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Old Oct 21, 2009, 9:31 PM   #1
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Default Upgrading, what camera should I choose next?

I currently have a Panasonic FZ8 but am ready to upgrade. Im only just learning and would love to do a course. Basically I want to be able to take great shots of storms (lightening etc), family and travel shots (landscapes) and concerts (low light conditions) Im not good on the technical side of things so still want the point and shoot feature. Im looking at the canon 50d but its going to have to last me quite a while. Is this a good choose or is there something much more suitable without costing an arm and a leg.

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Old Oct 21, 2009, 9:44 PM   #2
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Kaisha-

This is only my opinion. However, I would be very slow to upgrade to the Canon 50D, until you had mastered more of the technical aspects of photography. Otherwise the Canon 50D will, I would guess, become a rather frustrating experience for you.

By the way, the Panasonic TZ-8 has not yet been manufactured. The latest Panasonic camera in that series is the ZS3 or TZ-7. Move ahead more slowly, as you make a real effort to learn more of the technical aspects of general photography. It really will serve you well and allow you later to get more from using the Canon 50D camera.

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Old Oct 21, 2009, 9:48 PM   #3
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it sounds like any good entry-level dslr would serve your purposes well. the 50d and similar might be an overkill for you at this point, as well as costing you alot more money and being larger and heavier.

within Canon's own line of dslrs. have a look at the Canon Rebel XSi, great camera and good value. if you plan to shoot in lower light conditions where a higher ISO is required, or you wish to have the ability to shoot movies as well, you can spend a little more and get the Canon Rebel T1i.

lens selection will be important too. the kit lens 18-55 IS is quite good and offers image stability. however, it will not give you as much "zoom" as your superzoom panasonic. so if you find yourself using the longer focal lengths alot on your panasonic, you may consider adding a telephoto lens as well. if you do not, mainly shooting landscapes and closer family shots, you may not need it right now.
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Old Oct 21, 2009, 9:49 PM   #4
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oh, i had read it FZ-8. lol.

yes, also good advice Sarah, a good featured p&s would serve you well in the beginning phases of learning too.
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Old Oct 21, 2009, 9:58 PM   #5
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My mistake, its the fz 8. That's not as fast as I would like it. I think I made another mistake. What about the canon 500d? I do want it to take shots in low light (concerts) etc as well as storms, the kids etc. I still want to take movies and of course your point and shoot. So is the rebel t1i my best choice?
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Old Oct 21, 2009, 11:40 PM   #6
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kaisha-

As Hards indicated, any of the Canon DSLR cameras will provide an excellent learning platform. I particularly like the smaller and entry level XS model. It does not seem to have the focusing problems so often associated with the more complex, Canon XSi model.

Thanks for the correction, the Panasonic FZ-8 was a wonderful entry level super zoom camera. As I understand it, it is now your desire to expand your photo knowledge, and to move upwards to a more complex camera that would provide you with a camera that would provide more hands-on experience and learning for yourself. That is an excellent idea.

Personally, I have also found the Sony A-200 or A-230 to also be a good "learning vehicle" at a smaller cost. However, the choice is entirely up to you.

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Old Oct 21, 2009, 11:52 PM   #7
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With all due respect to Hards80, I recoil every time I hear the phrase "entry level DSLR". It is my opinion that they do not exist. We do, however, have an abundance of "entry level photographers" around. As such, most do not need 8fps, weather sealed bodies, the ability to shoot tethered to a PC, 100,000 count shutters, outer space iso limits, etc., ad nauseum, the very things the pros need because their camera is putting food on their table and paying their mortgage. So where does that leave the rest of us? Probably buying a camera we can afford, some fair to middling glass, and a few thousand dollars in our pockets. All that said, the Canon Rebel series has pretty impressive iso performance. And if you need point and shoot, it's there, until you get a little braver. You want the camera to last a while, and it will, unless you fall prey to "upgrade fever", and end up with a camera newer than your present one but only marginally better, if at all. Sorry for the rant...

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Old Oct 21, 2009, 11:58 PM   #8
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honestly sarah, i have not seen these wide-spread reports of focus problems on the xsi. the xsi has a better autofocus system, 9pt vs 7pt and it has a 2.8 cross sensor vs the 5.6 on the xs
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Old Oct 22, 2009, 12:03 AM   #9
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Re my last post, my point exactly. Sarah mentions the Sony A200 and A230. Personally, between the two of them, I would go for the A200, simply because the A230 is missing some things Sony felt you don't need anymore. Like the AEL button. I would certainly miss that feature, because I use it frequently. All "upgrades" are not neccessarily for the better, do your homework.

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Old Oct 22, 2009, 1:49 AM   #10
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Great posts Hawgwild!!

You mentioned several thought provoking ideas...and raised one question..weather sealed cameras...who makes them and what exactly is weather sealed? (I DO know you can't scuba with them LOL, but that's about it..))
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