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Old Dec 4, 2009, 1:26 PM   #11
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The K100D is a 6 Megapixel model introduced several years ago, and is well liked by some of our Pentax shooters, as it has lower noise levels and/or more retained detail at higher ISO speeds compared to the newer 10 Megapixel models, depending on their noise reduction settings.

But, it's a relatively slow camera by today's standards with a very small internal buffer size (only 4 frames shooting jpeg or 3 frames shooting raw) for continuous shooting before the camera slows down significantly, with very slow write speeds to memory cards, and autofocus that's going to be slower than the other cameras you looked at. So, for any kind of action shooting, it would not be a great choice.
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Old Dec 4, 2009, 1:31 PM   #12
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yea, as jim said this camera is almost 4 years old at this point. while a good camera in its day, and for that reason many ppl hold on to them still, but starting off with a camera already 4 years old.... that makes it difficult to suggest as a good value..

if you are enjoying the Pentax feel and brand. Have you looked into the K2000/KM, the price has come down substantially since the release of the K-X and many are being sold 2nd hand as Pentaxians upgrade to the K-X. With the newest firmwares, the K2000/KM is a solid performer with good high-iso capabilities considering its low price tag.
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Old Dec 4, 2009, 1:50 PM   #13
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Another thing to be aware of is that Pentax bodies older than the K10D (and the K100D fits into that category) won't work with third party lenses that rely on an internal focus motor like Sigma's HSM (Hypersonic Motor) focusing lenses.

That's because the Pentax SDM (Supersonic Drive Motor) lenses were not introduced until later, and the older camera bodies like the K100D don't have the extra connections and electronics needed to communicate with lenses reliant on a built in motor instead of a camera body's focus motor. Note that the newer K100D Super (versus original K100D) model does support that feature.
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Old Dec 4, 2009, 5:29 PM   #14
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Thanks, when you say its a relatively slow camera, does this mean the shutter speed or something else. Also, if a car was driving past me at around 50mph would the k100D be able to capture that in any great detail, also what do you mean by, only 4 frames. Sorry as you can tell I'm a complete novice, I can't find the K2000 anywhere on uk sites, is it available over here?

Thanks again
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Old Dec 4, 2009, 10:39 PM   #15
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I'm talking about frames per second when shooting in continuous drive mode. Digital Cameras have fast internal memory they use to buffer photos taken while they are being written to a memory card. Once the internal buffer fills up, a camera will slow down to the speed it's able to write to the memory card.

The K100D only has the ability to take around 4 or 5 JPEG photos before it slows down from around 3 frames per second to around 1 frame per second, even with a fast memory card in it (and it may take around 4.5 seconds to finish writing the buffer contents to memory after a burst of images). RAW (versus JPEG) is much slower. So, it's not ideal for sports compared to many other models that allow you to take a lot more photos at a fast frame rate without any slowdown (so that you're not waiting on the camera if you are taking a lot bursts). A number of newer entry level cameras can shoot around 3 frames per second or faster until a fast memory card is full (versus being limited to 4 or 5 frames). More advanced cameras will have even faster frame rates (for example, around 5 frames per second in the next "market niche"; and even faster frame rates for higher end models).
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Old Dec 5, 2009, 4:11 AM   #16
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Thanks, so is it only slow when you hold down the button down to take lots of photos at once. Like this http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KCN167MVaRc Do you need to take a burst to capture action shots.

What second-hand camera would you reccommend for a similar price that is more suited to action shots but still delivers really clear pictures like the k100d.
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Old Dec 5, 2009, 4:24 AM   #17
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Would the Nikon d50 be a suitable alternative, also how much should a good condition one cost at the moment, sorry for all the questions, just want to get this right.

Thanks
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Old Dec 5, 2009, 5:24 AM   #18
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It may not even be a concern (number of photos in a burst before the camera slows down), depending on what you are shooting. I just wanted to point out that some models are not as good in that area (like the Pentax K100D) compared to some of the newer models (which may be a concern if you want to take lots of bursts shooting sports). If you want to see how cameras perform in that area, read the conclusion section in the reviews here for cameras you consider (last page before the sample images in each model's review).

