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Old Oct 14, 2009, 12:48 PM   #131
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a dslr is better than a film slr but not as good as a P&S?? that doesn't make sense to me
That statement should not make sense to you. It's incorrect. It relys on the faulty premise that more DOF = better

That's a faulty assumption.

Without narrow depth of field you wouldn't get shots like this:


Or this. HOw distracting is the refrigerator in the background behind my son? Do you even recognize it as a refrigerator?


Given the confined space of my house this second shot is impossible to get with a digicam.
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Old Oct 14, 2009, 12:51 PM   #132
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javacleve-

Just for clarity sake, the Canon Kit lens is now the 18-55mmIS. That is a zoom lit lens, quite typical. The Nifty-Fifty is the Canon 50mm F1.8 lens. It is a separate lens and not that it is also NOT an IS lens. But the Canon 50mm lens is very handy and bright, meaning that it has a wide aperture. Because it does not zoom, the Canon 50mm lens ia also called a prime lens.

I hope that helps.

Sarah Joyce
OK, I read it backwards initially, thanks for the clarification...so you are saying the kit lens 18-55mmIS plus the nifty fifty (which does not have IS but is bright) and the 55-250 for zooming in...it sounds like I would mostly use the 18-55mm (because of the IS), except my one question is, what is the aperture on that one?
Also, on the other thread they talked about the quality of each lens--some are softer than others. I am definitely concerned about that.

What do others think about Jim's recommendation for the Sigma? It makes sense regarding the zoom range that I mostly use, and the brightness of it...as long as the quality is good and the focus would be up to my needs (I understand it might not be best for fast sports, but otherwise--moving children in low light)
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Old Oct 14, 2009, 12:53 PM   #133
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javacleve-

A lot of point and shoot posters frequently ask how they can get that blurred background that is so characteristic of DSLR photos. That is a function of a physically larger imager and a shallow depth of field.

Point and shoot users have only one option: to use a wide aperture. However, they can never get the same blurred background effect, because the CCD imagers used in typical point and shoot cameras is so much physically smaller.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Oct 14, 2009, 12:54 PM   #134
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Originally Posted by JohnG View Post
That statement should not make sense to you. It's incorrect. It relys on the faulty premise that more DOF = better

That's a faulty assumption.

Without narrow depth of field you wouldn't get shots like this:


Or this. HOw distracting is the refrigerator in the background behind my son? Do you even recognize it as a refrigerator?


Given the confined space of my house this second shot is impossible to get with a digicam.

Great shots (and cute kid!), and I do understand what you are saying...at times you don't want "too much" DOF. But my question is, what if you DID want more DOF...is there a way to get that with a DSLR? in the examples you mentioned, of a group shot--that comes up quite often for holidays, parties, vacations--so that's what concerned me
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Old Oct 14, 2009, 12:56 PM   #135
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javacleve-

The Canon kit lens, the 18-55mmIS lens at its widest aperture is only F 3.5. Hence, you can see how the 50mm F 1.8 prime becomes very useful.

All three of the recommended lenses are sharp, fast focusing, and exhibit no softness.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Oct 14, 2009, 12:56 PM   #136
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btw I keep forgetting to mention that I'm not particularly interested in the video aspect of the T1i, as I have a great video cam already...I'd rather see the money spent on a better camera. But I do understand that the T1i is also a good camera. Just wanted to mention that in case it is weighing in on anyone's recommendations.
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Old Oct 14, 2009, 12:58 PM   #137
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Originally Posted by mtclimber View Post
javacleve-

The Canon kit lens, the 18-55mmIS lens at its widest aperture is only F 3.5. Hence, you can see how the 50mm F 1.8 prime becomes very useful.

All three of the recommended lenses are sharp, fast focusing, and exhibit no softness.

Sarah Joyce
ah, yes. Is there an 18-55 mm IS lens that is f2.8 or brighter, then? I'm just thinking, what I would leave on the camera and use 75% of the time, and not have to carry around another lens in case there is low light (as it seems there OFTEN is low light).
Perhaps the one Jim C recommended?
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Old Oct 14, 2009, 1:02 PM   #138
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Originally Posted by mtclimber View Post
javacleve-

A lot of point and shoot posters frequently ask how they can get that blurred background that is so characteristic of DSLR photos. That is a function of a physically larger imager and a shallow depth of field.

Point and shoot users have only one option: to use a wide aperture. However, they can never get the same blurred background effect, because the CCD imagers used in typical point and shoot cameras is so much physically smaller.

Sarah Joyce
Makes sense, it just threw me off when John G posted about the comparison of P&S for group shots and other situations where your focus point might be off a little. This gets me back to my penchant for manual focus--then I KNOW what I'm focusing on!

Last edited by javacleve; Oct 14, 2009 at 1:04 PM.
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Old Oct 14, 2009, 1:03 PM   #139
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Jim C, would that lens have IS? I don't see it mentioned...
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Old Oct 14, 2009, 1:09 PM   #140
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Originally Posted by javacleve View Post
Jim C, would that lens have IS? I don't see it mentioned...

Remember some camera have IS in the body...if so, its not needed in the lens..sony has in body IS..advantage you can use older (used) non IS lens providing that they fit the mount of course...
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