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Old Oct 29, 2009, 7:23 AM   #21
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quikgp-

During a beginning phase in using a DSLR camera, it is wise to:

(1) Get familiar with and very knowledgeable about your camera.
(2) Learn to get the very most from your kit lens
(3) Determine in what areas you want to improve and learn more
(4) Resist the temptation to purchase any more lenses until you really determine the style and type of photos that will be your priority.

A fish eye lens is a lens that shows a lot of image curvature. It is a special effects lens. Do not confuse a fish eye lens with a wide angle lens, please. On the other hand realize that your kit lens, at it 18mm position is a wide angle lens. In 35mm terms, that 18mm position on your kit lens equates to 28mm, which is indeed a wide angle on your Canon XSi camera.

Generally speaking, the 50mm prime lens is valued because it can provide a wide aperture for high ISO shots at a very reasonable price. It is called a "prime" lens because it does not zoom at all.

Until you establish a stable work flow and the types of photos that you really want to learn more about and become proficient in taking, I would suggest that you hold off on lens and accessories. i suggest that because in the beginning phase folks often purchase lenses and accessories that really are not useful later when they have gained some experience and established their priorities.

Have a good day.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Oct 29, 2009, 7:29 AM   #22
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You haven't been very specific about the type(s) of photography you want to do, so it's difficult to recommend lenses. You've selected a Canon dSLR, which gives you a very large selection of lenses and accessories to choose from, some of which are the best in their class.

The 18-55 IS kit lens is a good wide angle to medium telephoto lens lens, but if you need something wider to shoot landscapes or architecture, there are a number of good choices. Similarly, there are also good choices for sports/action/wildlife, and for macro photography as well. If you know what you want to shoot now but can't, we can help, but you haven't indicated as much.

Among the general purpose telephoto zoom lenses that you might want, and that don't cost an arm and a leg, there's the Canon 55-250 IS, and the Tamron 55-200 Di II and 70-300 Di LD, that are longer than the kit lens you've got.

And if what you mean by "all-rounder" is a superzoom (i.e.: 18-200, i8-250), while some are better than others, and newer ones are significant improvements on older ones, none of them is as good as the kit lens you've got now, aren't as good as the lenses I mentioned earlier, and can cost a lot more than two or more lenses of less ambitious zoom ranges.

Quote:
Originally Posted by quikgp View Post
Is there a difference between Wide angle/Fish Eye/Macro lenses?
Yes. What do you want to shoot. For instance, landscape photography can tolerate a little distortion, but architectural photography can't.

Quote:
Originally Posted by quikgp View Post
Is there a better prime lens to get? (I have been recommended 50mm)
Yes, but it depends on what you want to shoot. For instance, if you want to shoot indoor sports, a 50mm prime would be a waste of money, and for portraits, you can't get very close so you can't do head& shoulders shots without cropping.

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Originally Posted by quikgp View Post
The more I learn about this hobby the more expensive it seems to get!
If you only just discovered this, that's our fault. Sorry.
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Old Oct 29, 2009, 7:35 AM   #23
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kakapham-

Welcome to the Forum!

So that we can provide with useful and specific information, we really need some more detailed information about the type of photo you wish to place emphasis upon. Perhaps, sport, street photography, family and children photography, landscapes, etc. You see, the kind of photos that you desire to focus upon will directly impact your lens choices.

It would be nice to know in which part of the world you live as environmental and climates also affect your shooting conditions and the proper care of your camera.

You merely re-posted quikgp's original posting. Does his budget, priorities, and desires describe your budget, priorities, and desires, precisely? I hardly see how that might be possible. Please keep in mind that good, and useful suggestions must be based on personalized information. So please help us out with much more specific and personalized information.

Have a grat day.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Oct 29, 2009, 8:06 AM   #24
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Congratulations on your new kit.

You are in the same boat as a lot of people who when getting a new camera want to add everything all at once. If you want to learn how to take good photos, I would stick with the lens you have then after using that for a while see where you are wanting more, it could be reach, ability to shoot closer, wider angle etc. The kit lens will give a good starting point.
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Old Oct 29, 2009, 1:22 PM   #25
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I am really looking to learn how to shoot most things, and learn as much as a can with this camera, so I think I will take most people's advice and try to get the best I can with the current kit lens I have. That way I'll know what I'm really looking for when I start buying lenses.

As for what I would like to shoot: primarily nature shots, landscapes as well as close-ups, and maybe some animal shots. Also, I would like to be able to shoot architecture as well, when I'm on vacation. I would also like to shoot people/portraits and I imagine doing those things often. Actually, kind of as an afterthough, I'd probably like to learn to do product shots (ie I want to take a proffesional looking photo of say speakers, or computer parts, etc)

fish-eye lenses intrigue me, as I love the look of the pictures. Not sure if this is a feasible reason to shoot, but hey, they look cool.

Other things I would love to learn to shoot over time, but cannot invision myself shooting these things often:
-fireworks/lightning
-sports
-sunsets
-cool lighting type photos (I think over-exposure might be the term?) - streaked lines of light through your pictures
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Old Oct 29, 2009, 1:49 PM   #26
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"If you only just discovered this, that's our fault. Sorry."

Very deft.
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Old Oct 29, 2009, 10:24 PM   #27
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Kevincop-

As you have most probably seen, we amke a very sincere effort on this Forum to tailor our advice, rather precisely, to the needs of the poster. It really is unfortunate, that you made the decision to tag on to this thread as opposed to beginning a new thread as you have done multiple times in the past.

So, I hope that you will understand that we are going to have to begin all over again in gathering enough information to provide you with realistic advice.

What budget have you allocated for your DSLR purchase?

Do you favor one DSLR brand over another?

Are you shooting sports or in any venue that traditionally is plagued with an extremely low light environment?

Are you looking only for an entry level DSLR camera, or are you willing to jump upwards by several levels, where the camera body cost alone will probably be $900 to $1200?

Please tell us the exact kind of photos you now want to shoot, as well as those you have considered for the future?


Thanks, kevincop, that will get us started into helping you with your DSLR decision.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Oct 30, 2009, 3:02 AM   #28
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I will also add that it's a good idea to start your own topic. That way, your communication won't be crossed with the communications of others, and your specific needs and concerns can be addressed more easily.
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