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Old Nov 29, 2009, 11:39 AM   #11
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I don't know for a fact, but it seems your Canon Speedlite 420EX is compatible with Canon EOS dSLRs and PowerShot "G" Series P&S digicams.

Your Canon 28-80 isn't much, but on a tight budget, it will get you started. Since Canon's entry level dSLRs have smaller image sensors that the film exposures in your 35mm SLR, the angle of view will be narrower. On an XSi, it will work like a 45-128mm lens.

Actually, the autofocus on the Canon XSi is pretty good. A lot depends on the lens nad the light, and perhaps the reviews you've read were by people that are more accustomed to pro level equipment. See Steve's review here: http://www.steves-digicams.com/camer...rebel-xsi-slr/
OK, so I understand some of what you said....

I learn fast, but don't know alot about what all is out there.

I figured out P&S was point and shoot.....OK far so good

I assume that these other kinds of Canon cameras, the "Canon EOS dSLRs and PowerShot "G" Series P&S digicams" are other kinds you can just get a body without a lens to possibily try my lens with....or check into compatability.

As far as how the lens would work and what all that means, I can't really understand it all but "the angle of view will be narrower" means I won't be able to get as much in the shot widthwise ??

And I can see that using the lens I have with different bodies will change the way the lens works......so with the XSi it would .......explain what the numbers mean in what kind of pictures I would get......guess I don't know much about what the numbers mean

As for the autofocas on the XSi, the reviews I read where on Amazon and the complaint was that focas was not as sharp as their, acutally, cheaper point and shoot cameras even when testing them side by side. I will read Steve's review though.
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Old Nov 29, 2009, 11:48 AM   #12
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Aunt Nelly-

Yes, I own and use the Sony H-20. Yes, you can select the Active Sports Scene Mode and the shutter will be increase automatically. The Sony H-20 is a very capable camera. You might ask how can I make that judgement. Well, I have taught digital cameras for our State University and for our local Community College for the last 15 years.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Nov 29, 2009, 11:55 AM   #13
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OK, so I understand some of what you said....

I learn fast, but don't know alot about what all is out there.

I figured out P&S was point and shoot.....OK far so good

I assume that these other kinds of Canon cameras, the "Canon EOS dSLRs and PowerShot "G" Series P&S digicams" are other kinds you can just get a body without a lens to possibily try my lens with....or check into compatability.

As far as how the lens would work and what all that means, I can't really understand it all but "the angle of view will be narrower" means I won't be able to get as much in the shot widthwise ??

And I can see that using the lens I have with different bodies will change the way the lens works......so with the XSi it would .......explain what the numbers mean in what kind of pictures I would get......guess I don't know much about what the numbers mean

As for the autofocas on the XSi, the reviews I read where on Amazon and the complaint was that focas was not as sharp as their, acutally, cheaper point and shoot cameras even when testing them side by side. I will read Steve's review though.
disregard anything you read in amazon reviews.

those focus and sharpness issues are the result of operator error. people buy a dslr and magically expect their photography to improve, without making any effort to improve their skills as a photographer and thus are unhappy and write in to amazon. in capable hands the xsi delivers pro quality results.

that said, buying a dslr is an investment of not only money, but also time. to get good results from a dslr you must have at least a rudimentary understanding of depth of field and its relationship to aperture and keeping proper shutter speeds, etc. so it takes a little practice and a little reading up online. however, you are already shooting a film slr, which go by the same rules.

another thing, going the route of the dslr requires at least some post-processing knowledge, at the least learning to sharpen, tweak contrast and saturation in the included software. will take a little time, but worth it. when dslr manufacturers set the output images from their camera, they apply less sharpening and contrast/saturation than they do on p&s, which makes people believe their images are flat and soft. the detail and color is in there, they are just leaving it up to you to tweak it the way you want.

if you are looking for straight out of the camera images and do not wish to at least learn the basics in post-processing, most people will get images that please them more from a p&s.

however, if you are willing to at least learn the basics of skills and post-processing, you will be rewarded with your purchase of a dslr.
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Old Nov 29, 2009, 11:59 AM   #14
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Aunt Nelly-

Yes, I own and use the Sony H-20. Yes, you can select the Active Sports Scene Mode and the shutter will be increase automatically. The Sony H-20 is a very capable camera. You might ask how can I make that judgement. Well, I have taught digital cameras for our State University and for our local Community College for the last 15 years.

Sarah Joyce
Not questioning your judgement, as you can see, I am almost totally lost here

WOW, I would say you are knowledgable after teaching for that long.....but I also realize you know how to set the camera so you can make it do what you want, where I might not be able to do that.....that is why I asked.

