a clean image with these. Which was the basis for my post. Remember, 40x60 mm field size? Of course the exact field size will also depend on what zoom lens is used with the closeup lens.

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Old Sep 9, 2009, 5:39 PM   #29
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One more question before I decide....

Besides Liveview/Tiltable LCD/Different Viewfinder, is there ANY other difference between the a230 and a330?
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Old Sep 9, 2009, 7:15 PM   #30
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adam-

You have nailed the differences. I have read a number of comments that on the A-330, not only is the viewfinder smaller, but the tilt able LCD places your eye a bit away from the viewfinder.

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