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Old Nov 7, 2009, 5:20 PM   #11
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in perfect sunny conditions for landscapes or other such things where shallow dof is not needed or wanted, then the differences will be smaller. of course the dslr will have more dynamic range and better per-pixel sharpness, etc, so there is a difference, but in optimal conditions those differences shrink.

however, even for your own intended purposes the dslr is worth it. for gatherings and family shots in the home, an external flash makes a huge difference in the quality of the shots. for shallow depth of field to blur the background on family portraits, the dslr is the only way to achieve this.

but if you are happy with just snapshots with onboard flash, the movie capabilities and good performance in ideal light, the p&s may be enough.
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Old Nov 7, 2009, 5:27 PM   #12
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hards-

I happen to agree with you completely. The only real difference comes when you want more ISO capability.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Nov 7, 2009, 8:44 PM   #13
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I think it also depends on a person behind the camera. For example, a skillful person can take better pics with a P&S camera than me with a DSLR.

Right now I'm using an entry model DSLR Olympus E410. If I spend extra $800, I can get flagship models like the E-3 or E-30. But, with my skill I don't think I can take better pics with them. But, I still want them. So, I guess that all depends.....

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Old Nov 8, 2009, 6:35 AM   #14
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I really didn't want to make this a dslr vs p/s. Since the Fz35 and even the canon sx20is are highly regarded cameras, I just wanted to know if the extra money is worth it to purchase the Pentax......
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Old Nov 8, 2009, 7:43 AM   #15
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Within the very narrow scope of your original question, no. Outside on a bright sunny day, there won't be any significant difference in image quality.

What the extra $300 buys you is the possibility of doing much more much better.

What else do you plan to take photos of?
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Old Nov 8, 2009, 8:27 AM   #16
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I find this interesting as I own both a DSLR and an older model Panasonic superzoom. Note that the difference is really more like $700 to get the superzoom capabilities as you would have to add an 18-250 lens to get close. Print size becomes very important at high ISOs. Suggest you go to www.imaging-resource.com and check out the high ISO pictures from the Panasonic and high end DSLRs at normal 4x6 print size. You will see little difference even at high ISO. Note also that you can adjust the flash strength on the Panasonic to somewhat mitigate the typical glare from the flash. DSLRs are for camera enthusiasts, hobbyists or professionals. The single huge exception is if you are wanting to photograph your kids or friends in indoor or night sports, indoor theater or music events or other low light indoor or outdoor activities where the flash is either prohibited or useless. Getting a DSLR is not, however, a magic bullet to getting good pictures. You have to work at getting good low light shots, understanding the relationships between ISO, shutter speed and aperture, PLUS having the right fast lens. Sound like fun? Actually, it is if you are willing to invest the time and money to make it work. I have assisted several new disappointed DLSR owners who thought they could just put the camera in P mode with a kit lens and get good pictures of their kid playing basketball in a dimly lit gym. As many others have pointed out, the right camera for you depends on what you want to do with it. I do go on and on. but one last thought. I use my DSLR professionally as a newspaper reporter and photo journalist. When I am on a family vacation, however, I take my point and shoot. I have watched too many DSLR owners, at Disneyland for example, messing around with lenses and getting the right exposure when their family just wants to have fun. For what its worth.
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Old Nov 8, 2009, 8:54 AM   #17
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Many folks use the two camera strategy-

A DSLR for those special shots that are really important and where photographic quality really matters. And a very good point and shoot camera for those spur of the moment, family fun, hurry up we are waiting, kind of shots.

Have a great day.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Nov 8, 2009, 10:43 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mtclimber View Post
Many folks use the two camera strategy-

A DSLR for those special shots that are really important and where photographic quality really matters. And a very good point and shoot camera for those spur of the moment, family fun, hurry up we are waiting, kind of shots.

Have a great day.

Sarah Joyce
Good point Sarah.

Sometimes I wish I had a good super zoom P & S camera. For example, I often see bald eagles. By the time I put a zoom lens on my DSLR, they are usually out of reach already.
I haven't really seen sample pics taken with the FZ35, but I have seen great zoom shots taken with the FZ28 or Olympus SP-590. But, in many cases, the image quality just doesn't cut it to my eyes.

However, I would say better than missing a great opportunity.

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Old Nov 8, 2009, 11:15 AM   #19
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In my case the IQ would be more important than the zoom capabilities. In the mean time I would be using the kit lense. My thoughts are I can use the 3x zoom of the Pentax and later crop them ?....what do you guys think of that ?
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Old Nov 8, 2009, 12:36 PM   #20
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anthony_b-

Certainly the 12mp imager coupled with an excellent kit lens will provide real advantages as long as the images are over cropped. However, you cannot crop a whole lot in an attempt to equal the zoom power of the FZ-35.

Have a great day.

Sarah Joyce
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