I am toying with the idea of getting this Sony or a digital Canon body for my one lens. The biggest factor is money as well as the compatability of my lens to the new body, which I am finding from the other guys post, isn't just "stick it on and it works the same as with the film"

I appreciate your judgement and help......I have alot at stake in this decision.
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Old Nov 29, 2009, 12:19 PM   #15
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the kit lens with the XSi is better than your one lens.

the old 28-80 kit that comes with film rebels is pretty bad. i wouldn't even bother mounting it on a new dslr.
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Old Nov 29, 2009, 12:40 PM   #16
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disregard anything you read in amazon reviews.

those focus and sharpness issues are the result of operator error. people buy a dslr and magically expect their photography to improve, without making any effort to improve their skills as a photographer and thus are unhappy and write in to amazon. in capable hands the xsi delivers pro quality results.

that said, buying a dslr is an investment of not only money, but also time. to get good results from a dslr you must have at least a rudimentary understanding of depth of field and its relationship to aperture and keeping proper shutter speeds, etc. so it takes a little practice and a little reading up online. however, you are already shooting a film slr, which go by the same rules.

another thing, going the route of the dslr requires at least some post-processing knowledge, at the least learning to sharpen, tweak contrast and saturation in the included software. will take a little time, but worth it. when dslr manufacturers set the output images from their camera, they apply less sharpening and contrast/saturation than they do on p&s, which makes people believe their images are flat and soft. the detail and color is in there, they are just leaving it up to you to tweak it the way you want.

if you are looking for straight out of the camera images and do not wish to at least learn the basics in post-processing, most people will get images that please them more from a p&s.

however, if you are willing to at least learn the basics of skills and post-processing, you will be rewarded with your purchase of a dslr.
This is all very informative........thanks !

I can understand from what you wrote that without wanting to put alot of time into learning all this, it might be better to go for the Sony H-20 recommended above.....

I have always wanted to get more into photography, but back when I was younger and before having 9 children that was a possibility but now, I suppose my time is more limited. I would really like to learn more, but time is not something I have alot of right now so this is really great to know in advance of my decision.

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Originally Posted by Hards80 View Post
the kit lens with the XSi is better than your one lens.

the old 28-80 kit that comes with film rebels is pretty bad. i wouldn't even bother mounting it on a new dslr.
I guess my bad lens has been OK for me at the level I am at now, but I can appreciate knowing that putting it on a newer body might not be as ideal as I would hope.....but if I do not do that, then I won't be able to do this option since I am way short on cash for the body and lens.
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Old Nov 29, 2009, 12:44 PM   #17
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The Canon PowerShot "G" series is a line of good quality P&S digicams. They can't use your lens the way a Canon EOS dSLR could, but it can use your flash which is a good one. Based on that, if you're hesitant to get a dSLR, I think you should seriously consider one of Canon's PowerShot "G" series digicams.

But I humbly defer to mtclimber on P&S issues.
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Old Nov 29, 2009, 12:46 PM   #18
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The Canon PowerShot "G" series is a line of good quality P&S digicams. They can't use your lens the way a Canon EOS dSLR could, but it can use your flash which is a good one. Based on that, if you're hesitant to get a dSLR, I think you should seriously consider one of Canon's PowerShot "G" series digicams.

But I humbly defer to mtclimber on P&S issues.
i agree, great suggestion.

i think the suggested G11 would be a great choice. especially since you already own the 420ex.
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Old Nov 29, 2009, 1:27 PM   #19
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i agree, great suggestion.

i think the suggested G11 would be a great choice. especially since you already own the 420ex.
I see the Powershot G11 suggested by Steve as a "Top Pick" but not with a full review....I always like to see reviews with all the details

...I would think that it would be a safe choice though since it is recommended here....anyone know what the weaknesses would be for this camera?

What would the flash range without my big flash be? if I chose not to use it for some reason?

This is another interesting and appealing suggestion.

The cost is still a bit high for what money I have....maybe I could hope for a sale ? or just keep waiting .....

You all are so knowledgable and I appreciate your willingness to share some information with me...
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Old Nov 29, 2009, 2:02 PM   #20
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Aunt Nelly-

The canon G-11 is an excellent camera with a hot shoe that will handle your EX-420 Flash just fine. I purchased and then returned the G-11. I did that because the 5X optical zoom (28 to 140mm in 35mm terms) was not enough zoom for my tastes. In contrast, the H-20 has 10X optical zoom and cost 1/2 of the G-11's cost.

Without using your EX-420 Flash, the flash range on the G-11, using auto ISOP would be 10 to 16 feet. The G-11 is a good camera and it also has some higher ISO capabilities as well making ISO settings right up to, and including ISO 800 very usable.

Sarah Joyce
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