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Old Nov 30, 2009, 2:00 PM   #11
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They are starting to restrict even p&s cameras. I was made to delete my SD card and put away my little Panny LX1 at a recent concert.
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Old Nov 30, 2009, 2:12 PM   #12
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Well, it depends. They are mostly headliners, but since i write for an internet magazine, I was allowed into the "photo-rift" in front of the stage. otherwise, they were bands from the metal section, with mostly dark colours and alike. Since I do not have any knowledge about lenses, I do not know, whether the image quality of the olympus would suffice. Beg your pardon, if this all sounds a bit amateurish. I know it must sound strange for someone new into DSLR to demand crisp pictures and image quality, but I would just love to keep the new camera as long as the 8080, which lasted 8 years and did well..and thus i do not want to spend the money lightly.
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Old Nov 30, 2009, 2:14 PM   #13
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if this is a major portion of your shooting, go with the Canon, as it will do better in these low-light conditions.
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Old Dec 1, 2009, 3:23 AM   #14
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well then, thanks for all the information. is there also a recommendation with which lens-starter kit to go for? I was looking for a rather wide-angle- lense set..
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Old Dec 2, 2009, 7:08 AM   #15
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..or does anybody already know how the pentax k-x compares to the canon, imagewise?
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Old Dec 2, 2009, 7:50 AM   #16
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The Pentax might have a *very* slight edge at higher ISO speeds from samples I've compared elsewhere in controlled conditions. The Pentax K-x is using a new Sony 12MP CMOS Sensor design that does quite well at higher ISO speeds. But, I think you'd probably be hard pressed to see much difference between their output, even "pixel peeping" at 100% viewing size if you used similar settings for exposure. I think you'll find that the Canon is going to have better Autofocus with the ability to lock focus in lower lighting (which you may need in low light venues shooting Live Music). Another camera using a newer Sony 12MP CMOS Sensor design is the Sony A500. Note that the Nikon D5000 and D90 also use a Sony 12MP CMOS Sensor. You'll find image processing differences between models using a Sony sensor (as well as slight differences in the sensors and AA Filters used by a specific manufacturer). But, the output should be very similar from them.

Note that for low light venues (live music in clubs/bars), you're going to need a very bright lens unless they have very good stage lighting. The kit lenses are not going to "cut it". So, I'd make sure to budget some money for lenses needed. In a bright prime shooting close to the band, you may want to look at a Sigma 30mm f/1.4 EX DC HSM. It's available for Nikon, Sony, Pentax and Canon camera mounts and runs around $439 at popular vendors. In a less expensive (and little longer) prime, I'd look at the 50mm f/1.8 (or f/1.4) AF lenses from the camera manufacturers. With better stage lighting, you can probably get away with a zoom (but you'll want to use one with f/2.8 available throughout the focal range). Depending on how close you are (and how wide a shot you want to capture), you may want to look at something like the Tamron 17-50mm f/2.8, Sigma 24-70mm f/2.8 or Tamron 28-75mm f/2.8 lenses (or the camera manufacturers' lenses in those general focal ranges, making sure to get one with f/2.8 available throughout the zoom range).
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Old Dec 4, 2009, 2:32 PM   #17
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I have a problem.. i spent some time at the store today..and i lost a bit faith in the 500D. The problem is that the "trigger" is just too small for my rather big hands. therefore, i had to rather draw my finger back to push it ..

the pentax is okay, but the nikon models felt..better to my hand. in particular the D5000 and some model "D5000 II". How do these two compare? Or does anybody have other suggestions for..bigger hands?
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Old Dec 4, 2009, 2:38 PM   #18
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yea, i can definately relate. particularly since I am used to my Canon 50d which has rather deep and think handgrip. For me any of the entry-level dslrs are pretty small for me.

if you are comfortable with nikon d5000, and are aware of the limitations on certain lenses due to the lack of a focus motor (u can work around this with lens selection too for example the sigma 30 1.4 jim mentions has a motor) then by all means it is a great camera that performs quite well in low-light situations.
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Old Dec 5, 2009, 4:52 AM   #19
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thanks a lot for the answer..my first impression was, that I was being to choosy. ;o)

Could anybody tell me how the 5000 compares to the EOS 500D? Imagewise alone? And what exactly are you referring to with "limitation on certain lenses"? Anything else I should know about ? =)
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Old Dec 5, 2009, 5:15 AM   #20
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Many Nikon Autofocus Lenses require a focus motor in the camera body to Autofocus. Beginning with the Nikon D40, Nikon started removing the in body focus motor in their entry level dSLR models. The models with no motor (so far) are the Nikon D40, D40x, D60, D3000 and D5000. All other Nikon dSLR models have a focus motor built into their body.

So, with the newer models, you'll need to use lenses that have a focus motor built into the lens for Autofocus. In the Nikon lineup, that means using an AF-S (Silent Wave Motor) lens. As a result, some Nikkor Autofocus lenses (for example, the Nikkor AF 50mm f/1.8 and AF 85mm f/1.8) will not Autofocus on these entry level camera bodyies (because they are not AF-S lenses). But, for low light shooting, those are popular choices. Now, Nikon does have a lot of lenses that will Autofocus on a model like the D5000. But, some of the less expensive (and brighter primes) may be missed by some users, depending on what they are shooting.

Note that you will also find some gaps in the lineups with third party lenses for Nikon cameras (many don't have focus motors built in). But, that's gradually changing now (more and more lenses will have focus motors built in for use on Nikon's entry level cameras). In Sigma lenses, make sure a lens you consider has HSM (Hypersonic Motor Focusing) in it's description if you want Autofocus on a Nikon body like the D5000. Sigma's HSM is similar to Nikon's AF-S. In lenses from other manufacturers like Tamron, make sure the lens description specifically says that a given lens has a "Built In Motor" (and note that you may find older versions without a motor, and newer versions with a motor in some lens models).
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