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Old Oct 19, 2009, 12:51 AM   #11
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Check out the killer new canon powershot ds100is. This blog has some great pictures of it.
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Old Oct 19, 2009, 8:42 AM   #12
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cameralovern-

Welcome to the Forum. But...

I guess I must be confused. This thread is a discussion on entry level DSLR cameras. A Canon Powershot model is a point and shoot camera. What gives?

Your link does not contain any reference to your "...new canon powershot ds100is..." What gives?

Sarah Joyce
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Old Oct 19, 2009, 9:00 AM   #13
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snowave-

I would steer clear of the Olympus E-510 two lens kit. I own both the E-510 and the E-620. The E-620 is a much more desirable DSLR camera. You might want to check out the recent reviews, especially at www.dpreview.com which validates that statement in full measure.

If price and performance are the priorities, snowave, the biggest bang for the buck will be found in the Sony A-200 or A-230 DSLR cameras when equipped with the Sony 18-55mm kit lens and the highly reviewed, and less than $200 Sony 55-200mm lens, and the Pentax K-2000, two lens kit, which can also be found at Amazon. Because there are no professional reviews yet, the Pentax KX is a question mark, and an unproven DSLR camera, but it does look rather promising.

The Canon XS and XSi are a bit higher in cost, but both have received excellent reviews. 'Just my personal opinion, but the Pentax K-2000, two lens kit has more going for it than the new Nikon D-3000. If you can find a good deal on the Nikon D-40 with the kit lens and the Nikon 55-200mmVR lens, and you do not need high ISO settings, that is a good value to explore as well.

Now please keep in mind, snowave, these recommendations are based on the supposition that you will be taking landscape, architectural, and the typical traveler type photos, where interior shots requiring ISO speeds in excess of ISO 800 are the rarity.

Have a great day.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Oct 19, 2009, 10:05 AM   #14
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Get and extra battery as all dslr's have propriety batterers and you may need a universal AC adapter depending on where you are staying at.
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Old Oct 19, 2009, 4:44 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mtclimber View Post
Snowave-
Yes, the Olympus E-520 two lens kit is a good value, but there is a reason for that low price. The Olympus E-520 has the least Dynamic Range of all the entry level DSLRs in the market today. if you really understand photography and nail the exposure you can slightly overcome that lack of Dynamic Range. It is difficult but not impossible.

Sarah Joyce
Hi Sarah-

Good point! I think I need to use the manual exposure mode to compensate for its poor dynamic range with my E410. Here are some examples from my E410.

1). Aperture priority mode: washed-out sky



2). Manual exposure mode




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Old Oct 19, 2009, 5:38 PM   #16
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Get and extra battery as all dslr's have propriety batterers and you may need a universal AC adapter depending on where you are staying at.
I was thinking the same thing, appreciate the suggestion !
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Old Oct 19, 2009, 5:38 PM   #17
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Hiro-

That is a great example. Thanks for posting your test results. This same adjustment can be done in the "P" for Programed Auto Mode, that is probably how your first photo was taken.

Then, using your Exposure Compensation Control, select sufficient minus Exposure Compensation to achieve Photo #2. Programed Auto follows its name exactly, it allows you to program whatever changes are required.

Well done! Have a great day.

Sarah Joyce

Last edited by mtclimber; Oct 19, 2009 at 6:47 PM.
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Old Oct 19, 2009, 5:49 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mtclimber View Post
snowave-

I would steer clear of the Olympus E-510 two lens kit. I own both the E-510 and the E-620. The E-620 is a much more desirable DSLR camera. You might want to check out the recent reviews, especially at www.dpreview.com which validates that statement in full measure.

If price and performance are the priorities, snowave, the biggest bang for the buck will be found in the Sony A-200 or A-230 DSLR cameras when equipped with the Sony 18-55mm kit lens and the highly reviewed, and less than $200 Sony 55-200mm lens, and the Pentax K-2000, two lens kit, which can also be found at Amazon. Because there are no professional reviews yet, the Pentax KX is a question mark, and an unproven DSLR camera, but it does look rather promising.

The Canon XS and XSi are a bit higher in cost, but both have received excellent reviews. 'Just my personal opinion, but the Pentax K-2000, two lens kit has more going for it than the new Nikon D-3000. If you can find a good deal on the Nikon D-40 with the kit lens and the Nikon 55-200mmVR lens, and you do not need high ISO settings, that is a good value to explore as well.

Now please keep in mind, snowave, these recommendations are based on the supposition that you will be taking landscape, architectural, and the typical traveler type photos, where interior shots requiring ISO speeds in excess of ISO 800 are the rarity.

Have a great day.

Sarah Joyce
I was aware of the ISO, but my priority is outdoor photography. Right now I am leaning towards purchasing an Cannon Digital Rebel XT 8MP DSLR
(body only) as I went into Best Buy today and felt the XS and it feels kind of small which a friend of my said to consider.

I have increased my budget by another 100-150 so I can purchase a wide angle lense. I was recommended this lense by a friend who shoots landscape often.

Sigma Zoom Super Wide Angle AF 17-70mm f/2.8-4.5 DC Macro Autofocus Lens

Would love your thoughts or suggestions for my thoughts thus far.
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Old Oct 19, 2009, 6:52 PM   #19
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snowave-

The Sigma 17-70mm lens is one that I use as a walk around lens. In 35mm terms, on a Canon DSLR camera is gives you about 27mm to 112mm a very nice range. The Sigma version is very sharp.

Regarding the XT model: if you can get it at a very good price and you will be using it out of doors in good light, it could work. However, you should also know that it is today several generations out of date. In good light, the Canon XT equipped with the Sigma 17-70mm lens will focus accurately and the lens is capable of good sharpness as you can see in the attached photo sample.

My patient subject is my husband Bradley. also please be aware that due to its age, the XT has a very small 1.5 or 1.8 LCD screen.

Sarah Joyce
Attached Images
 

Last edited by mtclimber; Oct 19, 2009 at 7:07 PM.
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Old Oct 19, 2009, 8:00 PM   #20
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If landscapes are important to you, the Olympus 14-42mm kit lens isn't very wide. The Sigma 17-70mm f/2.8-4.0 lens is quite good, and has a wider angle of view when mounted on a Nikon, Pentax or Sony, than the Olympus 14-42mm kit lens, by virtue of their larger image sensors.

Since the less expensive Nikon and Sony dSLRs aren't availabel without a kit lens, it doesn't make a lot of sense to buy a camera with a lens and then buy another lens. Within your budget, I'd look at the lower end dSLRs from Pentax, to which I'd add the Sigma 17-70.

That lens costs $370, To keep the cost down, I'd go with the 10MP Pentax K2000 body with sensor shift image stabilization.
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