Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > What Camera Should I Buy?

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Oct 19, 2009, 9:06 AM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 6
Default Newbie, looking for first DSLR, but need help with specific deal

OK, so I'm new here and I'm looking to pick up the hobby, but to be honest, I know so little about photography I'm a bit lost right now. I'm looking to pick up a digital SLR to get me started, but I don't want to spend TONS of money for features I wont use (and I have no idea what those might be) but I don't want to buy a camera that I will be unhappy with because it has no features (again, I don't know what features I wouldn't be able to live without). Please help!

So here is the scoop - My boss is selling his old Canon Rebel XT with a sigma lens (18-200mm 1:3.5-6.3 with Image stabilization), plus 2 batteries, orginal kit lens and 4 gb compact flash card all for $500. i know its a nice lens, but I"m not sure about the camera.

Otherwise I'm looking at buying the newer XS kit for $550, and buying a lens down the road.

a final option, I'm considering saving for a little longer and buying the 40D because of the magnesium body - is there any merit to that?

Please help!


Just found this!

Budget
- USD $500.

Are you new to cameras?
- Yes, previous experience is limited to basic point and shoot.

Where do you plan on using this camera?
- Anywhere and everywhere. I'm getting my feet wet, and want to learn as much about the hobby as possible

Do you plan on using this camera indoors or in low light?
- I plan to shoot both indoor and outdoor

Do you plan on taking lots of sports or other action photos?
- maybe? probably?

Will you want manual settings and lots of features?
- yes and yes

How much will you need to zoom?
- thats what additional lenses are for right?

How large will you need to make your prints?
- at the moment, I'm not concerned with print size. 2x3 will be the smallest, with 8x10 being the standard?

Size
- Not a primary concern.

How many megapixels will suffice for you?
- 8 mp or more

How important is “image quality” to you?
- Extremely important

Do you need any of the following special features?
- Wide angle: again, thats what lenses are for right?
- View finder: meaning lcd viewing? (ie live view?) it would be nice, but not vital
- Image stabilization: Very Important.

Are there particular brands you like or hate?
- seems to be nikon or canon for me...maybe sony

Are there particular models you already have in mind?

- Canon rebel xs/xsi
- Cannon rebel xt
- Canon 40d (if its worth it, I'll save up more for this camera)

Would you like forum members to suggest accessories used often?

Yes!!!!!


Thanks,
Joel

Last edited by quikgp; Oct 19, 2009 at 9:22 AM.
quikgp is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Oct 19, 2009, 9:17 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
mtclimber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Oregon, USA
Posts: 18,143
Default

Joel-

Welcome to the Forum!

For starters, diplomatically pass on the boss's Canon XT with the Sigma 18-200mm lens. The price is too high, the XT model is several generations old, and the original XT had some problems focusing consistently in all lighting conditions. I used to own a Canon XT. The Sigma 18-200mm lens dies not have IS (Sigma calls it OS) if it is more than 18 months old.

The Canon XS or XSi is a much better DSLR camera. Equipped with the Canon 18-55mmIS kit lens and coupled with the Canon 55-250mmIS lens you have a nice kit.

If the physical size of your DSLR is a priority, then you are going to like the XS and XSi much better than the canon 40D.

Have a great day.

Sarah Joyce
mtclimber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 19, 2009, 9:29 AM   #3
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 6
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mtclimber View Post
Joel-

Welcome to the Forum!

For starters, diplomatically pass on the boss's Canon XT with the Sigma 18-200mm lens. The price is too high, the XT model is several generations old, and the original XT had some problems focusing consistently in all lighting conditions. I used to own a Canon XT. The Sigma 18-200mm lens dies not have IS (Sigma calls it OS) if it is more than 18 months old.

The Canon XS or XSi is a much better DSLR camera. Equipped with the Canon 18-55mmIS kit lens and coupled with the Canon 55-250mmIS lens you have a nice kit.

If the physical size of your DSLR is a priority, then you are going to like the XS and XSi much better than the canon 40D.

Have a great day.

Sarah Joyce
thank you for the advice! can I ask, what the difference between OS and IS is?
quikgp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 19, 2009, 9:38 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
TCav's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Washington, DC, Metro Area, Maryland
Posts: 13,544
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by quikgp View Post
... what the difference between OS and IS is?
Same function; different trademark.
__________________
  • The lens is the thing.
  • 'Full Frame' is the new 'Medium Format'.
  • "One good test is worth a thousand expert opinions." - Tex Johnston, Boeing 707 test pilot.
TCav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 19, 2009, 9:53 AM   #5
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 6
Default

does it really matter which entry level camera I look at between sony, canon and nikon?
quikgp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 19, 2009, 10:36 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
mtclimber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Oregon, USA
Posts: 18,143
Default

Joel-

All of the entry level DSLR cameras will give you very good to excellent image quality results under normal outdoor lighting conditions. If you want to shoot in low light level environments, using numerically higher ISO settings, then then answer becomes somewhat different. Please keep in mind that, generally speaking, most DSLR camera manufacturers make the assumption that the user will be doing some post processing of the images. If post processing your images is not among your favorite things, then cameras like the Niko D-40/D-3000 family of DSLR cameras might better address your preferences, as those cameras, like typical point and shoot cameras do a lot of in camera post production of the images.

The Nikon D-5000/D-90, the Pentax KX, and the Sony A-500 are better adapted to deal with low light level environments with numerically high ISO settings.

Sarah Joyce

Last edited by mtclimber; Oct 19, 2009 at 10:41 AM.
mtclimber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 23, 2009, 10:24 AM   #7
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 6
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mtclimber View Post
The Nikon D-5000/D-90, the Pentax KX, and the Sony A-500 are better adapted to deal with low light level environments with numerically high ISO settings.

Sarah Joyce
what about the Canon 40 D
quikgp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 23, 2009, 10:31 AM   #8
Super Moderator
 
Mark1616's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 7,397
Default

The 40D is a nice camera although 1 generation old.

You mention sports as a possible requirement, this can add other considerations as if you grow with a system then some options might be better than others. What sports might you want to shoot, at what level and for what purpose?

Because of lens options and AF performance for sports I would be looking at Canon or Nikon but you lose in body stabilisation.
Mark1616 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 23, 2009, 7:06 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
mtclimber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Oregon, USA
Posts: 18,143
Default

Joel-

Based on your posted budget ($500.00), I think we have departed from that budget, when the discussion veers over to the Canon 40D. It appears that you are well beyond your original budget.

Ideally you must use your budget for the DSLR body, the kit lens, and perhaps a second lens or a good external flash. That would probably justify an incrrase in your original budget.

The lower priced DSLR cameras like the Sony A-200 or A-230 allow you to get started and they give you a lot of bang for the buck. However, the best way to start is to first select a system you can live with over the long haul. And then buy into that system, at whatever level you decide, as the budget is seeming like it has become soewhat flexible.

I have attached a Sony A-230 image taken with the highly reviewed Sony 55-200mm lens (less than $200) and a Sony external flash.

Sarah Joyce
Attached Images
 
mtclimber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 23, 2009, 7:08 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
mtclimber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Oregon, USA
Posts: 18,143
Default

And for the Pixel Peepers, I am also attaching a 100% Crop of the above Sony A-230 photo.

Sarah Joyce
Attached Images
 
mtclimber is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:45 AM.