For example, here's a quote from the conclusion page for the D50 you're asking about:

Quote:
In continuous shooting mode, the D50 lived-up to Nikon's promise of 2.5 frames per second, capturing 20 images in 7.1 seconds; subsequent shots were taken at 4/10 to 7/10 second intervals. The D50's buffer performance was good, taking about 3.5 seconds to flush a full buffer of JPEG Large Fine images to the SD memory card. These measurements were made using an AF-S Nikkor 18-55mm lens and a fast SanDisk Ultra II 2GB SD memory card, shooting Large (3008x2000) Fine JPEG images. Nikon claims that dialing back image quality to Large/Normal allows the D50 to capture images at 2.5fps to a depth of 137 shots when using a 256MB SanDisk Ultra II SD Card; I was unable to attain that depth using a SanDisk Ultra II 2GB SD card.
Things slowed substantially shooting RAW (NEF) images. In single-shot mode, 4 NEF images could be captured at 4/10 second intervals, while subsequent shots with the full buffer came at 1.7 second intervals. In continuous drive mode, 4 NEF images were captured in 1.1 seconds, and subsequent shots could be taken at 1 to 1.5 second intervals with the buffer full. It took 6.5 seconds for the D50 to flush its entire buffer of NEF images to the SD card. RAW+JPEG mode slowed the D50 even more; it captured the first 4 images in the same 1.1 seconds, but subsequent shots came at 1.5 to 2 second intervals and the full buffer flushed in 8 seconds. RAW+JPEG produces only a Basic quality JPEG; there are no other JPEG quality selections available.
http://www.steves-digicams.com/camer...review-18.html


Here's a quote from the Pentax K100D conclusion:


Quote:
From power-on till the first image was captured measured 1.2 seconds, and waking it from sleep mode took the same. Shutter lag, the delay between depressing the shutter and capturing the image, was 1/10 second when pre-focused, and between 2/10 and 8/10 second including autofocus time for a high-contrast subject, depending on the degree of focus change. Shot-to-shot delay averaged about 1/2 second without flash; the internal flash recycle time extended shot-shot delay to between 1.3 and 4 seconds, depending on subject distance. The use of red eye reduction flash mode extended shutter lag to 7/10 second.
Continuous Shooting mode captured 5 JPEG Best quality shots in 1.5 seconds, with subsequent shots at 8/10 second intervals as the camera emptied its full buffer. It required 4.5 seconds to write a buffer full of JPEG images to SD card before being ready to capture the next burst at full speed. The above times were observed using a SanDisk Ultra II 2GB SD memory card, 18-55mm kit lens, flash off, continuous AF, daylight lighting, 3008x2000 JPEG/Fine. We also tested with a MyFlash 4GB 150x Turbo SD card (not a SDHC type), achieving similar results. The K100D is also compatible with the latest SDHC type SD cards as well.
Shooting in RAW mode slows things down a bit. The Continuous burst mode captured 3 images in 8/10 second, with subsequent shots at 3.6 second intervals as buffer contents were processed; it took about 10 seconds to empty a buffer full of RAW images.
http://www.steves-digicams.com/camer...-review-7.html

As for pricing on used gear, I'd check the used departments at vendors like these:

http://www.keh.com

http://www.bhphotovideo.com

http://www.adorama.com
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Old Dec 5, 2009, 5:55 AM   #19
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Thanks very much for your help, I think i've decided to go for K100D as despite it not being great for action shots it seems like it has pretty good spec in the other areas. Also in the review it says, 'allowing the user to capture a series of the subject's action or movement.' Does this mean it will be able to capture cars on a race track, because thats the only action photography I will be using it for.

Thanks
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Old Dec 5, 2009, 7:54 AM   #20
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Well... capturing race cars is one time when you may want to use burst mode, depending on the type of race and what you're trying to accomplish. One technique you see used is a very slow shutter speed while panning with the vehicle (so that you end up with blurred wheels, enhancing the feel of motion), and it can be difficult to get sharp photos due to car vibration on a track (depending on the type of track, how slow the shutter speeds you're trying to use are, etc.). That way (with a burst), you're more likely to see a photo with less vibration that's sharper than another one in the same burst (and your panning skills also come into the equation, as using that kind of technique requires a higher skill level to get keepers). But, there are other ways to approach it. Focus lock time and tracking ability also comes into the equation (rapidly moving subjects can place more demands on the equipment needed for a higher percentage of keepers). Now, you do see some pretty nice race car images from users of dSLR models with less than desirable Autofocus Systems (and you could always prefocus or use manual focus if the system can't lock fast enough on the cars you're trying to shoot). But, it's not a great choice for that purpose (and most budget dSLR won't be).
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