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Old Oct 30, 2009, 5:12 PM   #41
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Originally Posted by varminter22 View Post
Dumb question here from an amateur.

Although not a MAGIC point/shoot camera, won't the Rebel XSi (in program/auto mode) perform very well as a point/shoot camera??
Yes and no. I say 'no' because a DSLR usually has less in-camera processing than a digicam. So people often think the images appear soft. The detail is there, the camera just didn't apply as much sharpening as a digicam does. So, some people are disappointed by that. The solution is to either post process (which is the reason DSLRs do this - the assumption the photographer wants to process the images) or use the camera's menu system to bump up in-camera sharpening and potentially other things like saturation (another variable digicams bump up a bit more than DSLRs).

Then there's the matter of depth-of-field (DOF) and focusing. Digicams because of their smaller sensors and physically shorter lenses produce images with more depth-of-field - i.e. more appears to be in focus than the same shot with a DSLR. So, when the digicam focuses on the wall behind the person it's not that noticable. When a DSLR focuses on the wall rather than the person (and the photographer isn't paying attention to which focus point is being used or not selecting a focus point and not paying attention that a focus point is on the subject) the person is out of focus. This is another aspect that gives people a little more difficulty. It's really not that challenging to overcome this. But I wanted to point this out as it is a problem area for people that want to just 'point and shoot'. Also, most DSLRs don't have the best implementation of live-view focusing. So, you get better results using the viewfinder. Some people don't like that - they're used to using the LCD to compose. To make matters worse, a DSLR is a bit heavier - especially if you throw on a larger lens. It's not a good idea to compose images at arms length with a setup like that. So, having the camera pressed to your face and elbows in, in a good shooting position produces better shots.

If you understand all these differences then a DSLR can absolutely take shots in auto mode as well as any digicam.
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Old Oct 30, 2009, 5:25 PM   #42
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varminter-

I find no disagreement with the statement that, in the P for Program Mode, the Canon XSi, does become essentially an expensive point and shoot camera. However, the XSi is much more capable of doing more.

The growth effect is for the XSi user to feel challenged and to learn more about basic photography so that the user becomes more skilled, and uses more features of the XSi camera, getting better images in the process.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Oct 30, 2009, 9:02 PM   #43
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Many thanks.

I am seriously considering the XSi.

It will be used for many purposes, including family, hunting/camping trips, and shooting competition events. I do prefer to be able to shoot at least two or three frames per second.

If there is a more suitable camera in your opinion, I would be quite happy to look and consider it!

Thanks again!

Larry
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Old Oct 30, 2009, 9:07 PM   #44
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Larry,

if you plan to shoot in very low light situations. aka dawn in the duckblind. i would consider moving up to the Canon t1i as it has ISO 3200 available (XSi stops at 1600). which will allow you to get the shutter speeds you need in lower light situations. if you don't foresee shooting in very low light situations. then the XSi would perform every bit as well.

-Dustin
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Old Oct 30, 2009, 9:08 PM   #45
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varminter-

It may be that Burst Photo Requirement that pushes you toward a DSLR cvamera like the Canon XSi. I was going to suggest that you take a good look at the Sony H-20 point & shoot camera as an alternative. Howere it does not have that burst rate.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Oct 30, 2009, 9:10 PM   #46
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varminter-

It may be that Burst Photo Requirement that pushes you toward a DSLR cvamera like the Canon XSi. I was going to suggest that you take a good look at the Sony H-20 point & shoot camera as an alternative. Howere it does not have that burst rate.

Sarah Joyce
i am thinking with shooting competitions. the improved AF and zero shutter lag of a DSLR would be almost necessary.
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Old Oct 30, 2009, 9:27 PM   #47
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I've raised this before but there is no possible way to show sharpness without posting a 100% crop. It is very easy to make almost any photo look sharp when it is reduced to this sort of size, also a sharp photo can become soft in the process of resizing so again not an accurate method.

Another thing for everyone to consider is that different cameras have differing levels of sharpening. I believe as standard the Olys have more in camera sharpness due to its settings.
I don't think it's sharp at all. And I blame the lens not the camera. I'm sure the camera is quite capable of sharp images - From this distance, these are not even close.

Dave
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Old Oct 30, 2009, 9:32 PM   #48
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100 percent crop from the Sigma DP2



No offense to anyone, but it's the lens as well as the camera.

Dave
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Old Oct 30, 2009, 9:55 PM   #49
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Chato-

That is really impressive. However, I am also reminded, by my internal senses, that we ought to take a close look at the ISO speed, the shutter speed and the aperture, when we directly compare images. So, Chato, can you please post the full EXIF for your photo.

Thanks in advance.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Oct 31, 2009, 12:29 PM   #50
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Chato-

That is really impressive. However, I am also reminded, by my internal senses, that we ought to take a close look at the ISO speed, the shutter speed and the aperture, when we directly compare images. So, Chato, can you please post the full EXIF for your photo.

Thanks in advance.

Sarah Joyce
The EXIF data is embedded in the image. But to save you the trouble, It's ISO 200, I/80, f4.

Here, is a 200 percent crop of the same image. BTW, there's little to choose between ISO 200 and 400 with the Sigma.



Now while I absolutely love this little camera, my D2x with a good lens will easily match this quality.


Dave

Last edited by Chato; Oct 31, 2009 at 12:33 PM. Reason: addendum
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